Current PhD Students

Last updated on May 19, 2016.

A Agarwala, Seher
B Barnard, Bailey
Bartel, Jens
Beach, Caitlin
Becherini, Marta
Berninghausen, Gale
Bernstein, Margot
Biascoechea, Laura
Blair, Susannah
Bowyer, Emerson **
Boyd, Rachel E.W.
Bulger, Monica
Butler, Eliza
C Campbell, Thomas Ian
Carlson, Raymond
Cataldo, Emogene
Chan, Kelly
Choi, Connie
Christiaens, Karin
Cinar, Muge
Clemens, Olivia
Cohen, Lucas
Coman, Sonia
Cook, Emily Margaret
Cook, Lindsay
Crockett, Vivian
Croggon, Nicholas
Cushman, Carrie
D D'Addio, Sophia
D'Arista, Carla **
Damman, Catherine
de Lacaze, Michaela
Di Croce, Alessandra
Du, Xiaohan
Dumouchelle, Kevin
E Ekserdjian, Alexander
Engler, Rachel
Ercan, Ayse
Espert, Yasmine
F Fiske, Courtney
Fitch, Nicholas
Floyd, Tiffany

Foner, Daria Rose
Fowler, Michael Anthony
Fucci, Robert
G Gans, Sofia
Gassaway, William
Gillman, Matthew
Gollnick, Beth
Gorant, Charlotte
Griggs, Nicole
H Helprin, Alexandra
Horisaki-Christens, Nina
J Johal, Rattanamol
Jiang, Chen
K Kang, Chang
Kim, Esther
Kim, Hae Yeun
Kim, Jeewon
Kremnitzer, Kathryn
Kobasa, Clare
Kodzhabasheva, Ani
Kuruvilla, Tara
L Landsman, Rozemarijn
Le Pouésard, Emma
Levine, Adam
Lima, Alvaro Luis
Llorens, Natasha Marie
Lores-Chavez, Isabella
M Magloughlin, Amara
Marshall, Janina (Piper)
Marzullo, Francesca
Masilela, Nomaduma
McCann, Natalie
Mellon, Diana
Menon, Arathi
Merkin, Sophia
Migwans, Crystal
Miller, Caitlin
Miller, Hasbrouck
Morgan, Nicholas
Muehlbauer, Mikael
Mustard, Maggie
N Niedbala, Steven
Ndungu, Jessica (Njeri)
Nisse, Cleo

P Peebles, Matt
Pesenti, Roberto
Pilavci, Turkan
Pires, Leah
Polonyi, Eszter
R Ralston, Daniel
Ratch, Corey
S Sanchez, Michael**
Scheier-Dolberg, Joseph
Schneller, David
Schriber, Abbe
Shah, Siddhartha V.
Silveri, Rachel
Sledge, David
Soley, Teresa
Stavis, Jacob
Suh, Hwanhee
Superfine, Molly
Szalay, Gabriella
T Tamur, Erhan
Teti, Matthew
Tolstoy, Irina
U Unger, Gwen V Vazquez, Julia
Vazquez de Arthur, Andrea Fabiola
Vigotti, Lorenzo
van Oppen, Brian
von Preussen, Brigid
W Wang, Alexis
Weintraub, Alex
Wiesenberger, Robert
Werier, Leah
Woldman, Joseph
Wolley, Heather
Wong, Eric
Y Yang, Yu
Young, Gillian
Z Zawodzinski, Stephen
Zhu, Cathy
Zinner, Valerie

** Student has defended their dissertation but has not deposited.

Bailey Barnard

Bailey Barnard

Art, Architecture and Gift-Exchange in Ancient Greece

Bailey Barnard is a second year PhD student focusing on the art and architecture of gift-exchange in ancient Greece. She completed her MA in art history from the University of Nebraska in 2011. Her MA thesis examined pre-existing systems of reciprocal gift-exchange influential to the development of Hellenistic euergetism. During her coursework at the University of Nebraska she won the Howard Award for Scholarly Writing in Art History for her paper entitled, “Revival Styles in the Crescent City: Local Peculiarities and National Trends.” Bailey attended the American School of Classical Studies summer session and taught art history courses as an adjunct until entering the PhD program in 2014. She has excavated with the University of Nebraska’s Antiochia ad Cragum Research Project and Field School and with Prof. Mylonopoulos’s team at the sanctuary of Poseidon at Onchestos. 

Jens Bartel

Japanese Art; Edo period painting

Jens is a sixth-year PhD student in Japanese art history. He received his M.A. in East Asian Art History and Japanese Studies from the University of Heidelberg; his master's thesis centered on folding screen paintings by the Edo period painter Maruyama Ōkyo. His dissertation will investigate large-scale interior paintings on sliding doors and wall panels by the same artist, commissioned by Buddhist temples in and around Kyoto during the latter half of the 18th century. His broader interests include the critical perception of pre-modern, particularly Edo period art during the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

Caitlin Beach

Caitlin Beach

Caitlin studies American and European art of the long nineteenth century, with a focus on race and representation. She received her B.A. in art history and history from Bowdoin College in 2010. Her doctoral dissertation investigates the relationships between the production and consumption of nineteenth-century figurative sculpture, and systems of commodification formed under Atlantic and American slavery. Research for this project has been previously supported by fellowships from the Smithsonian American Art Museum and the Cathedral Fund at the Royal Academy of Arts. She is currently the 2016-2018 Wyeth Fellow at the Center for the Advanced Study in the Visual Arts at the National Gallery of Art. 

Marta Becherini

Marta Becherini

South Asian Art and Architecture

Marta Becherini studied Oriental Languages and Civilizations in Venice, receiving her B.A. in Hindi from Ca' Foscari University in 2005. Prior to beginning her graduate studies at Columbia University, she spent two years working at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, first as an intern and then as research assistant in the Department of Asian Art. In 2008 she received her M.A. degree from Columbia University with a paper focusing on the cross-cultural dimension of the murals decorating a medieval Buddhist monastic complex in Ladakh. Her research interests include the issue of patronage in North Indian painting, particularly with regard to sub-imperial Mughal painting, the relationship between early Indo-Islamic architecture and the architectural traditions of Iran and Central Asia, and cultural and artistic exchanges between Europe and South Asia in early modern times.

Gale Berninghausen

Gale Berninghausen

South Asian Art and Architecture

Gale received her B.A. (Magna cum Laude with Highest Honors in Art History) from Middlebury College. Since joining Columbia's doctoral program in 2011, Gale has received her M.A. and M.Phil. degrees in South Asian art while also studying Chinese painting, Hindi, Urdu, and Sanskrit.  She is currently working on a dissertation that examines 18th and 19th century wall paintings in select temples and palaces of the Kangra Valley (Himachal Pradesh, northern India). The dissertation broadly explores artistic and political interactions between late Mughal, Hindu, and Sikh courts in the Punjab and lower Himalayan regions, with analysis of the transition from the lauded Kangra tradition of painting on paper and its associated religious literature to a similar yet unstudied modality of wall painting in both sacred and courtly contexts.   Gale's professional experience includes work for Sotheby's Indian and Southeast Asian Art Department, Johns Hopkins University' East Asian Studies Program, Middlebury College Museum of Art, management of a contemporary art gallery in Mumbai, and teaching art history at the undergraduate level. 

