Current PhD Students

Last updated on April 16, 2014.

Andrei, Talia
Applegate, Heidi
Bartel, Jens
Beach, Caitlin
Becherini, Marta
Beeny, Emily
Berninghausen, Gale
Bernstein, Margot
Bowyer, Emerson
Boyd, Rachel E.W.
Breault, Emily
Buonanno, Lorenzo
Butler, Eliza
Campbell, Thomas
Carlson, Raymond
Chamberlain, Colby
Charuhas, Christina
Chen, Anne Hunnell
Cohen, Joshua
Colard, Sandrine
Coman, Sonia
Conrad, Deborah
Conrad, Jessamyn Abigail Schafer
Cook, Emily Margaret
Cook, Lindsay
Crockett, Vivian
Croggon, Nicholas
Cuenot, Nicole
Cushman, Carrie
D'Addio, Sophia
D'Arista, Carla
Damman, Catherine
de Lacaze, Michaela
Di Croce, Alessandra
Du, Xiaohan
Dumouchelle, Kevin
Eaker, Adam
Espert, Yasmine
Feltens, Frank

Fitch, Nicholas
Fitle, Rebecca
Foner, Daria Rose
Fowler, Michael Anthony
Frobes-Cross, Nicholas
Fucci, Robert
Gannaway, Amanda
Gans, Sofia
Gassaway, William
Gollnick, Beth
Griggs, Nicole
Helprin, Alexandra
Horisaki-Christens, Nina
Kaligotla, Subhashini
Kang, Chang
Kim, Esther
Kim, SeungJung
Kobasa, Clare
Larrivé-Bass, Sandrine
LeRoux, Colette
Liebert, Emily
Llorens, Natasha Marie
Magloughlin, Amara
Majeed, Risham
Maratsos, Jessica
Marzullo, Francesca
Masilela, Nomaduma
McCarthy, Megan
Mellon, Diana
Menon, Arathi
Murrell, Denise
Mustard, Maggie
Onafuwa, Yemi
O'Neill, Rory
O'Rourke, Stephanie
Paoletti, Giulia
Parker, Jennifer
Peebles, Matt
Perkins, Elizabeth

Pilavci, Turkan
Pires, Leah
Poddar, Neeraja
Polonyi, Eszter
Redcorn, Marla
Rio, Aaron
Rivers, Tina
Rohter, Sonia
Sanchez, Michael
Sawyer, Drew
Schaefer, Sarah
Scheier-Dolberg, Joseph
Schneller, David
Schriber, Abbe
Shah, Siddhartha V.
Siemon, Julia
Silveri, Rachel
Sjøvoll, Therese
Stavis, Jacob
Stewart, Zachary D.
Suh, Hwanhee
Szalay, Gabriella
Teti, Matthew
Tolstoy, Irina
Tsai, Chun-Yi (Joyce)
Vazquez, Andrea Fabiola
Vazquez, Julia
Vigotti, Lorenzo
von Preussen, Brigid
Wager, Susan
Wang, Alexis Renee
Weintraub, Alex
Wiesenberger, Robert
Williams, Alena
Yalcin, Serdar
Yang, Yu
Yee Litt, Kori Lisa
Young, Gillian
Zarrillo, Taryn Marie

Talia Andrei

Talia Andrei

Japanese art; Momoyama-Edo period painting; narrative painting; Buddhist art

Talia is a fourth-year PhD student in Japanese art history. Her dissertation will investigate the appearance of shaji sankei mandara (shrine-temple pilgrimage mandalas) in late-medieval Japan. In particular, the juxtaposition of sacred and secular spaces, the representation of devotional practice and the context of perception for sankei mandara, viewed as they were in groups with a narrator performing before them. Talia graduated from Rutgers College with high honors in Art History. Her Columbia M.A. paper was entitled "Enlightenment According to Zen: Collapsing the Triptych in Mokuan's Four Sleepers".

Heidi Applegate

Heidi Applegate

Nineteenth-Century American Art, World's Fairs

Heidi Applegate received a B.A. in Russian from Haverford College (1993), and an M.A. in Art History from the University of Maryland (2001). She was the curatorial assistant for American and British Paintings at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC before beginning the Ph.D. program at Columbia in 2002. Her dissertation considers the ways in which the installation and interpretive practices of the fine arts exhibition at the 1915 Panama Pacific International Exposition attempted to make modern art accessible to a mass audience. Funding for her research has included a CASVA Predoctoral Fellowship for Travel Abroad for Historians of American Art, a Wyeth Predoctoral Fellowship at the Smithsonian American Art Museum, and a Henry Luce Foundation/ACLS Dissertation Fellowship in American Art.

