Columbia University Sociology Home
ABOUT USFACULTYCOURSESEVENTSFIELDWORK PROJECTSDIRECTORIESRESOURCESNEWS

Events
CCA Events
Lecture Series
Brown Bag Research Seminars
Graduate Student Conference
New York Archaeological Consortium
Workshops
Other Columbia Events
Other New York Area Lectures
Other Archaeological Events
TAG


Workshops
Workshops
Archives
Archives


Spring 2008
Fall 2007
Spring 2007
Fall 2006


Spring 2008

Bone Workshop
Friday, April 11
4:00-6:00 pm
Pam Crabtree, New York University
Location: 308 and 309 lab, Anthropology Building (25 Waverly Place) at NYU

This workshop is designed to teach students how to identify the common domesticated animals that are found on archaeological sites in the Old World and historic North America. The workshop will focus on the osteology of cattle, sheep, goats, pigs and dogs.

Tool Workshop
Friday, April 25
3:00-5:00 pm
Severin Fowles, Barnrad College
Location: Students are to meet at the lawn in front of Philosophy building.

All students are welcome to attend and receive a basic introduction to flint knapping. No experience required.

 

Back to Top 


Fall 2007

Bone Workshop: Animal Bone for the Archaeologist - An Introduction
Open first to students and others on a space available basis
Friday, October 12
Professor Pam Crabtree, NYU
308 and 309 Anthropology Building, 25 Waverly Place at NYU
5:00-7:00 pm

This workshop will provide a hands-on introduction to the identification and analysis of faunal bones from archaeological sites. The topics that will be covered include identification of animal bones, ageing, sexing, measurement, and how these data are used to study past animal husbandry and hunting practices.

Bone Workshop: Identification Human Bone : Male or female, Can the Skull Tell the tale?
Friday, October 19
Jill Schapiro, Lecturer, Department of Evolution, and Environmental Biology, Columbia University
954 Schermerhorn, 5:00-7:00 pm

The determination for sex is one of the first steps an archaeologist, biological anthropologist or forensic scientist undertakes upon discovery of a skeleton. Under the makeup, hair and flesh, the skull holds many clues that researchers can use to puzzle out identity. In this workshop we'll explore both observational and metric approaches to sexing modern human skulls.

Workshop: An Introduction to Conservation for Archaeologists
Open first to students and others on a space available basis

Friday, November 9 Julie Unruh, Conservator
954 Schermerhorn, 2:00-5:00 pm

This workshop will present strategies for object presentation on an archaeological site. Topics to be discussed include factors contributing to the deterioration of excavated objects, how to minimize damage immediately post-excavation, appropriate materials for conservation, a review of both past and present conservation treatments, artifact storage on-site, and resources for setting up a conservation program in the field.

Friday, December 7
Pottery Workshop: Overview of clay and ceramic vessel formation from the perspective of a contemporary potter.
Jeffery Lamia, professional potter
Mugi Studio, 993 Amsterdam Avenue, 2:30 - 5:30 pm

The workshop presents an overview of ceramics from the perspective of a contemporary potter. It begins by having the attendees put their hands into various clay bodies in order to feel the differences among them.From this "feel" the workshop interrelates: the chemical qualities of each type of clay body; the practical throwing effects for different types of vessels; tools; glazings and aesthetic considerations, and firing issues. The potter will throw various types of vessels during the workshop. The attendees will also try their hand at throwing vessels on a pottery wheel. From time-to-time questions/comments concerning anthropological, archaeological and utilitarian issues will be introduced.



Back to Top 


Spring 2007

Tuesday, February 13
Textile Workshop: Weaving on a Warp-Weighted Loom
Susan Edmunds, producer and host of the DVD Textile: An Introduction to Wool-Working for Readers of Greek and Latin.
954 Schermerhorn extension, 5:00-7:00

The warp-weighted loom was the principle means of cloth production in Europe for thousands of years. It is easily made of simple materials, is adaptable to many different weave structures, can accommodate warps that are both long and wide, and takes up very little floor space. Although gradually superseded in southern Europe at the time of the Roman Empire by other types of looms, warp-weighted looms continued to be used in remote areas -into the 20th century in northern Scandinavia.
This workshop will cover the essential skills needed to weave on a Mediterranean-type warp-weighted loom, including making a warp, attaching it to loom, and weaving simple types of cloth.
The workshop should provide archaeologists with a better understanding of this weaving technology and should help classicists visualize the basis of one of the most common metaphors in ancient Greek and Roman literature.