Margot Bernstein

Margot Bernstein

Margot Bernstein is a fifth-year Ph.D. candidate with a specialty in eighteenth-century art and visual culture. Her dissertation, "Carmontelle's Profile Pictures and the Things that Made Them Modern," examines hundreds of portraits on paper produced by Louis Carrogis called Carmontelle (1717-1806), a French amateur draftsman. Margot received her B.A. in art history and history from Williams College in 2010. She taught English for the French Ministry of Education in Paris during the 2010-2011 academic year. In 2012, she earned her M.A. in the History of Art from the Courtauld Institute of Art, where she studied eighteenth-century French and British drawings. Margot has also worked at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Frick Collection, the Morgan Library & Museum, the New-York Historical Society, the Calder Foundation, and the Williams College Museum of Art.

Susannah Blair

Nineteenth-century French and European Art

Susannah is a third-year PhD student concentrating in nineteenth-century French and European art and visual culture. She holds a master’s degree in the History of Art from Williams College and graduated with high honors from Swarthmore College in 2008. Before coming to Columbia, Susannah worked in curatorial departments at the Clark Art Institute and at the J. Paul Getty Museum.

Emerson Bowyer

Emerson Bowyer

Nineteenth-century visual culture; art and technology; law and the image; histories of paperwork and bureaucracy

Emerson is currently an Andrew W. Mellon Curatorial Fellow at the Frick Collection, New York. There he will complete his dissertation, "Numismatic Modernity: Economies of Representation in France, 1800-1840," which pursues the pre-history of our current financial "crisis." It considers the production and consumption of medals, monuments, and monetary objects in a period driven by—seemingly antagonistic—experiences of heightened historical consciousness, on the one hand, and the future-oriented abstractions of speculative finance, on the other.

Recent publications include "Monographic Impressions," in Reconsidering Gérôme (Scott Allan and Mary Morton, eds., Getty Publications, 2010), and a review of Victor Stoichita's The Pygmalion Effect: From Ovid to Hitchcock (Visual Resources 26:2 [2010]). Emerson is also the editor of a forthcoming special issue of Grey Room, focused on nineteenth-century technologies of reproduction. He holds a B.A. and a law degree from the University of Sydney, Australia.

Rachel Boyd

Rachel Boyd

Italian Renaissance Art and Architecture; 18th- and 19th-Century Italian Architecture and Landscape

Rachel studies Italian Renaissance art and architecture. In spring 2013, she was an exchange student at the Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität in Munich, Germany. Rachel earned her M.Phil. from the University of Cambridge in 2010, where she was a Gates Cambridge Scholar. At Cambridge, she wrote her dissertation on a nineteenth-century Roman villa, and her studies focused on eighteenth- and nineteenth-century Italian and British architecture and landscape architecture; she maintains an active interest in this field. Rachel earned her B.A. from Yale University in 2009, where she double-majored in the history of art and Italian. She has held internships at the Metropolitan Museum of Art (Robert Lehman Collection), the Yale University Art Gallery and the Frick Collection, and most recently worked at a boutique litigation firm in New York City.

Thomas Ian Campbell

Thomas Ian Campbell

Thomas Ian Campbell studies modern and contemporary art, with a focus on post-WWII art in Europe and America. He received his B.A. in Art History and Comparative Literature from Binghamton University in 2008. His research interests include the history of technology, print and media distribution, and sound. He is currently at work on his dissertation, which analyzes three audiocassette 'magazines'—Audio Arts, Tellus, and New Wilderness Audiographics—and their relationship to alternative spaces and post-conceptual art practices.

Raymond Carlson

Raymond Carlson

Raymond specializes in Italian Renaissance and Baroque art. He received his B.A. (Magna Cum Laude, Phi Beta Kappa) from Yale University in 2011 with a double major in Art History and Italian. As a recipient of the Paul Mellon Fellowship from 2011-13, Raymond completed two consecutive M.Phil.s at the University of Cambridge in Italian and Art History.

Emogene Cataldo

Emogene S. Cataldo

Medieval Art & Architecture; Digital Humanities

Emogene studies late medieval art, architecture, and urban identity. She received her B.A. (Magna Cum Laude, Phi Beta Kappa) with Distinction in Studio Art in 2010 from Carleton College, where she was also a recipient of the Larson International Fellowship. Prior to entering the Ph.D. program in 2014, Emogene collaborated with several museums through her work in interactive design and art education, including the Walker Art Center, the Smithsonian Institution, the Asian Art Museum of San Francisco, the Krannert Art Museum, and the University of Michigan Museum of Art.

Karin Christiaens

Karin Christiaens

Ancient Greek and Roman Art and Archaeology

Karin is a second year PhD student interested in the study of the eastern Mediterranean under the Roman Empire, particularly with respect to cross-cultural interactions and the interplay of continuity and change. She graduated magna cum laude from The College of New Jersey (B.A., Art History and English, 2010) and The University of Chicago (A.M., Humanities: Classical Art and Archaeology, 2011). Her Master's thesis "Visual Culture of the Second Sophistic: Implications for Identity in Roman Athens," explored the complex political and cultural relationship, negotiated in part through visual means, between Greece and Rome in the early Imperial period. Prior to entering the PhD program, Karin received a Post-baccalaureate certificate in Greek and Latin from the Classics Department at Columbia University (2013). She has excavated at the Athenian Agora (2011-2013); the Columbia APAHA excavations at Hadrian's Villa (2014-2015) under the direction of Prof. de Angelis and Prof. Maiuro; as well as the Columbia excavations at the Sanctuary of Poseidon at Onchestos in Boeotia (2014-2015) under the direction of Prof. Mylonopoulos, where she will serve as a site supervisor beginning in the 2016 season.

Olivia Clemens

Arts of Islamic world; History of collecting; Historiography 

Olivia studies the arts of the Islamic world, and is particularly interested in cross-cultural exchange in the early modern period, historiography, and the history of collecting and display. Prior to coming to Columbia, she was a Research Assistant in the Art of the Middle East department at LACMA, where she worked on LACMA's Damascus Room project. She received her BA in Art History from UCLA. 

Sonia Coman

Sonia Coman

Eighteenth- and Nineteenth-Century French Art; Japanese Art; the History of Collecting

Sonia received her BA in Art History with a Secondary Field in Studio Art from Harvard University (Magna cum Laude, Phi Beta Kappa). She worked as a student docent for the Harvard Art Museums and as a curatorial intern in the Department of Paintings at the Louvre Museum. Since joining the PhD program at Columbia, Sonia received MA and MPhil degrees, traveled to Paris for research on an Alliance Program Doctoral Mobility Grant, and wrote reviews of contemporary art. Her dissertation explores how the reinvention of French ceramics under the influence of Japanese art contributed to the emergence of modernism. Sonia is an avid reader and writer of Japanese verse. Her poetry has been awarded and published internationally. She is fluent in Italian, Romanian, French, and Japanese.

Emily Margaret Cook

Emily Margaret Cook

Roman art and archaeology; materiality, artistic materials, and production

Emily is a Ph.D. Candidate in Columbia University's Art History and Archaeology Department. Her research focuses on Roman art and archaeology of the late republic and empire. She is currently working on a dissertation that investigates the Roman characterization of sculptural media through, first, the study of sculptural copies which are extant in more than one medium and, second, the examination of 1st and 2nd century AD texts that articulate media-oriented systems of value. Funding for her research has included a Jacob K. Javits fellowship. Emily has been an archaeological trench supervisor for the inaugural 2014 season of the Hadrian's Villa excavation project of APAHA of Columbia University. She also excavated for two seasons, in the summers 2011 and 2012, at the Villa San Marco in Castellammare di Stabia, Italy with APAHA. Emily earned a B.A. in Classics and the History of Art from Johns Hopkins University in 2009. As an undergraduate, Emily worked as Curatorial Assistant at the Johns Hopkins University Archaeological Collection (now Museum) and as an intern in the curatorial department of the Walters Art Museum.