Jens Bartel

Japanese Art; Edo period painting

Jens is a fourth-year PhD student in Japanese art history. He received his M.A. in East Asian Art History and Japanese Studies from the University of Heidelberg in 2008; his master's thesis centered on folding screen paintings by the Edo period painter Maruyama Okyo. His dissertation will investigate large-scale interior paintings on sliding doors and wall panels by the same artist, commissioned by Buddhist institutions in and around Kyoto during the latter half of the 18th century. His broader interests include the critical perception of pre-modern, particularly Edo period art during the late 19th and early 20th centuries, and the development of the art trade during the Taisho and early Showa eras.

Caitlin Beach

Caitlin Beach

American art; nineteenth century visual culture; histories of photography

Caitlin is a second year Ph.D. student focusing on 19th and early 20th century American art. She earned a B.A. from Bowdoin College in 2010, where she wrote an honors thesis on George Bellows' paintings of Maine shipbuilding. Caitlin was a curatorial intern in the American Wing of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, and has most recently been a Center for American Art Summer Fellow at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, where she contributed an entry on John Sloan to a forthcoming handbook of the Museum's collections.

Marta Becherini

Marta Becherini

South Asian Art and Architecture

Marta Becherini studied Oriental Languages and Civilizations in Venice, receiving her B.A. in Hindi from Ca' Foscari University in 2005. Prior to beginning her graduate studies at Columbia University, she spent two years working at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, first as an intern and then as research assistant in the Department of Asian Art. In 2008 she received her M.A. degree from Columbia University with a paper focusing on the cross-cultural dimension of the murals decorating a medieval Buddhist monastic complex in Ladakh. Her research interests include the issue of patronage in North Indian painting, particularly with regard to sub-imperial Mughal painting, the relationship between early Indo-Islamic architecture and the architectural traditions of Iran and Central Asia, and cultural and artistic exchanges between Europe and South Asia in early modern times.

Emily Beeny

Seventeenth- and Eighteenth-Century French Painting, Nineteenth-Century European Art, Dance, Gesture, Embodiment

Emily received her BA, MA, and MPhil in art history from Columbia. Her dissertation, Poussin and the Dance: Body and Language in Seventeenth-Century France, explores the relationship between Classical French painting and court ballet. She has published essays on Luc-Olivier Merson (in L'Étrange Monsieur Merson, Musée des Beaux-Arts de Rennes, 2008), Jean-Léon Gérôme (in Reconsidering Gérôme, Getty Publications, 2010), and Louis-Léopold Boilly (in Louis-Léopold Boilly, Palais des Beaux-Arts de Lilles, 2011) and has contributed entries on seventeenth- and eighteenth-century French works to a forthcoming catalogue of paintings in the J. Paul Getty Museum.

Gale Berninghausen

Gale Berninghausen

South Asian Art and Architecture

Gale received her B.A. in Art History from Middlebury College (Vermont) in 2005. Thereafter, she worked for the Indian and Southeast Asian Department at Sotheby's here in New York. In late 2007, she moved to Mumbai where she consulted for Pundole Art Gallery and managed Bombay Art Gallery, in addition to conducting extensive research travel throughout South India, Sri Lanka and China. During 2009 she curated an exhibition of Mughal and dasvatara ganjifa (playing cards) at Middlebury College. Subsequently, Gale managed the East Asian Studies Program at Johns Hopkins University from 2010-2011. Here at Columbia, Gale is pursuing a variety of interests in South Asian painting, sculpture and architecture, as well as a minor in Chinese painting. Gale is currently studying Hindi and Urdu languages, and is highly proficient in Spanish.

Margot Bernstein

Margot Bernstein

Margot Bernstein began the doctoral program at Columbia University in the fall of 2012. She is interested in eighteenth-century French art and visual culture. She received her B.A. in art history and history from Williams College in 2010 and her M.A. in the History of Art from the Courtauld Institute of Art in 2012. Margot spent the 2010-2011 academic year teaching English for the French Ministry of Education in Paris. She has held curatorial internships at the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Morgan Library & Museum. She has also worked as an archival intern at the Calder Foundation and as an education department intern and docent at the Williams College Museum of Art.

Emerson Bowyer

Emerson Bowyer

Nineteenth-century visual culture; art and technology; law and the image; histories of paperwork and bureaucracy

Emerson is currently an Andrew W. Mellon Curatorial Fellow at the Frick Collection, New York. There he will complete his dissertation, "Numismatic Modernity: Economies of Representation in France, 1800-1840," which pursues the pre-history of our current financial "crisis." It considers the production and consumption of medals, monuments, and monetary objects in a period driven by—seemingly antagonistic—experiences of heightened historical consciousness, on the one hand, and the future-oriented abstractions of speculative finance, on the other.

Recent publications include "Monographic Impressions," in Reconsidering Gérôme (Scott Allan and Mary Morton, eds., Getty Publications, 2010), and a review of Victor Stoichita's The Pygmalion Effect: From Ovid to Hitchcock (Visual Resources 26:2 [2010]). Emerson is also the editor of a forthcoming special issue of Grey Room, focused on nineteenth-century technologies of reproduction. He holds a B.A. and a law degree from the University of Sydney, Australia.

