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Stuart Davis, Swing Landscape, 1938 (section)


Upcoming Events

 


Past Events

November 8, 2013
Where is American Literature?

October 24, 2013
Conscience Tolerable and Intolerable

October 14, 2013
Beard at 100

October 1, 2013
An Evening with Frederick Wiseman

September 24, 2012
The Constitution, the Court, and America's Promise

April 17, 2012
Who are the 50 Funniest American Writers?

September 24, 2011
Lyrics from Lockdown

September 11, 2011
Ten Years After

April 14, 2011
An Evening with Neil Gaiman

April 1, 2011
The End of Normal

March 9, 2011
Animating an Archive

March 1, 2011
Columbia Calls

February 25, 2011
Habitable Worlds

October 18, 2010
Theater in America

September 15, 2010
Hispanic New York and the Latinoization of the United States

April 15, 2010
Obama, King, Ralph Ellison, and the American Dream

February 18, 2010
Dancing in the Dark

October 27, 2009
Becoming Americans

March 23, 2009
From the Garden onto the Plate

November 22, 2008
Lincoln in His Time and Ours

October 30, 2008
C. Wright Mills and the Politics of Truth

April 25, 2008
Blogging: Good or Bad for Literary Culture

April 11, 2008
Tribute to Philip Roth on His 75th Birthday

 

 

 

UPCOMING EVENTS

 

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PAST EVENTS



Beard at 100

October 14, 2013
6:30-8:30 p.m.
333 Uris Hall
3022 Broadway (at 117th Street)

Charles A. Beard's Economic Interpretation of the Constitution (1913) has proven one of the most influential, and controversial, works on the American Founding.  On the 100th anniversary of its publication, The Center for American Studies will host a conversation on Beard's legacy moderated by Herbert Sloan (Barnard College), with Eric Foner (Columbia University), Jan Lewis (Rutgers University), and David Waldstreicher (Temple University).

Sponsored by the Center for American Studies, with support from the Jack Miller Center.

For a summary of the event, check out Katy Lasdow's blog post here.



 

 



Lyrics from Lockdown

September 24, 2011
7-9 p.m.
Miller Theatre
2960 Broadway (at 116 Street)

The Columbia Alumni Association (CAA) and the Center for American Studies invite you to a special presentation of Lyrics from Lockdown featuring Bryonn Bain ’95CC, award-winning slam poet and activist.

In his multimedia solo performance piece, Bain presents a searing critique of the American justice system. The production is based on his own wrongful imprisonment for what he memorably termed (in a cover story for the Village Voice) “walking while black.” With the support of a live band and video DJ, Bain tells his story with an imaginative blend of hip-hop, theater, and spoken word.


Ten Years After: The Legacy of 9/11 in American Culture

September 11, 2011
5 p.m.
The Italian Academy at Columbia University
1161 Amsterdam Avenue (at 118th Street)

The Center for American Studies at Columbia University presents a discussion introduced by Adam Kirsch and moderated by Sam Tanenhaus with Deborah Eisenberg, Claire Messud, Joseph O'Neill, and George Packer.

Sponsored by the Center for American Studies and broadcast by the Columbia Alumni Association (CAA). Watch the webcast here.


An Evening With Neil Gaiman

April 14, 2011
7 p.m.
Symphony Space
2537 Broadway (at 95th Street)

Join Paul Levitz, former publisher of DC Comics and lecturer at Columbia University's Center for American Studies as he talks with Neil Gaiman about his life and his writing.

This event is free for Columbia Affiliates with ID; RSVP in advance and show ID at Box Office window. Non-CU Affiliates: $10; Day of Show $15
Tickets may be purchased online at www.symphonyspace.org.
Columbia affiliates should RSVP online at iijs.columbia.edu.

Sponsored by the Institute for Israel & Jewish Studies and the Center for American Studies.


The End of Normal

April 1, 2011
4 - 5:30 p.m.
754 Schermerhorn Extension
Reception to follow

The concept of the "normal" has been used for 150 years to justify a range of "scientific" and scholarly approaches to the human body. But in the past 15 years, the concept of normality has been replaced by the concept of "diversity." So we are at the end of normal, in that sense. Lennard J. Davis elaborated on the consequences of such an uneven development as well as critique the concept of diversity as part of a larger critique of neo-liberalism.