Lindsay Cook

Lindsay Cook

Medieval Art and Architecture; 18th- and 19th-century medieval architectural revivalism

Lindsay is an advanced Ph.D. candidate specializing in Gothic architecture. Her dissertation considers the role of the cathedral chapter of Notre-Dame of Paris in the construction of parish churches in the Paris region. She earned her M.A. (2013) and M.Phil. (2014) from Columbia and her B.A. in Art History and French from Vassar College (2010). As an undergraduate, she wrote a thesis about projects--including one by Philip Johnson--for a new chapel at Vassar in the 1950s, and she worked for two summers at Frank Lloyd Wright's Robie House. Before entering the Ph.D. program in 2011, Lindsay contributed to an exhaustive public sculpture database for the Chicago Park District, worked on the 2011 French Decorative Arts Symposium at the Alliance Française de Chicago, and served as a panorama photographer for Mapping Gothic France. Her M.A. paper at Columbia considered the propaganda value of photography in a 1919 book about Reims Cathedral. She contributed to the Rare Book and Manuscript Library exhibition of medieval Bibles Writing the Word, the digital humanities project Chant Manuscripts, and the print catalogue for The Architect's Library, an exhibition of notable architectural books from the collection at Vassar. She is currently a consultant for FAB-Musiconis, a collaborative digital humanities project in medieval musical iconography. As a complement to her research, Lindsay has coordinated undergraduate study trips to Amiens and Jerusalem for art history travel seminars and served as the program assistant for interdisciplinary Columbia summer programs in Paris and Venice.

Vivian Crockett

Vivian Crockett

Modern and Contemporary Art; Queer and Gender Theory; Latin America and Diasporas; African Diaspora

Vivian Crockett joined Columbia as a PhD student in 2012, having completed her B.A. in Art History at Stanford University in 2006. Her M.A. thesis focused on questions of race and class in the development, reception, and evolution of Hélio Oiticica's Parangolé series. Her work focuses largely on art of African diasporas, (Afro)Latinx diasporas, and Latin America at the varied intersections of race, gender, and queer theory. Vivian has previously worked at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, where she held a three-year position as a research assistant in the museum's Painting and Sculpture department. She was a collective member and editor of Aorta Magazine (2010-12), an arts publication that showcased the work of queer and transgender artists, and has recently contributed writing to Visual AIDS. She works as an independent researcher and curator, and in 2015 was a guest curator for Dirty Look's biennial On Location series, a month-long series of site-specific screenings of queer cinema around New York City. 

Nicholas Croggon

Nicholas Croggon

Nicholas Croggon is the Turza Family Fellow in the Department of Art History & Archaeology at Columbia University, where he is completing his PhD in modern and contemporary art. Nicholas graduated with first class honours in art history and law from the University of Melbourne, and previously worked as a public interest lawyer.  He is the co-founder and co-editor of the Australian contemporary art journal Discipline

Carrie Cushman

Carrie Cushman

Japanese Modern Art and Architecture

Carrie Cushman graduated from Vanderbilt University with a B.A. in Art History, and she holds a certificate in Japanese from Cornell University. She joined Columbia as a Ph.D. student in 2011 and received her M.Phil. in 2014. She specializes in Modern Japanese Art and Architecture, with research interests in modern ruins, the aesthetics of disaster, urban redevelopment, and the role of ruins, both natural and man-made, in narratives of postwar history. Her dissertation focuses on the photographer Miyamoto Ryūji, whose images of ruins engage multiple layers of trauma in the contemporary Japanese experience. Carrie was the recipient of the 2014-15 Meyerson Teaching Award in Art Humanities. During the 2015-16 academic year, she will be conducting research for her dissertation as a Fulbright Graduate Research Fellow in Japan.

Sophia D'Addio

Sophia D'Addio

Renaissance Art and Architecture; Intersections between Art and Music

Sophia D’Addio graduated from Colgate University with a B.A. in Creative Writing and Medieval & Renaissance Studies, and she holds M.A. degrees in Italian (Middlebury College), Violin/Viola Performance (Queens College), and Art History (University of Pennsylvania). She joined the doctoral program at Columbia in 2011, and received her M.Phil. in 2013. Her dissertation on painted organ shutters produced in Renaissance Italy aims to establish a new interpretive framework for these understudied objects, akin to the doors of a triptych, in light of their original musico-liturgical context. Sophia is currently conducting research in Italy on a Mellon Humanities International Travel Fellowship (GSAS); during the 2015-16 academic year, she will continue her dissertation research in Venice as the recipient of a Gladys Krieble Delmas Foundation Grant. Sophia also spends her summers working for Columbia’s study abroad program in Venice, for which she has served as both program assistant and instructor for the course “Art in Venice: Torcello to Tiepolo.” 

Catherine Damman

Catherine Damman

Modern and Contemporary Art

Catherine’s research focuses on performance and the history of art, including experimental dance, theater, film, and music. Her writing has been commissioned by institutions such as the Walker Art Center, the ICA London, and MoMA PS1 and publications such as Art Journal, Women & Performance, Art in America, and Artforum online. Her article, “Dance, Sound, Word: The ‘Hundred-Jointed Body’ in Zurich Dada Performance,” is forthcoming in The Germanic Review. Catherine is completing her dissertation—on the entanglements of narrative, media, and performance in American art of the 1970s—as the 2016–2018 Chester Dale Fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts (CASVA).

Michaela de Lacaze

Michaela de Lacaze

Latin American Modern and Contemporary art

Michaela de Lacaze, a second-year student, studies Latin American Modern and Contemporary art and is particularly interested in Brazilian and Argentinean art of the postwar period. She received her B.A. in History of Art and Architecture from Harvard University in 2007. She has worked at the New Museum of Contemporary Art, the Smithsonian American Art Museum, and the Institute of Contemporary Art in Boston.

Alessandra Di Croce

Alessandra Di Croce

Italian Renaissance Art

Alessandra Di Croce, a fourth-year student, specializes in Italian Renaissance Art; her research interests are focused on the relationship between visual arts and religious issues in late 16th/early 17th century Italy, within a context of important cultural transformations at the dawn of modern thought.

Her dissertation analyzes the impact that collections of Early Christian and Medieval art objects in post-Tridentine Rome had on the development of a new understanding and appreciation of earlier art, as well as on the paleo-Christian revival of the late 16th/early 17th century in Rome. Alessandra received her BA and MA (Scuola di Specializzazione) from the University of Rome "La Sapienza". From 2001 to 2005 she collaborated with the "Soprintendenza Speciale per il Polo Museale Romano", participating in several cataloguing projects and in the organization of the exhibition Il Settecento a Roma (Rome, Palazzo di Venezia, November 2005–February 2006). Alessandra has also published with Italian journals (Bollettino d'Arte, Ricerche di Storia dell'Arte, Neoclassico), and written catalogue entries for several exhibition catalogues (Il Gran Teatro del Mondo. L'Anima e il Volto del Settecento, Milan 2003; Il Settecento a Roma, Rome 2005–2006; GOYA e la tradizione italiana, Parma 2006; San Nicola da Tolentino nell'arte. Corpus iconografico, Tolentino 2006, vol. II).