Rachel Boyd

Rachel Boyd

Italian Renaissance Art and Architecture; 18th- and 19th-Century Italian Architecture and Landscape

Rachel studies Italian Renaissance art and architecture. In spring 2013, she was an exchange student at the Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität in Munich, Germany. Rachel earned her M.Phil. from the University of Cambridge in 2010, where she was a Gates Cambridge Scholar. At Cambridge, she wrote her dissertation on a nineteenth-century Roman villa, and her studies focused on eighteenth- and nineteenth-century Italian and British architecture and landscape architecture; she maintains an active interest in this field. Rachel earned her B.A. from Yale University in 2009, where she double-majored in the history of art and Italian. She has held internships at the Metropolitan Museum of Art (Robert Lehman Collection), the Yale University Art Gallery and the Frick Collection, and most recently worked at a boutique litigation firm in New York City.

Lorenzo Buonanno

Lorenzo Buonanno

Italian Renaissance Art; Painting and Sculpture of Venice; Interaction between Painters and Sculptors; Roman Art

Lorenzo is a sixth-year graduate student currently working on his dissertation "Sculpted Altarpieces, Devotion, and Artistic Interaction in Early Renaissance Venice." He received M.A. degrees from Middlebury College and from Columbia University. He has presented papers at the annual meetings of the Renaissance Society of America (2010, 2012), the International Congress on Medieval Studies in Kalamazoo (2007), and the Incontri in onore di Michelangelo Muraro in Sossano, Italy (2009). Lorenzo has served as Assistant to the Director of the Columbia University Program in Venice (2009-2010), and as Co-student Coordinator of the New York Renaissance Consortium (2009-2012).

Raymond Carlson

Raymond Carlson

Raymond specializes in Italian Renaissance and Baroque art. He received his B.A. (Magna Cum Laude, Phi Beta Kappa) from Yale University in 2011 with a double major in Art History and Italian. As a recipient of the Paul Mellon Fellowship, Raymond completed two consecutive M.Phil.s at the University of Cambridge in Italian and Art History. His first M.Phil. dissertation examined the promotion of Michelangelo's poetry within the Accademia Fiorentina. His second M.Phil dissertation considered the role of art in academic banquets in 17th-century Italy. Raymond has had professional experiences at the Frick Collection, the Fitzwilliam Museum, the Yale University Art Gallery, and the Rome bureau of the Associated Press.

Colby Chamberlain

Modern and Contemporary Art

Colby Chamberlain is a Jacob K. Javits Fellow, a senior editor for the online magazine Triple Canopy, and a contributor to Artforum and Cabinet. A recent alumnus of the Whitney Independent Study Program, he is at work on his dissertation, "George Maciunas and the Art of Paperwork."

Anne Hunnell Chen

Anne Hunnell Chen

Late Antiquity, Roman Provincial Art and Archaeology, Byzantine Art and Architecture, Sasanian Art and Architecture, Intercultural Exchange

Anne Hunnell Chen studies the art and architecture of the Roman Empire, with a particular focus on Late Antiquity. Her dissertation, The Politics of Family: Familial References in Tetrarchic Architecture and Iconography explores the late 3rd century Tetrarchic emperors' strategic use of references to fictive and earthly family in official ideology. She has excavated at the Roman Baths in Iesso (Spain) and at the palace of emperor Galerius at Felix Romuliana (Serbia). Her B.A. degree was earned from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in the fields of Art History and Classical Studies.

Joshua Cohen

Joshua Cohen

African art; African/European exchanges in 20th-century art; global modernisms; African staged performance; "primitivism"; colonial history and postcolonial studies

Joshua Cohen studied English at Vassar College before conducting Fulbright research in Guinea, West Africa, in 2003-04. At Columbia since 2007, his doctoral dissertation, entitled "Masks and the Modern: African/European Encounters in 20th-Century Art," has received support from the Lurcy, Kittredge, Dedalus, Mellon, and Whiting foundations, among others. The dissertation tracks early- to mid-20th-century modernist appropriations of African sculpture by European and African artists between France, South Africa, and Senegal. A second project, tentatively entitled "Displacements: African Arts on the Global Stage, 1921-1980," builds on research conducted in Guinea and elsewhere since 2002, examining international staged productions of African dance, music, theater, and masquerade. An initial essay on Fodéba Keita and Les Ballets Africains was published in 2012.

Sandrine Colard

Sandrine Colard

African, African diasporic, European modern and contemporary art, photography

Sandrine Colard is a 3rd-year PhD student. She studies African, African diasporic and European modern and contemporary art, with a particular focus on photography.