Friday, April 13
Textile Workshop: Visit to the Antonio Ratti Textile Center and the Textile Conservation studio of the Metropolitan Museum of Art
Please R.S.V.P. to cm2418@columbia.edu

Friday, April 20
Pottery Workshop with Jeffery Lamia, professional potter
Open first to students and others on a space available basis
Mugi Studio, 993 Amsterdam Avenue, 2:30 - 5:30 pm

Back to Top 


Fall 2006 

Monday September 11
Informal Introduction for students to GIS Lab and its Resources, Columbia University
Tour by Youri Gorohovich
Mudd Building, 8th floor, 827 (GIS lab), 5:00-6:00 pm

Geographic Information System (GIS) Lab belongs to the Department of Earth and Environmental Engineering and was equipped by Clean Ocean and Shore Trust (COAST). It serves many graduate and undergraduate students in their research and course work. The lab has 13 workstations with variety of software for spatial analysis, modeling and statistics, including full suite of ArcGIS software by ESRI.
The intro to the lab is very informal and designed to familiarize archaeology students with available computing resources. Dr. Yuri Gorokhovich will answer questions and provide feedback on student's inquiries on potential application of GIS resources to the field of archaeology.

Tuesday October 10
Textile Workshop (first of a four part series)
Susan Edmunds, producer and host of the DVD Textile: An Introduction to Wool-Working for Readers of Greek and Latin and Nelda Davis, Master Spinner and teacher of spinning
From Fiber to Thread- A hands-on workshop
Open first to students and other s on a space available basis
954 Schermerhorn extension, 5:00 pm

Topics covered:
- The condition of fleece as it comes from the sheep
-Washing
-CArding/combing and other means of homogenizing the fiber
-Drawing out the fiber to prepare it for spinning
-From fiber to continuous thread: how spinning works
-Using a hand spindle to produce thread
Participants will have the opportunity to handle wool fibers, to practice drawing out and spinning with a hooked stick, and to try spinning with a spindle.

October 12 and 19
Global Positioning System (GIS) Workshop with Yuri Gorohovich
Workshop on GIS applications with special topics for archaeology
Open first to students and other s on a space available basis
Room 827, Mudd Building, 4:00-8:00
Space limited. Please RSVP to cm2418@columbia.edu

GIS in Archaeology, Intro
Basics of GIS, lecture
ArcGIS Interface (National Park Service (NPS) Modules 1-2)
Data Entry in ArcGIS (NPS Module 6)
Georeferencing technique and coordinate system transformation
Creating Google Earth application

Friday October 20
Pottery Workshop with Jeffery Lamia, professional potter
Open first to students and other s on a space available basis
Plimpton Hall, 1235 Amsterdam Avenue, 2:00 - 5:00 pm

Tuesday December 12
Textile Workshop with Susan Edmunds (second of a four part series)
Weaving fundamentals - A hands-on workshop
Open first to students and other s on a space available basis
954 Schermerhorn extension, 5:00 pm

Tpoics covered:
-Winding a warp; the warp cross
-Methods of tensioning the warp
-Methods of spacing the warp
-Shedding devices
-Introducing the weft: shuttles, butterflies and bobbins
-Weft placement: beaters
-Finishing
The emphasis will be on basic principles that are common to most loom types. Participants will have an opportunity to try weaving on both frame tapestry looms and table looms with harnesses.

Back to Top 


CU HOMEARCHAEOLOGY HOMECONTACT USSITE MAPmain-nav.xmlmain-nav.xml
Web Services Link Web Services Image