Xiaohan Du

Xiaohan Du

Chinese painting and calligraphy

Xiaohan studies the history of Chinese art and Japanese art, with a focus on the pre-modern period. She received her B.A. with Honors in Art History from Hamilton College in 2012, with a minor in History. She studied French and European art in Paris, where she also had an internship with Museé Guimet. Prior to coming to Columbia in the fall following her graduation, she interned with the Chinese works of art department at Christie's New York office, as well as the Japanese and Korean painting department at the Cleveland Museum of Art in Ohio.

Ayşe Ercan

Ayse Ercan

Ayşe Ercan is an active archaeologist and a doctoral candidate in the Department of Art History and Archaeology at Columbia University. She maintains a wide range of research interests that include settlement archaeology, trade in the medieval world, and interactions between cultural heritage and modern cityscapes in Turkey. She holds a B.A. in Archaeology from Istanbul University (2007) and a M.A. in Art History and Archaeology from Koç University, Istanbul (2010). Her Masters dissertation provided the first synthetic historical account of the harbor of Theodosios (modern-day Yenikapı, Istanbul) through a critical study of the recent archaeological excavations conducted by the Istanbul Archaeological Museums. She has participated in scholarly programs organized by Dumbarton Oaks, Kunsthistorisches Institut in Florenz, and École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales. In addition to her current research project on the Mangana complex of Constantine IX Monomachos located in Istanbul, Ercan has participated in numerous excavations in Turkey such as Perge, Sagalassos, Aphrodisias, Gre Amer in Batman, Küçükyalı and Rhegion in Istanbul, and Onchestos in Greece.

Yasmine Espert

Yasmine Espert

Yasmine Espert is an Art History PhD Candidate at Columbia University. Her dissertation examines filmmaking practices in the Caribbean diaspora. She was the graduate fellow for the Digital Black Atlantic Project, a working group supported by the Center for the Study of Social Difference. Yasmine is the former Editor of sx visualities, a Small Axe Project; for their online platform she produced "MADE VULNERABLE," a Curated Project about the sensorial experience of vulnerability. She recently contributed to the Museum of Modern Art's (MoMA) Museum Research Consortium and Self-Knowledge: A History, for Oxford Philosophical Concepts. Support for her work includes a Mellon Humanities International Travel Fellowship and a Fulbright research grant.

Daria Foner

Courtney Fiske

Modern and Contemporary Art

Courtney Fiske is a fourth year specializing in 20th-century American art. She graduated from Harvard in May 2011. She is a frequent contributor to Artforum's website and Art in America. Her writing has also appeared in The Brooklyn Rail, Film Comment, and various artists' books. Her essay on Jack Burnham's theory of minimal and conceptual art as "real time systems," presented in a previous version at the 2015 IFA-Frick Symposium, is forthcoming in Grey Room. Prior to attending Columbia, she was a curatorial researcher at Dia Art Foundation, where she worked on the Carl Andre retrospective. 

Daria Foner

Daria Rose Foner

Daria Rose Foner is a doctoral student specializing in Italian Renaissance painting and sculpture. She received her B.A. from Princeton University in 2011 and her M.Phil. under the direction of Deborah Howard from the University of Cambridge in 2012. In the UK, she focused her scholarship on depictions of Saint Catherine of Alexandria and received a Brancusi Award to travel to Italy to pursue research for her Master's dissertation. During her time in Cambridge, Daria volunteered at the Fitzwilliam Museum and presented papers at conferences at the University of Birmingham and the University of Edinburgh. She has held internships at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Uffizi Gallery, and the Marianne Boesky Gallery. Prior to attending university, Daria danced with the Norwegian National Ballet.

Michael Anthony Fowler

Michael Anthony Fowler

Greek and Near Eastern art and archaeology; human sacrifice; emotional dynamics of art; material religion; archaeology and iconography of ritual; violence in art

Michael is an ABD Ph.D. candidate, currently writing a dissertation entitled "Human sacrifice in Greek antiquity: between myth, image, and reality". Since 2015 he has been an active member of Prof. Mylonopoulos' excavation at the sanctuary of Poseidon in Onchestos, and recently stepped into the role of supervisor of Site B (the administrative center). In summer 2014, Michael was Visiting Lecturer at the Institute for Classical Archaeology, Eberhard Karls University of Tübingen. Michael also interned for two consecutive summers (2011, 2012) in the Collection of Vases and Minor Arts at the National Archaeological Museum, Athens. He remains an annual contributor to the Chronique archéologique de la religion grecque (ChronARG) and Assistant Review Editor for Les Carnets de l'ACoSt (Association for Coroplastic Studies). 

Michael was educated at Columbia University (M.Phil., 2013; M.A., 2012), Tufts University (M.A., 2010), Harvard University (M.T.S., 2008), and The Colorado College (B.A., 2006). After spending the 2015-2016 academic year in Greece as an Alexander S. Onassis Foundation Fellow, Michael is excited to return to the classroom as an Art Humanities Instructor.

Robert Fucci

Robert Fucci

Renaiassance and Baroque European Art

Robert Fucci's primary research area is Dutch and Flemish art of the 17th century with a particular focus on the history of printmaking. His dissertation in progress, "Jan van e Velde II (c. 1593-1641): The Printmaker as Creative Artist in the Early Dutch Republic," focuses on the print medium as a site for innovative imagery in the years following Dutch independence. In 2015, he curated the exhibition Rembrandt's Changing Impressions for the Wallach Art Gallery. Currently he is the 2013-2016 David E. Finley Fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts (CASVA) at the National Gallery of Art.

Sofia Gans

Sofia Gans

Early Christian and Medieval Art and Architecture; Applications of Digital Technology in Teaching of Art History

Sofia Gans graduated from Vassar College in 2009 with a degree in art history and French. Her area of focus is early Christian and medieval art and architecture, specifically the relationships between objects and the built environment and the arts of pilgrimage. Additionally, Sofia spent two summers traveling to France with Columbia's Media Center for Art History, working on the Mellon-funded Mapping Gothic France research database. This project, along with a year and a half spent working in the Education department of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, also gave Sofia a strong interest in teaching art history in both a classroom and museum setting, specifically applications of new technology to further access and engagement with objects and sites.

William T. Gassaway

William T. Gassaway

Pre-Columbian Art and Architecture

William earned his B.A. in Art History from the University of New Mexico, where he wrote his undergraduate thesis on the commodification of Maya cultural patrimony. Now, as a doctoral candidate in pre-Columbian art history, William is largely engaged with indigenous representations of the body and the cosmos in ancient Mexico. He has deep interests in Latin American modernism, antiquarianism, phenomenology, and the visual culture of the American Southwest as well.

In his dissertation, titled "Extraordinary Bodies: Divine Deformation among the Aztecs (AD 1350-1521),” William offers the first expressly art historical discussion of the forms, contexts and meanings of aggrieved and misshapen bodies within the arts of Central Mexico.

Beth Gollnick

Beth Gollnick

Feminism, photography, film, installation art, expanded cinema

Beth Gollnick studies modern and contemporary art with a special interest in photography and film. Her work focuses on issues related to feminism, institutional critique, materiality/dematerialization, and spatial politics. Beth received her BA with honors in Art History and English from the University of California, Los Angeles, where her undergraduate thesis received an Award for Scholastic Excellence.

Alexandra Helprin

Alexandra Helprin

Russia between Peter I and 1917, Reception of Classical Antiquity, Neoclassicism and its Detractors

Alexandra Helprin specializes in the art of Russia between 1700 and 1917. Her dissertation is about the artistic projects of the Sheremetev family, Ivan and Nikolai Argunov, and, more broadly, the effects of serfdom on Russian visual art, patronage, and collecting during the late eighteenth century. She received an A.B. in classical archaeology from Harvard in 2007.