She received a First Prize Diploma of Violin from the Royal Conservatory of Belgium (2000), a B.A. in English and Spanish Literatures from the Free University of Brussels (2005), and an M.A. in Africana Studies from NYU (2007). Her interests are visual culture, film, colonialism and post-colonialism in the arts.

Sonia Coman

Sonia Coman

18th century early modern art in France; printmaking and interpretative prints; the history of collecting

Sonia Coman is a first-year Ph.D. candidate studying 18th century French art. Sonia graduated from Harvard College in May 2011, having written an honors senior thesis on authorial ambition and the original-copy paradigm in the compendium of prints known as the Recueil Jullienne. Sonia worked as a student docent for the Harvard Art Museum and as a curatorial intern in the Department of Paintings at the Louvre Museum in Paris. Sonia's areas of interest include collecting practices in France in the 18th and 19th centuries, particularly related to prints, and representations of theater in early modern drawings and paintings.

Jessamyn Abigail Schafer Conrad

Jessamyn received her BA in Art History and Social Anthropology from Harvard, and her MPhil in Historical Studies from Cambridge University. Her undergraduate thesis analyzed the spatial systems of the three Muslim Harams and her Cambridge thesis was the first comprehensive study of the collection of Islamic art currently held in the Bargello Museum in Florence. Her dissertation focuses on five trecento altarpieces made for the Cathedral in Siena, and more specifically on issues of depicted narration, space, and time. She currently teaches literature in Columbia's Core Curriculum, consults at the writing center, and is working on her second trade non-fiction book.

Emily Margaret Cook

Emily Margaret Cook

Republican and early imperial Roman art and archaeology; Etruscan and Italic art and archaeology; ancient painting

Emily is a second year student in the PhD program studying ancient art with a focus in Italian and Roman art and archaeology. She is a Jacob K. Javits fellow and has received the Waldbaum scholarship from the AIA for participation in an archaeological field school, which enabled her to participate in Columbia's field project at the Villa San Marco (Italy). Emily earned a B.A. in Classics and the History of Art at Johns Hopkins University in 2009 where her undergraduate senior honors thesis focused on the context and decoration of the domestic baths in Pompeii. She has worked as a volunteer and Curatorial Assistant at the Johns Hopkins University Archaeological Collection. In the Spring of 2009 Emily received the Robert and Nancy Hall Fellowship and worked in the Renaissance and Baroque Art curatorial department of the Walters Art Museum.

Lindsay Cook

Lindsay Cook

Romanesque and Gothic Architecture and Urbanism; Restoration of Medieval European Buildings

Lindsay earned a B.A. in 2010 from Vassar College, where she majored in Art History and French. Benefitting from two consecutive summers in the field as a QuickTime VR photographer for Mapping Gothic France, she hopes to focus on French Gothic architecture and urbanism, as well as theories and technical aspects of architectural restoration.

Lindsay also has a background studying modern architecture, which informs her understanding of the transformative power of architectural space. She wrote her undergraduate thesis about plans for a new chapel at Vassar in the 1950s, including one proposal by Philip Johnson, and she worked for two summers at Frank Lloyd Wright's Robie House. Before entering the PhD program at Columbia, Lindsay worked on a public sculpture database for the Chicago Park District and interned at the Alliance Française de Chicago, where she helped with the 2011 French Decorative Arts Symposium.

Vivian Crockett

Vivian Crockett

Vivian Crockett joined Columbia as a PhD student in 2012, having completed her B.A. in Art History at Stanford University in 2006. While studying abroad as an undergraduate, she interned at the Musée d'Orsay. She has worked in the Education, Conservation, and Registration departments at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, and held a three-year position as a research assistant in the museum's Painting and Sculpture department. Vivian is interested in the application of critical race theory, postcolonial theory, queer theory and gender theory to the study of postwar and contemporary art.

Nicholas Croggon

Nicholas Croggon

Nicholas Croggon is a graduate student completing his PhD in modern and contemporary art. He is the co-founder and co-editor of the Australian contemporary art journal Discipline, an editor of the online art history journal, emaj and has written and lectured on the topic of contemporary Australian art. Nicholas graduated with first class honours in art history and law from the University of Melbourne, and previously worked as a public interest environmental lawyer.

Carrie Cushman

Carrie Cushman

Japanese Modern Art and Architecture

Carrie Cushman is a first year PhD student in the History of Art and Archaeology Department interested in issues of originality and tradition in post-war Japanese architectural discourse and practice. Her undergraduate honors thesis focused on the exhibition house and garden, Shōfusō (originally exhibited at the Museum of Modern Art, New York in 1954), as a means of examining the role of the traditional Japanese vernacular within Modern architectural practice and discourse in the West.

