Gillian Young

Core Lecturer for Art Humanities

Modern and contemporary art
PhD., Columbia University, 2018

Contact Information

Email:
Office: 925 Schermerhorn
Office Hours: Tuesdays and Thursdays, 2:30-3:30 by appointment

Biography

Gillian Young is a Core Lecturer for Art Humanities within the Department of Art History and Archaeology at Columbia University. She works at the intersection of modern and contemporary art history, performance studies, media theory, and feminist critique. Her research and teaching interests include performance and video art, media archaeology, international artist networks and the history of telecommunications, and experimental ethnography.

Stemming from her dissertation on the American artist Joan Jonas, Young’s current book project examines Jonas’s key role in the intertwined emergence of video and performance art in the 1970s. This research has received support from Columbia University, the Henry Luce Foundation/American Council of Learned Societies, the Getty Research Institute, and the Pierre and Tana Matisse Foundation.

Young’s interdisciplinary scholarship is informed by her education at Brown University (BA, Literatures and Cultures in English, 2005), NYU (MA, Media, Culture, and Communication, 2011), and Columbia University (PhD, Art History, 2018). Before beginning her doctorate at Columbia, she worked in the Department of Media and Performance Art at the Museum of Modern Art in New York. She has been teaching Art Humanities within the Core Curriculum at Columbia since 2014. This summer, she will teach an undergraduate seminar on the history of performance art in New York City.

Selected Publications

The Endless Drawings of Joan Jonas.” Document Journal. No. 2 (SS 2018).

An Audience is Divided: Benjamin Patterson, Clifford Owens, and the Politics of Representation.” TDR: The Drama Review. Vol. 58, No. 2 (Summer 2014): 115-131.

Social Media: Juan Downey’s Video Trans Americas.” Interventions. Vol. 2, No. 2 (2013).

The Score: How Does Fluxus Perform?PAJ: A Journal of Performance and Art. Vol. 34, No. 2 (May 2012): 37-45.