Nina Horisaki-Christens

Nina Horisaki-Christens

Nina Horisaki-Christens entered the PhD program in 2013, and her current research focuses on histories of Japanese performance and media art from the late 1960s through the 1970s. Prior to entering Columbia's PhD program, she was a 2012-13 Helena Rubinstein Curatorial Fellow in the Whitney Museum's Independent Study Program, for which she co-curated Maintenance Required at The Kitchen, and she also worked as Research Assistant for Gutai: Splendid Playground at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum. As Assistant Curator and Interim Program Manager at Art in General, she curated exhibitions, residencies, and commissions with New York-based and Eastern European emerging artists. Horisaki-Christens was a 2008-09 Lori Ledis Curatorial Fellow at BRIC Rotunda Gallery, and Summer 2013 Curator-in-Residence at Seoul Art Space Geumcheon (Korea). She has contributed to publications produced by The Whitney Museum of American Art, Independent Curators International, Art21.com, Flux Factory, and Art in General. She holds a B.F.A. in Sculpture and Japanese Language and Literature from Washington University in St. Louis.

Chen Jiang

Chen Jiang

Modern Japanese Art

Chen Jiang is a first-year PhD student studying modern Japanese art. Her research focuses on the artistic interactions between Japan and China during the Meiji period. She is also interested in tourist photography, export art, and art exhibitions of modern Japan. She graduated summa cum laude from Amherst College in 2015 with a B.A. in History of Art. She then received her M.St. in History of Art & Visual Culture from Oxford University in 2016, where she examined in her dissertation the artistic career of the nanga painter Noguchi Shōhin. Prior to entering Columbia, she has held internships at the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston, Mead Art Museum, Pace Gallery, and Ullens Center for Contemporary Art.

Rattanamol Johal

Rattanamol Singh Johal

Modern and Contemporary Art

Rattan entered the doctoral program in 2013 after earning a BA (summa cum laude) in Art History & Political Science at the Macaulay Honors College, CUNY (2009) and an MA (with Distinction) at the Courtauld Institute of Art, London (2011). He is currently the C-MAP Asia Fellow in the Department of Media and Performance Art at MoMA and the Helena Rubinstein Critical Studies Fellow at the Whitney Independent Study Program. From 2016-2018, he is a collaborating curator for the Liverpool Biennial Associate Artists Program. He has previously worked in various capacities, including curator, archivist and publications editor at Khoj International Artists' Association in New Delhi. Interested in exploring the afterlives of the documentary mode, he examines artistic practices from around the globe that continue to critically push the genre into speculative, fictive, forensic, and other terrains.

Subhashini Kaligotla

Jeewon Kim

Jeewon studies the history of Japanese art and architecture. Her research focuses on urbanization in Korea under Japanese colonial rule and visual cultures of Japanese imperialism. She received her A.B. with honors in Art History from Dartmouth College and a Master’s from the University of Chicago, where she examined the depiction of political events in Meiji prints for her thesis. Jeewon has worked for Leeum Samsung Museum of Art on various exhibitions as a project-based researcher and translator, and held internships at The Museum of Modern Art and the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum. Her studies have been supported by fellowships and grants from Dartmouth College, The Korea Foundation, Weatherhead East Asian Institute, and the Ichiro Shirato Fund. This year, she will be serving as a Teaching Fellow for Asian Art Humanities. 

Clare Kobasa

Clare Kobasa

Italian Renaissance and Baroque; British Art; Printmaking/Print Culture

Clare graduated with a BA in 2010 from Swarthmore College with a double major in history and art history. She has interned in the print departments at the Yale University Art Gallery, the Art Institute of Chicago, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, and the Philadelphia Museum of Art. As a fellow at the Slought Foundation in 2010-2011 she was the research assistant for "Architecture on Display." Other research interests include the Gallery of Maps in the Vatican, the relationship between English and Chinese gardening and landscaping practices in the eighteenth century, Roman mosaics in Sicily, and southern Italian Renaissance art.

Ani Kodzhabasheva

Ani Kodzhabasheva

Modern Architecture

Ani is a second-year Ph.D. student focusing on topics in the history of modern architecture. She holds a B.A. in Art History and Philosophy (with departmental honors in both disciplines and general honors) from Vassar College and a Master's in Art History, with distinction, from the University of Oxford. For her Master's, she was awarded a studentship by the British Arts and Humanities Research Council. Ani has also received fellowships from Vassar College and the German Academic Exchange Council (DAAD), as well as research grants from the German History Society in the UK and the Weatherhead East Asian Institute at Columbia.  Ani is interested in comparative twentieth century Modernisms. She is co-organizing the Collins/Kaufmann Forum for Modern Architectural History

Tara Kuruvilla

Tara Kuruvilla

Museums in Colonial and Postcolonial India; Historiography; South Asian Modern and Contemporary Art

Tara Kuruvilla is a second-year PhD student with research interests in colonial studies, the history of collecting and display in South Asia, and art historical historiography. She holds a B.A. in Art History from New York University, and an M.A. in Modern Art: Critical and Curatorial Studies from Columbia University. While enrolled in the MODA program, Tara co-curated a curious blindness at the Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Art Gallery. The exhibition reflected upon a moment captured by eighteen early to mid-career artists who engage with the complex climate of race and identity politics in a purportedly postracial era.

Tara has held internships at Christie's, Haunch of Venison and The Rubin Museum of Art. She has also had cataloging experience; organizing the photographic and written records of H.W. Janson at the Grey Art Fine Arts Library and the American Viewbooks collection at the Avery Architectural and Fine Arts Library. Prior to joining Columbia, Tara worked as a Curatorial Assistant at the Dr. Bhau Daji Lad Museum, Mumbai and as a Floater at Sotheby's, New York.

Rozemarijn Landsman

Rozemarijn Landsman

Rozemarijn Landsman specializes in the Dutch seventeenth century. She received her B.A. and M.A. in the History of Art from the University of Amsterdam, followed by an M.A. from the Courtauld Institute of Art in London. Previously, she was the Joseph F. McCrindle Curatorial Intern at the National Gallery of Art in Washington D.C., and she has held graduate internships at various other institutions, including the Amsterdam Museum, the J. Paul Getty Museum in Los Angeles, and the Morgan Library and Museum.

Adam Harris Levine

Adam Harris Levine

Medieval European Art

Adam Harris Levine studies medieval European art. He received his MA in the History of Art from the Courtauld Institute of Art, London, where he wrote his dissertation on gothic ivories. His masters research recently appeared in the Sculpture Journal (2014). Adam received his BA in Art History and Spanish Literature from McGill University, Montreal, Quebec. At Columbia, his research focuses on late medieval sculpture and decorative arts.

Natasha Marie Llorens

Natasha Marie Llorens

Modern and Contemporary Art

Natasha Marie Llorens' doctoral research is focused on Algerian national cinema and representations of revolutionary violence in the 1960s and 1970s. She works as independent curator based in New York and her recent projects include "Threshing Floors" at Cuchifritos Gallery on the Lower East Side and "Frames of War" at Momenta Art in Brooklyn. She is a graduate of the Center for Curatorial Studies at Bard College. 