Sophia D'Addio

Sophia D'Addio

Italian Renaissance Art and Architecture; Interactions between Art and Music; Nineteenth-Century Reception of the Renaissance

Sophia graduated from Colgate University with a BA in Creative Writing and Medieval & Renaissance Studies. Thereafter she earned an MA in Italian from Middlebury College, in conjunction with the Universitá degli Studi di Firenze; her thesis entitled "Il valore, la funzione, e la potenza dell'immagine: Iconografie domenicane e francescane negli affreschi del Trecento" compared two Trecento fresco cycles respectively located in the convents of Santa Maria Novella and Santa Croce in Florence. An avid musician, she then went on to complete an MA in Violin and Viola Performance at Queens College, where she also studied Renaissance mensural notation and early Baroque performance practice, culminating in a production of Monteverdi's L'Orfeo. She received a third MA in Art History from the University of Pennsylvania, with a thesis examining the political implications of Charles V's encounter with the Concistoro Frescoes of Domenico Beccafumi in the Palazzo Pubblico in Siena.

Catherine Damman

Catherine Damman

Modern and Contemporary Art

Catherine is a first year PhD student studying postwar American and European art. Her research explores the strategies of conceptualist practice in the 1960s and 1970s, with an emphasis on issues of spectatorship, performance, and display. Catherine holds a B.A. in Art History and Philosophy from Loyola Marymount University.

Michaela de Lacaze

Michaela de Lacaze

Latin American Modern and Contemporary art

Michaela de Lacaze, a second-year student, studies Latin American Modern and Contemporary art and is particularly interested in Brazilian and Argentinean art of the postwar period. She received her B.A. in History of Art and Architecture from Harvard University in 2007. She has worked at the New Museum of Contemporary Art, the Smithsonian American Art Museum, and the Institute of Contemporary Art in Boston.

Alessandra Di Croce

Alessandra Di Croce

Italian Renaissance Art

Alessandra Di Croce, a fourth-year student, specializes in Italian Renaissance Art; her research interests are focused on the relationship between visual arts and religious issues in late 16th/early 17th century Italy, within a context of important cultural transformations at the dawn of modern thought.

Her dissertation analyzes the impact that collections of Early Christian and Medieval art objects in post-Tridentine Rome had on the development of a new understanding and appreciation of earlier art, as well as on the paleo-Christian revival of the late 16th/early 17th century in Rome. Alessandra received her BA and MA (Scuola di Specializzazione) from the University of Rome "La Sapienza". From 2001 to 2005 she collaborated with the "Soprintendenza Speciale per il Polo Museale Romano", participating in several cataloguing projects and in the organization of the exhibition Il Settecento a Roma (Rome, Palazzo di Venezia, November 2005–February 2006). Alessandra has also published with Italian journals (Bollettino d'Arte, Ricerche di Storia dell'Arte, Neoclassico), and written catalogue entries for several exhibition catalogues (Il Gran Teatro del Mondo. L'Anima e il Volto del Settecento, Milan 2003; Il Settecento a Roma, Rome 2005–2006; GOYA e la tradizione italiana, Parma 2006; San Nicola da Tolentino nell'arte. Corpus iconografico, Tolentino 2006, vol. II).

Xiaohan Du

Xiaohan Du

Chinese painting and calligraphy

Xiaohan studies the history of Chinese art and Japanese art, with a focus on the pre-modern period. She received her B.A. with Honors in Art History from Hamilton College in 2012, with a minor in History. She studied French and European art in Paris, where she also had an internship with Museé Guimet. Prior to coming to Columbia in the fall following her graduation, she interned with the Chinese works of art department at Christie's New York office, as well as the Japanese and Korean painting department at the Cleveland Museum of Art in Ohio.

Adam Eaker

Adam Eaker

Early Modern European art; the history of art history

Adam Eaker received his B.A. in art history from Yale in 2007. Before coming to Columbia, he worked at the Yale Center for British Art and for a dealer in Old Master drawings.

Yasmine Espert

Yasmine Espert

Yasmine Espert is a first-year PhD student with research interests in film and photography of the Caribbean and its Diaspora. As a 2011-2012 Fulbright scholar in Barbados, she completed research under the Cultural Studies M.A. program at the University of the West Indies, the Barbados Arts Council, and The Fresh Milk Art Platform, Inc. Yasmine continues to volunteer for Fresh Milk as an off-site liaison. She held several internships, including a position at the Studio Museum in Harlem where she completed primary research for the Caribbean: Crossroads of the World exhibition. Yasmine received her B.A. in Art History from Washington and Lee University in 2011.

Frank Feltens

Japanese Art

Frank Feltens studies Japanese art history under Professor Matthew P. McKelway. He received his B.A. in Japanese Studies from Humboldt University in Berlin and spent a year at Kyoto University as an undergraduate. His main research focuses are Momoyama and Edo period painting (particularly Rinpa) and its links with theater and classical literature. In this context he tries to draw connections between practices in the consumption and understanding of classical literature (e.g. through Noh theater, digests or renga manuals) and art in these periods. His other interests include medieval depictions of classical themes, premodern art criticism and intersections between different artistic media.