Lennard J. Davis is Distinguished Professor of English at the University of Illinois at Chicago, School of Arts and Sciences, and also Professor of Disability and Human Development in the School of Applied Health Sciences and Professor of Medical Education in the University of Illinois College of Medicine. He is also director of Project Biocultures, a think-tank devoted to issues around culture, medicine, disability, biotechnology, and the biosphere.

Presented by the Department of English & Comparative Literature, the
Center for the Critical Analysis of Social Difference, the Graduate School of Arts & Sciences, and the Center for American Studies as part of The Ethics of Disability Studies speaker series.


Animating an Archive: Repetition and Regeneration in
Alison Bechdel's Fun Home

March 9, 2011
4 p.m.
523 Butler Library

Hillary Chute is Neubauer Family Assistant Professor in the English Department at the University of Chicago. Previously a Junior Fellow in literature in the Society of Fellows at Harvard University, she has published work in PMLA, Modern Fiction Studies, Twentieth-Century Literature, and Women’s Studies Quarterly, among other periodicals. She is associate editor of Art Spiegelman’s MetaMaus and has written about comics and culture for venues including the Village Voice and the Believer. Chute is the author of Graphic Women: Life Narrative and Contemporary Comics (Columbia University Press, 2010).

Open to the public. A reception will follow the talk.

Sponsored by the Center for American Studies and Columbia University Libraries.


Columbia Calls: The State of American Higher Education

March 1, 2011
8 p.m.
Kraft Center, 5th floor
606 W. 115th Street

Join American Studies professors Andrew Delbanco and Roger Lehecka for an in-depth conversation on higher education in the United States. Refreshments will be provided.

Sponsored by The Arts Initiative at Columbia University and The Current: A Journal of Contemporary Politics, Culture, and Jewish Affairs.


Habitable Worlds: Eugenic Spaces and Democratic Spaces

February 25, 2011
4–5:30 p.m.
754 Schermerhorn Extension

Join Rosemarie Garland-Thomas, professor of Women's Studies at Emory University, for a presentation that reads the intentions, logics, narratives, and consequences in the dystopic world presented in Kazuo Ishiguro's novel Never Let Me Go (2005) and its subsequent film adaptation (2010) as an example of a specific contradiction in contemporary US culture. This event is part of the Spring 2011 Speaker Series presented by the Ethics of Disability Studies.

Sponsored by the Department of English & Comparative Literature, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, Center for the Critical Analysis of Social Difference, and Center for American Studies.


Theater in America

October 18, 2010
6 p.m.
Casa Italiana
1161 Amsterdam Avenue (at 118th Street)

Laurence Senelick, editor of the Library of America's new anthology, The American Stage: Writing on Theater from Washington Irving to Tony Kushner, sits down with Tony Kushner, actor Tovah Feldshuh, and director Gregory Mosher for an evening of anecdotes, reading, and discussion. Click here to see the poster online (PDF).

Sponsored by the Center for American Studies, the Library of America, and the Columbia Institute for Israel and Jewish Studies.

This event is free and open to the public. Seating is on a first come, first served basis.


Hispanic New York and the Latinoization of the United States

September 15, 2010
6–8 p.m.
Davis Auditorium, Morris A. Schapiro Center
530 W. 120th Street

Join the Center for American Studies for a panel discussion and presentation of Hispanic New York: A Sourcebook, edited by Professor Claudio Iván Remeseira. Panelists include Paul Berman, Gabriel Haslip-Viera, Frances Negrón-Mutaner, Claudio Iván Remeseira, Milagros Ricourt, and Virginia Sánchez Korrol; moderated by Ray Suarez.

Co-sponsored by Columbia University's Center for American Studies, Center for the Study of Ethnicity and Race, and the New-York Historical Society.

This event is free and open to the public. Seating is on a first come, first served basis.