Francesca Marzullo

Francesca Marzullo

Medieval and Early Modern Italian Art

Francesca specializes in medieval and Renaissance Italian art with a secondary interest in eighteenth- and nineteenth-century American painting. Before joining Columbia's doctoral program in 2010, she received a B.A. in art history and English from Williams College, an M.Phil. in English from the University of Cambridge, and an M.A. in art history from the University of Pennsylvania. She is currently writing her dissertation, which examines Italian overdoors in the period ca. 1100-ca. 1500, as a predoctoral fellow at the Kunsthistorisches Institut in Florenz - Max-Planck-Institut.

Nomaduma Masilela

Nomaduma Rose Masilela

Modern and Contemporary African Art; Art Theory; Postcolonial Theory; Comparative Art Histories

Nomaduma Masilela is a second-year PhD candidate who studies modern and contemporary art from Africa and the Diaspora. She is a Ford Pre-Doctoral Fellow and a Mellon Mays Undergraduate Fellow.

Nomaduma received her BA from Barnard College (2007). She was a Curatorial Fellow at The Kitchen, New York (2007-08) and conducted independent research in Dakar, Senegal as a Mortimer Hays Brandeis Traveling Fellow (2008-09) before arriving at Columbia University.

Arathi Menon

Arathi Menon

Arathi is a fifth-year PhD candidate studying South Asian art history with a concentration in the Hindu temple and medieval architecture. She received her B.A. from UC San Diego with a thesis entitled "The Value of Choice: Assigning Values to Commodities of Art” for which she won the Afsahi award. At Columbia, her  M.A. thesis (2013) established a firm provenance within ancient India for an ivory statuette excavated in the city of Pompeii. Arathi received her M.Phil. in 2014 with a focused study of medieval South Indian temple style, saints and temple networks, and the High-Gothic cathedrals of France. She is a Weatherhead East Asian Institute-SLYFF Fellow and two-time recipient of the Steven Kossak Graduate Fellowship in Indian Art. Arathi’s dissertation, currently in progress, explores the development of the sacred art and architecture of medieval Kerala. Her dissertation research is generously supported by the Riggio Fellowship in Art History (2015 - 2016) and the American Institute of Indian Studies (2016 - 2017). 

Michael Muehlbauer

Mikael Muehlbauer

Western Medieval and Byzantine art and architecture

Mikael Muehlbauer is a PhD candidate and teaching fellow in the department of Art History and Archaeology at Columbia University in the fields of Western Medieval and Byzantine art and architecture. He received his bachelor of arts in history with highest honors in Byzantine and Modern Greek studies from Queens College CUNY in 2014 (summa cum laude, phi beta kappa) and a Master's degree from Columbia University in Art History (2015). At Columbia, his doctoral research is focused on rock-cut architecture in Medieval Ethiopia and Byzantium. He has previously been the recipient of fellowships from Koç University in Istanbul, the Smithsonian Institution, the National Science foundation and the CUNY graduate center.

Maggie Mustard

Maggie Mustard

Modern and contemporary Japanese art; Japanese photography and film; Critical theory; Representations of World II and the atomic bomb; Postwar Japanese visual culture

Maggie studies modern Japanese art history, with a particular focus on photography from the twentieth century. Her dissertation, currently in progress, is entitled “Atlas Novus: Kawada Kikuji, The Map, and Postwar Japanese Photography.” It examines the early work of the photographer Kawada Kikuji as a lens through which to illuminate issues of image theory, memory, and alienation in post-World War II Japanese society. Maggie previously received her B.A. in Honors Art History and East Asian Studies from Brown University (2007), and her M.A. in Liberal Studies from the New School for Social Research (2010). Her dissertation research has been generously supported by a Riggio Fellowship in Art History (2013) and a Mellon Humanities International Travel Fellowship (2014). Maggie has interned at the Smithsonian Institution’s Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery, and served as research associate at the Art Loss Register and the Ronin Gallery.

Steven Niedbala

Steven Niedbala

Modern Architecture; Media Theory

Steven Niedbala entered the PhD program at Columbia in 2013 after completing his B.A. at Oberlin College. At Oberlin, he completed an honors thesis on post-industrial urbanism in the city of Pittsburgh and worked for numerous arts organizations, including the Allen Memorial Art Museum and the Modern Music Guild at the Oberlin Conservatory. His current research focuses on Appalachian urban networks as well as the impact of anti-psychiatry movements upon institutional architecture in post-war North America.

Matt Peebles

Matt Peebles

Ancient Greek Art and Archaeology

Matt is a PhD candidate in ancient art history and archaeology. He received his bachelor's degree from Cornell University and spent several years as a teacher in NYC before beginning the PhD program at Columbia. Matt now specializes in ancient Greek art, having received his M.A. in 2013 and his M.Phil in 2014; he is currently at work on his doctoral dissertation, which explores the image of the attacking body in a variety of contexts. He has interned for three summers at the National Archaeological Museum in Athens, and is also active in Professor Mylonopoulos' archaeological field project in Onchestos, Greece. Matt has served as a guest instructor of ancient Greek art at the Eberhard Karls University, Tübingen, and he is currently an Art Humanities preceptor.

Turkan Pilavci

Turkan Pilavci

Art and archaeology of the ancient Near East

Turkan is a PhD student, specializing in the art and archaeology of the ancient Near East. She received her B.A. in Political Science and History from Bogazici University, Istanbul in 2006. She completed her M.A. in the Archeology of the Eastern Mediterranean in K.U. Leuven in 2007. Having participated in numerous field projects, since 2007 she has been a part of the Tarsus Gozlukule Archaeology Project, Turkey.

Leah Pires

Leah Pires

Modern & Contemporary Art

Leah Pires is a doctoral candidate in the department and a recent Helena Rubinstein Critical Studies Fellow at the Whitney Independent Study Program. Her dissertation, currently in progress, examines new modes of authorship and critique emergent at the turn of the 1980s through the work of Louise Lawler and her collaborators. Leah has presented research at the Whitney Museum of American Art, published writing in Triple Canopy, and will contribute an essay to a forthcoming monograph on the work of Rochelle Goldberg. She curated the exhibitions In Place Of (2016) and Conspicuous Unusable (2013) at Miguel Abreu Gallery, and a curatorial project derived from her dissertation research will open at Columbia’s Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Art Gallery in 2017. 

Eszter Polonyi

Central-Eastern European art, film and cultural theory from 1890s to 1930s, historiography, theories of the avant- and rear-garde, ideas of formalism, radical politics and an aesthetic of resistance

Eszter is interested in the historical emergence of cinema in realms of aesthetic, technical and scientific discourse. With training in Central-European and nineteenth-century aesthetics, her interests include the culture of experiment among the interwar avant-garde, issues of scale, the visual culture of revolution, theories of automatism, evolution and animal-machines, and critical theory. Her dissertation is called "Close-Up: Bela Balazs and an Aesthetic of Distance in Early Cinema Aesthetics," the first chapter of which was published in Apertura in 2012. She is currently in Europe on a travel fellowship.

Daniel Ralston

Daniel, a third-year doctoral student, specializes in the art and visual culture of nineteenth-century Spain and Latin America. He catalogued a number of the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s little-studied nineteenth-century Spanish works during a curatorial internship in the Department of European Paintings, and has also carried out research for several exhibitions at the Brooklyn Museum, including Impressionism and the Caribbean: Francisco Oller and His Transatlantic World. Daniel earned his BA in Art History and Spanish at the University of British Columbia.