Daria Foner

Daria Rose Foner

Daria Rose Foner is a first-year doctoral student specializing in Italian Renaissance art and visual culture. She received her B.A. from Princeton University in 2011 and her M.Phil. under the direction of Deborah Howard from the University of Cambridge in 2012. In the UK, she focused her scholarship on depictions of Saint Catherine of Alexandria and received a Brancusi Award to travel to Italy to pursue research for her Master's dissertation. During her time in Cambridge, Daria volunteered at the Fitzwilliam Museum and presented papers at conferences at the University of Birmingham and the University of Edinburgh. She has held internships at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Uffizi Gallery, and the Marianne Boesky Gallery. Prior to attending university, Daria danced with the Norwegian National Ballet.

Michael Anthony Fowler

Michael Anthony Fowler

Greek and Near Eastern art and archaeology; human sacrifice; emotional dynamics of art; material religion; archaeology and iconography of ritual; violence in art

Michael is a fourth-year doctoral student currently conducting research for a dissertation on the subject of human sacrifice in Greek antiquity. In the course of his studies at Columbia, he earned the M.A. and M.Phil. degrees in Art History and Archaeology, submitting a qualifying paper entitled "Agonizing agalmata: dying figures in Greek sculpture". Michael also interned for two consecutive summers in the Collection of Vases and Minor Arts at the National Archaeological Museum, Athens. In addition to working on the dissertation, he is co-author of the Chronique archéologique de la religion grecque (ChronARG), Assistant Review Editor for the Association for Coroplastic Studies (ACoST), and Research Assistant to Profs. Ioannis Mylonopoulos (Columbia) and Angelos Chaniotis (Institute for Advanced Study). Michael was previously educated at Tufts University (M.A., Classical Archaeology, 2010), Harvard University (M.T.S., Religions of the World, 2008) and The Colorado College (B.A., Philosophy and Sociology, 2006).

Amanda Gannaway

Amanda Gannaway

Pre-Columbian Art and Architecture, visual strategies of empire, archaeology as cultural patrimony

Amanda Gannaway received a B.A. in Archaeology from Barnard College in 2006 and an M.A. in Art History from Columbia University in 2009, where she currently studies the art and architecture of the pre-Columbian Americas. Amanda has participated in archaeological projects in Belize, Ecuador, Bolivia and Scotland and has worked in museums in New York and Peru. Her current research focuses on the material culture of groups inhabiting the Peruvian north coast during the Late Intermediate Period.

Sofia Gans

Sofia Gans

Early Christian and Medieval Art and Architecture; Applications of Digital Technology in Teaching of Art History

Sofia Gans graduated from Vassar College in 2009 with a degree in art history and French. Her area of focus is early Christian and medieval art and architecture, specifically the relationships between objects and the built environment and the arts of pilgrimage. Additionally, Sofia spent two summers traveling to France with Columbia's Media Center for Art History, working on the Mellon-funded Mapping Gothic France research database. This project, along with a year and a half spent working in the Education department of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, also gave Sofia a strong interest in teaching art history in both a classroom and museum setting, specifically applications of new technology to further access and engagement with objects and sites.

William T. Gassaway

William T. Gassaway

Pre-Columbian Art and Architecture

William earned his B.A. in Art History from the University of New Mexico, where he wrote his undergraduate thesis on the commodification of Maya cultural patrimony. Now, as a doctoral candidate in pre-Columbian art history, William is largely engaged with indigenous representations of the body and the cosmos in ancient Mexico. He has deep interests in Latin American modernism, antiquarianism, phenomenology, and the visual culture of the American Southwest as well.

In his dissertation, titled "Extraordinary Bodies: Divine Deformation among the Aztecs (AD 1350-1521),” William offers the first expressly art historical discussion of the forms, contexts and meanings of aggrieved and misshapen bodies within the arts of Central Mexico.

Beth Gollnick

Beth Gollnick

Feminism, photography, film, installation art, expanded cinema

Beth Gollnick studies modern and contemporary art with a special interest in photography and film. Her work focuses on issues related to feminism, institutional critique, materiality/dematerialization, and spatial politics. Beth received her BA with honors in Art History and English from the University of California, Los Angeles, where her undergraduate thesis received an Award for Scholastic Excellence.

Alexandra Helprin

Alexandra Helprin

Russia between Peter I and 1917, Reception of Classical Antiquity, Neoclassicism and its Detractors

Alexandra Helprin specializes in the art of Russia between 1700 and 1917. Her dissertation is about the artistic projects of the Sheremetev family, Ivan and Nikolai Argunov, and, more broadly, the effects of serfdom on Russian visual art, patronage, and collecting during the late eighteenth century. She received an A.B. in classical archaeology from Harvard in 2007.