The Lionel Trilling Seminar: “Obama, King, Ralph Ellison, and the American Dream”

April 15, 2010
6:15 p.m.
Davis Auditorium, the Schapiro Center

Eric Sundquist, Distinguished Professor of English at UCLA, will deliver the Lionel Trilling Seminar on “Obama, King, Ralph Ellison, and the American Dream.” Responding will be Kenneth Warren, Fairfax M. Cone Distinguished Service Professor at the University of Chicago; and Glenn Loury, Merton P. Stoltz Professor of the Social Sciences at Brown University. Presented by the Heyman Center for the Humanities.

This event is free and open to the public. No tickets or registration are necessary. Seating is on a first come, first served basis. Click here for more information.


Dancing in the Dark: A Cultural History of the Great Depression

February 18, 2010

 

With Morris Dickstein of the CUNY Graduate Center
Presented by the Herbert H. Lehman Center for American History; co-sponsored by the American Studies Program


Becoming Americans: Writing the Immigrant Experience

October 27, 2009

 

Featuring Ilan Stavans, Jhumpa Lahiri, and Gary Shteyngart
Presented by Columbia University's Institute for Israel and Jewish Studies, the American Studies Program, and the Library of America.

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From the Garden onto the Plate: One Writer's Path

March 23, 2009

With Michael Pollan, award-winning author of current bestseller In Defense of Food: An Eater’s Manifesto and The Omnivore’s Dilemma: A Natural History of Four Meals.

Pollan has been called a "post-wilderness nature writer" for his articles and books about the messy places where the natural and human worlds intersect - places like the garden, buildings, domesticated plants and agriculture. In his talk, he will trace the path of his writing from his graduate school encounters (here at Columbia) with Thoreau and Emerson through his work on the ecology and politics of eating.
Sponsored by the American Studies Program at Columbia University.


Lincoln in His Time and Ours

November 22, 2008

Watch the C-Span video coverage here.

The Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History and the American Studies Program and History Department of Columbia University have joined together to observe the bicentennial of Lincoln’s birth in 1809 and to mark the publication of Our Lincoln: New Perspectives on Lincoln and His World, edited by Eric Foner, DeWitt Clinton Professor of History, Columbia University (W.W. Norton & Company).

Discussion topics ranged from “Lincoln, Emancipation, and the Rights of Black Americans” to “Lincoln’s Religion” and “Abraham Lincoln, Commander in Chief.”

Participants include: David W. Blight (Yale University), Christopher Leslie Brown (Columbia University), Richard Carwardine (University of Oxford), Catherine Clinton (Queen’s University Belfast), Andrew Delbanco (Columbia University), Eric Foner (Columbia University), Harold Holzer (Co-chair, U.S. Abraham Lincoln Bicentennial Commission), James McPherson (Princeton University), Mark Neely (Pennsylvania State University), James Oakes (City University of New York), Manisha Sinha (University of Massachusetts), Sean Wilentz (Princeton University).


C. Wright Mills and the Politics of Truth

October 30, 2008

The American Studies Program and Oxford University Press present a panel discussion with John H. Summers, Todd Gitlin, and Casey Nelson Blake.

The first collection of Mill's writings to be published since 1963, The Politics of Truth contains 23 out-of-print and hard-to-find writings which show his growth from academic sociologist to an intellectual maestro in command of a mature style, a dissenter who sought to inspire the public to oppose the drift toward permanent war. Given the political deceptions of recent years, Mills's truth-telling is more relevant than ever.


Blogging: Good or Bad for Literary Culture

April 25, 2008

A debate and discussion with Sven Birkerts, writer and critic, director, Bennington College writing seminars and Jenny Davidson, blogger, novelist, professor, Columbia University. Sponsored by the American Studies Program in collaboration with the Department of English.


Tribute to Philip Roth on His 75th Birthday

April 11, 2008

Panel Discussion with Jonathan Lethem, Nathan Englander, Hermione Lee, and other prominent writers. Co-sponsored by The Library of America in collaboration with The National Book Foundation.

Watch the C-Span coverage of the event or read the Columbia News article "At 75, Roth Has No Complaints" here.

 

 

 

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The Center for American Studies at Columbia University
1130 Amsterdam Avenue, MC 2810
319-321 Hamilton Hall
New York, NY 10027| 212-854-6698