Michael Sanchez

Michael Sanchez is completing his dissertation on a systemic shift in the mediation of art between Northern Europe and America at the turn of the 1970s. Laying the groundwork for much of what was to come in the following decades, this shift began with an apparently insignificant logistical inversion: rather than importing the works of American artists, dealers in Germany, beginning with Konrad Fischer, imported these artists themselves. His dissertation traces the unexpected ramifications of this inversion, far beyond the realm of logistics, through a series of projects undertaken by a handful of "agents" in the years after 1967, including Fischer, Kasper Koenig, and collectors in the Netherlands. He is also currently at work on an essay for the catalogue raisonné of Martin Kippenberger.

Joseph Scheier-Dolberg

Joseph Scheier-Dolberg

Chinese painting and calligraphy; Chinese decorative objects; modern and contemporary ink painting in China

Joseph Scheier-Dolberg studies the history of Chinese art, with a focus on painting. He received his BA from Swarthmore College in 2000 and his MA from Harvard University in 2005. In between, he spent time in Sichuan Province studying the history of Tibetan mural painting in a monastery on the border of the Tibet Autonomous Region. Prior to coming to Columbia in 2009, he spent several years working in the Chinese art department at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.

Joseph Scheier-Dolberg

David Schneller

Ancient Greek and Ancient Near Eastern Art and Archaeology

David Schneller is a PhD candidate interested in artistic exchange and interaction in the eastern Mediterranean during the early first millennium B.C. His dissertation explores "foreign" votive dedications in Greek sanctuaries. David is the 2016-2017 Heinrich Schliemann Fellow at the American School of Classical Studies at Athens. During 2015-2016, he was the Hagop Kevorkian Curatorial Fellow in the Department of Ancient Near Eastern Art at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. David graduated cum laude from New York University (B.A., Classics and Fine Arts, 2011) and received certificates in Greek and Latin from the University of Pennsylvania (2012). He has excavated at the Athenian Agora (2010-2013) and since 2014 he has served as a site supervisor under the direction of Professor Mylonopoulos at Columbia's Onchestos Excavation Project in Boeotia, Greece.

Abbe Schriber

Abbe Schriber

Modern and contemporary art; African-American art and art of the African diaspora; media and performance

Abbe Schriber entered the PhD program in Art History and Archaeology in Fall 2013. She studies modern and contemporary art, looking at identity formation, black aesthetics, and the politics of representation in conceptual art and performance from the 1960s-1980s. 
Previously, she was Curatorial Assistant at The Studio Museum in Harlem, where she coordinated exhibitions and didactic materials. There her curatorial projects included the permanent collection exhibition Body Language (2013-14), a solo exhibition presenting the work of Mendi + Keith Obadike (2013) and an installation celebrating the tenth anniversary of the museum’s “Harlem Postcards” series (2012-13). She contributes regularly to artforum.comArt in America, and The Brooklyn Rail, and recently published an essay in the exhibition catalogue for the exhibition Romare Bearden: A Black Odyssey (2014). Abbe has also contributed texts to Studio Museum publications including Speaking of People: Ebony, Jet and Contemporary Art (2014), Charles Gaines: Gridwork 1974-1989 (2014), When The Stars Begin to Fall: Imagination and the American South (2014), The Shadows Took Shape (2013), Fore (2013), and Re:Collection: Selections from The Studio Museum in Harlem (2012). She received her BA from Oberlin College in 2009.

Siddhartha V. Shah

Siddhartha V. Shah

Siddhartha V. Shah received his BA in art history from The Johns Hopkins University (2000) and MA in East-West Psychology from the California Institute of Integral Studies (2003) with an emphasis on Hindu philosophy from a Jungian perspective.  He has been an art dealer for 15 years, specializing exclusively in Hindu and Buddhist art of the Kathmandu Valley since 2005, and has written for numerous publications including Art Asia Pacific Magazine, MargNamarupa, and Orientations. His academic interests include theories and uses of ornament in British India, Tantric cults of the Divine Feminine, and late 19th century French and British painting. Siddhartha is also a yoga instructor and serves on the Editorial Board of Illumine, a Chicago-based publication focused on yoga, wellness and psychospiritual development. His research has been supported by the Steven Kossak Graduate Fellowship in South Asian/Indian Art (2014 & 2016), the Dr. Lee MacCormick Edwards Doctoral Summer Fellowship (2015), a Foreign Language Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowship (2015), and a grant from the Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art (2016).

Rachel Silveri

Rachel Silveri

Modern and Contemporary Art

Rachel Silveri studies modern and contemporary art and has a broad interest in the thematic of the everyday across the historic and neo-avant-gardes. She received her B.A. in History of Art and Gender Studies from the University of Michigan in 2008 and was awarded an M.A. from Columbia in 2010.

Rachel Silveri

Teresa Soley

Early Netherlandish painting; Late Medieval and Early Modern Iberian art; artistic exchange in the Age of Discoveries

Teresa Soley is a first-year Ph.D. student focusing on Early Netherlandish painting and the concurrent art of Iberia, particularly Portugal. She holds a B.A. in Art History and Latin American and Caribbean Studies from Washington and Lee University, and a R.M.A. in Art History of the Low Countries in its European Context from Universiteit Utrecht.

Teresa interned at the Groeningemuseum and Sint-Janshospitaal in Bruges before beginning at Columbia. She collaborated on the exhibitions Memling. Rinasciamento fiammingo held at the Scuderie del Quirinale in Rome, and Faces Then: Renaissance Portraits from the Low Countries at the Palais des Beaux-Arts in Brussels. She also contributed to the catalogue for L'Homme, Le Dragon et la Mort: La Gloire de Saint Georges, an exhibition surveying the depiction of St. George in Northern European art as part of Mons 2015: European Capital of Culture.

Jacob Stavis

Jacob Stavis

Ancient Near Eastern Art and Archaeology, Egyptian Art, Historiography

Jake is a third year student focusing on the art and archaeology of the ancient near East and Egypt. He is especially interested in the reception and reuse of cultural heritage in the Middle East. Prior to entering the PhD program, Jake graduated magna cum laude from Columbia with a BA in art history and linguistics, writing an honors thesis on the relationship between image and text in early Mesopotamian kudurrus and glyptic. He has interned at the Metropolitan Museum of Art and Pierpont Morgan Library, and has excavated with the University of Edinburgh's Prastio Mesorotsos expedition and Boğaziçi University's Tarsus Gözlükule project, where he served as a trench supervisor.

Hwanhee Suh

Hwanhee Suh

Chinese painting and calligraphy, Japanese pictorial art, Korean pre-modern art and aesthetics

Hwanhee is planning to explore, through the prism of rivalry, the lives and activities of seventeenth-century Chinese painters, most of whom competed for recognition from eminent patrons, art markets, and aesthetic publics. He is also deeply interested in history of Chinese album paintings with a keen focus on the possibilities and limitations of the painting format.
Hwanhee received his B.A. degree in Aesthetics (2007) and M.A. in Art History (2011) from Seoul National University with his MA thesis, "The Invention of a Masterpiece: The Life and Afterlife of Dong Qichang's (1555-1636) Wanluan Thatched Hall." In the paper Hwanhee has examined not only the painter's efforts to convey a specific message by coordinating verbal and visual languages but also the transformation of the painting's status into a masterpiece by later agents. Prior to joining Columbia in 2012, he participated in the preparation of the exhibition Silla: Korea's Golden Kingdom (2013-14) at the Metropolitan Museum of Art as a full-time intern funded by the Korea Foundation.