Nina Horisaki-Christens

Nina Horisaki-Christens

Nina Horisaki-Christens entered the PhD program in 2013, and her current research focuses on histories of Japanese performance and media art from the late 1960s through the 1970s. Prior to entering Columbia's PhD program, she was a 2012-13 Helena Rubinstein Curatorial Fellow in the Whitney Museum's Independent Study Program, for which she co-curated Maintenance Required at The Kitchen, and she also worked as Research Assistant for Gutai: Splendid Playground at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum. As Assistant Curator and Interim Program Manager at Art in General, she curated exhibitions, residencies, and commissions with New York-based and Eastern European emerging artists. Horisaki-Christens was a 2008-09 Lori Ledis Curatorial Fellow at BRIC Rotunda Gallery, and Summer 2013 Curator-in-Residence at Seoul Art Space Geumcheon (Korea). She has contributed to publications produced by The Whitney Museum of American Art, Independent Curators International, Art21.com, Flux Factory, and Art in General. She holds a B.F.A. in Sculpture and Japanese Language and Literature from Washington University in St. Louis.

Subhashini Kaligotla

Subhashini Kaligotla

Subhashini Kaligotla is a doctoral candidate in South Asian art with a research focus on the sixth to eighth century temple architecture of India's Deccan region. Other research interests include Indo-Islamic architecture, the contemporary art of South Asia, Orientalism, and postcolonial theory. She has taught the history of Indian art and architecture at Barnard College, Columbia University, and New York University. Subhashini also holds advanced degrees in electrical engineering and creative writing (poetry), and is the recipient of a Fulbright fellowship for literary translation. Her poetry has been published in literary journals and anthologies in the United States, the United Kingdom, and India.

SeungJung Kim

SeungJung Kim

Classical Art and Archaeology; Archaic and Classical Greek Art; Archaeology of Sicily; Ancient Philosophies of Art; Cross-Cultural Currents in Art; Gandharan Buddhist Art

Trained originally as an Astrophysicist, SeungJung came under the spell of Classical Archaeology at University of Virginia, where she eventually obtained her MA in Art History. With a penchant for Sicilian archaeology, she also spent one year working at the Metropolitan Museum, before coming to Columbia University for her doctorate. She is currently working on her dissertation titled, "Concepts of Time and Temporality in the Visual Tradition of Late Archaic and Classical Greece," where she tries to explore how changing notions of time in the visual arts can be contextualized to the larger cultural history of Time. She also keeps a keen interest in her minor field of Gandharan Buddhist Art, as an expression of one of the most powerful cross-cultural currents that bridges the Classical West and the Asian world.

Clare Kobasa

Clare Kobasa

Italian Renaissance and Baroque; British Art; Printmaking/Print Culture

Clare graduated with a BA in 2010 from Swarthmore College with a double major in history and art history. She has interned in the print departments at the Yale University Art Gallery, the Art Institute of Chicago, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, and the Philadelphia Museum of Art. As a fellow at the Slought Foundation in 2010-2011 she was the research assistant for "Architecture on Display." Other research interests include the Gallery of Maps in the Vatican, the relationship between English and Chinese gardening and landscaping practices in the eighteenth century, Roman mosaics in Sicily, and southern Italian Renaissance art.

Sandrine Larrivé-Bass

East Asian Art History and Archaeology; Early China; Cross-Materiality; Materiality

Emily Leibert

Emily Liebert

Modern and Contemporary Art, Feminist Theory, Performance

Emily Liebert will complete a Ph.D. in Columbia's Department of Art History and Archaeology in October 2013. Her dissertation, "Roles Recast: Eleanor Antin and the 1970s," is the first monographic study of this artist; it received support from the Henry Luce Foundation/American Council of Learned Societies and the Smithsonian Institution. Emily has also curated a related exhibition, Multiple Occupancy: Eleanor Antin's "Selves," which will be on view at Columbia's Wallach Art Gallery from September 4 through December 7, 2013 and the ICA Boston from March 19 through July 6, 2014. The exhibition is accompanied by an illustrated catalogue that Emily edited and to which she contributed the introductory essay. From 2008-2011 Emily was a Joan Tisch Teaching Fellow at the Whitney Museum; during that time, she participated in the Whitney Independent Study Program. Emily has taught modern and contemporary art through Columbia's Department of Art History and its School of the Arts. She holds a B.A. in art history from Yale. Between college and graduate school Emily worked at the Chinati Foundation in Marfa, Texas.

Natasha Marie Llorens

Natasha Marie Llorens

Modern and Contemporary Art

Natasha Marie Llorens is a PhD student in modern and contemporary art history and an independent curator. Recent curatorial projects include "Troubling Space," at the Zabludowicz Collection, in London and "A study of interruptions" at Ramapo College, in New Jersey. Her academic research is focused on post-minimalist art, human rights discourse, and feminism. She holds a BA in Art History from Simon's Rock College, and an MA in Contemporary Curating from the Center for Curatorial Studies at Bard College.