Molly Superfine

Molly Superfine

Modern and contemporary art; art of the African diaspora; queer and gender theory; performance and representation theory

Molly entered the PhD program in Fall 2015. She received her B.A. in art history and Spanish at Duke University in 2013. She spent the majority of her time at Duke studying modern and contemporary Latin American and Latino/a art. For her graduate studies, Molly is interested in the relationship between art and politics, specifically in the cityscape of New York from the 1970s-onwards with special attention to the AIDS Epidemic. She has developed a particular interest in the formation and exploration of identity politics vis-à-vis performance art and its photographic and filmic documentation. 

Erhan Tamur

Ancient Western Asian Art and Archaeology; Modern European Philosophy

Erhan received his M.A. in Ancient Western Asian Archaeology from Freie Universität Berlin in January 2016. His M.A. thesis focused on the sculptural art of the Syro-Anatolian city-states in the Iron Age (ca. 12 th to 7 th centuries BCE), with an emphasis on the theoretical and methodological drawbacks of correlating certain "styles" with certain "ethnicities". His other research interests include Assyrian art and architecture, art-historical and archaeological theory, and theories of subjectivity. He also works on integrating computational photography (e.g. Reflectance Transformation Imaging - RTI) into his studies.

Matthew Teti

Postwar American Art

Matthew Teti holds a B.A. from Northwestern University in Comparative Literature and an M.A. from Columbia University in Art History. He is currently at work finishing his dissertation "Chris Burden, 1967–1971," which is an in-depth study of the influential American artist's early career sculpture and performance art. "Chris Burden, 1967–1971" is part of a larger project that will historically reevaluate Burden's work from the 1970s, the first chapter of which, "Media Hijack: Chris Burden and the Logic of Terrorism," will be published in 2017. Matthew has received fellowships from the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, Columbia University and the Pierre and Tana Matisse Foundation, and he has taught in the Core Curriculum at Columbia since 2014. His broader research interest is in Californian art of the 1970s and 80s, especially sculpture, performance, conceptual, and installation art. Matthew has lived and worked in New York and Los Angeles since 2010.

Julia Vazquez

Julia Vazquez

Southern Renaissance and Baroque Art

Julia holds a B.A. (magna cum laude, Phi Beta Kappa) in the history of art and architecture from Brown University, and an M.A. and an M.Phil. in art history and archaeology from Columbia University. Her dissertation examines the curatorial career of Diego Velázquez at the court of king Philip IV of Spain, by which she aims to reconsider how Velázquez’s simultaneous careers as painter to the king and curator of the royal art collection informed one another. She has presented working excerpts from this dissertation at the Fitzwilliam Museum in Cambridge, UK, at the Kunsthistorisches Museum in Vienna, and at the Museo del Prado in Madrid. Previously, she has worked as an intern in the Département des Peintures at the Musée du Louvre and in the Curatorial Department at the Whitney Museum of American Art. She is currently the Meadows/Kress/Prado Curatorial Fellow at the Meadows Museum in Dallas, TX, and at the Museo del Prado.

Andrea Fabiola Vazquez de Arthur

Andrea Fabiola Vazquez de Arthur

Pre-Columbian Art, Architecture, and Archaeology

Andrea holds a BFA from Rhode Island School of Design (2001) and an MA in Art History from Columbia University (2009). Her interest in ancient American art history grew out of an extended period of travel throughout Central and South America. Drawing on her previous studies of visual communications, Andrea's research explores the relationship between semiotics and materiality in Andean visual culture.

Lorenzo Vigotti

Lorenzo Vigotti

Italian Renaissance Architecture

Lorenzo received his M. Arch. summa cum laude from the University of Florence in Italy in 2008 with a thesis on Florentine architecture in the late-fourteenth century entitled "The Palace of Francesco di Marco Datini in Prato." As a trained architect he worked in Florence for a firm specializing in architectural restoration and continued his research on early Renaissance architecture both in Florence and Oxford. Lorenzo joined the doctoral program at Columbia University in 2009; his research interests include the structural behavior and preservation of medieval and Renaissance buildings as well as cultural exchange between Europe and the Islamic world during the Renaissance.

Brigid von Preussen

Brigid von Preussen

Eighteenth and nineteenth-century European art, histories of design and the decorative arts, revival styles

Brigid holds a BA in Art History from Cambridge University and an MA in Cultural and Intellectual History, 1300-1650, from the Warburg Institute. Her PhD dissertation at Columbia examines the relationship between Neoclassicism, commerce, and inter-medial reproduction in late eighteenth-century British design and art, with a focus on the work produced by (and under the names of) Robert Adam, Josiah Wedgwood, and John Flaxman.

Alexis Wang

Medieval Art

Alexis Wang is a doctoral student specializing in medieval art and architecture.  She received her B.A. (Magna cum Laude, Phi Beta Kappa) in art history from New York University, where her senior thesis on the visual sources of Hildegard of Bingen's Rupertsberg Scivias won the Borgman Prize for Best Thesis in the College of Arts and Sciences.  Prior to joining Columbia, Alexis worked in the Private Sales department at Christie's, the Auctions department at Artnet, and as a curatorial intern in the Department of Medieval Art at the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Alex Weintraub

Alex Weintraub

Nineteenth-century European Painting; Modernism; History and Theory of Media

Alex Weintraub specializes in the art and visual culture of nineteenth-century Europe. His dissertation examines the material and technical supports of Vincent van Gogh’s paintings. He received his B.A. from Swarthmore College in 2011.

Leah Werier

Leah Werier

20th and 21st century art

Leah Werier is a Ph.D. candidate specializing in 20th and 21st century art. Before coming to Columbia, Leah completed an MA in 2012 at the Courtauld Institute of Art, London where she studied with Mignon Nixon PhD and visiting lecturer Juliet Mitchell on the topic of Art and Psychoanalysis: Fifty Years of War in a Time of Peace 1960-2010. She graduated with a B.F.A (Honors) from the University of Manitoba, Canada where she was awarded the Program Medal in Art History (2011).

Leah is the 2014-2015 representative for the Art History department on the Graduate Student Advisory Council, where she also serves on the Quality of Life Committee. She has also been chosen to be a Pine Tree Scholar for the academic year 2014-2015.

Robert Wiesenberger

Robert Wiesenberger

Modern and Contemporary Art, Design, and Architecture

Robert is a Critic at the Yale School of Art and the 2014–16 Stefan Engelhorn Curatorial Fellow at the Harvard Art Museums. His work focuses on modern and contemporary art, design, and architecture, especially in interwar Europe and postwar America.

Yu Yang

Yu Yang studies the history of Japanese art, with a focus on modern Japanese architecture. She received her B.A. in Film Studies from Peking University and her M.A in Art History from the University of Pittsburgh. She is currently supported by the Japan Foundation and is based at the Department of Architecture and Design at the Kyoto Institute of Technology. Her dissertation examines the dynamic interactions between the development of modernist architecture in Manchuria and Western Japan (in particular, the Hanshin-kan area) during the first half of the twentieth century.

Gillian Young

Gillian Young

Modern and Contemporary Art; Performance Studies; Media History and Theory

Gillian Young’s research charts historical confluences of visual art, performance, and media technology since the nineteenth century. She is currently at work on her dissertation, “Electric Theater: Joan Jonas and the Emergence of Performance Art in the 1970s.” The first archival study of Jonas’s early career, the project maps a genealogy of performance art rooted in the intersection of experimental theater and early video art that shaped Jonas's influential practice over the course of the decade. Gillian's writing on related topics has appeared in Art in AmericaPAJ: A Journal of Performance and Art, and TDR/The Drama Review.