Risham Majeed

Risham Majeed

Romanesque Sculpture and Historiography; African sculpture; history and theory of collecting and display; studio photography

I was educated at the University of Chicago (B.A., 2002) and at the Courtauld Institute of Art (M.A. Gothic Architecture, 2004). Having specialized in Romanesque sculpture, my dissertation seeks to expand the reception of Romanesque art in France to include its parallel treatment with non-Western art, especially African sculpture, during the early colonial period.

I have received grants from the Georges Lurcy Foundation and the Samuel H. Kress Foundation for archival work conducted in Paris, Strasbourg, and Autun.

Jessica Maratsos

Jessica Maratsos

Italian Renaissance Art

Jessica is a PhD candidate in her fifth year at Columbia. Her dissertation focuses on the intersection between religious reform and pictorial innovation in Florence during the first half of the sixteenth century. She received her BA from Amherst College in 2004 and an MPhil from Cambridge University in 2006.

Francesca Marzullo

Francesca Marzullo

Italian Renaissance Art

Francesca Marzullo studies the art and architecture of the Italian Renaissance with a secondary interest in eighteenth- and nineteenth-century American painting. She holds a B.A. from Williams College, an M.Phil. from the University of Cambridge, and an M.A. from the University of Pennsylvania.

Nomaduma Masilela

Nomaduma Rose Masilela

Modern and Contemporary African Art; Art Theory; Postcolonial Theory; Comparative Art Histories

Nomaduma Masilela is a second-year PhD candidate who studies modern and contemporary art from Africa and the Diaspora. She is a Ford Pre-Doctoral Fellow and a Mellon Mays Undergraduate Fellow.

Nomaduma received her BA from Barnard College (2007). She was a Curatorial Fellow at The Kitchen, New York (2007-08) and conducted independent research in Dakar, Senegal as a Mortimer Hays Brandeis Traveling Fellow (2008-09) before arriving at Columbia University.

Megan McCarthy

Megan McCarthy

European and American Modern Art, Museum Studies, Art and National Identity, Theory of Ornament

Megan is currently a Jane and Morgan Whitney Fellow in Modern and Contemporary Art at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. There she is at work on her dissertation, The Empire on Display: Exhibitions of Germanic Art & Design in America, 1890-1914, which investigates how a series of German exhibits in US museums functioned as newfound modes of public and cultural diplomacy. Ultimately, the study suggests that art and exhibition practice played a central role in shaping the conditions that defined German-American relations upon the onset of World War I.

The recipient of grants and fellowships from DAAD, the German Historical Institute and the Council for European Studies, Megan earned her MA from the Courtauld Institute of Art and BA in Art History from Columbia. She has held positions at the Museum of Modern Art, the Whitney Museum of American Art, and the Peggy Guggenheim Collection. This year, Megan will present her research at the German Studies Association Annual Conference and the Association for Historians of American Art Symposium.

Arathi Menon

Arathi Menon

Arathi is a third-year PhD student of South Asian art history with a concentration in the Hindu temple and medieval architecture. In the course of her studies toward the B.A. in Communication at the University of California, San Diego, she became interested in studying the role that living artists play in the mediation of visual culture. This research resulted in the essay "The Value of Choice: Assigning Values to Commodities of Art", for which Arathi earned the Afsahi award (2006). She further pursued her interest in the artist while serving as a researcher for exhibits that include TRANSActions: Contemporary Latin American and Latino Art (2006), Jasper Johns: Light Bulb (2008), Robert Irwin: Primaries and Secondaries (2008) and childsplay (2008) which focused on the artist Allan Kaprow's installation and performance work ("happenings"). At Columbia, Arathi's recent M.A. thesis (2013) established a firm provenance within ancient India for an ivory statuette excavated in the city of Pompeii. Arathi is a Weatherhead East Asian Institute-SLYFF Fellow (2012) and recipient of the Steven Kossak Graduate Fellowship (2013).

Maggie Mustard

East Asian Art; Modern and Contemporary Japanese Visual Culture; Critical Theory; Representations of World War II and the Atomic Bomb; Memory and Trauma

Maggie received her B.A. in Art History and East Asian Studies from Brown University in 2007, where her thesis on Japanese atomic bomb survivor paintings received the George Downing Prize in Art History. In 2010, she graduated from the New School for Social Research with a master's degree in Liberal Studies and critical theory; her master's thesis investigated the visual representations of the atomic bomb in Japanese newspaper publications under the American postwar occupation of Japan. At Columbia, she hopes to continue her research around the intersection of visual culture and memory in Japan, particularly focused on the postwar period and representations of the atomic bomb over time.

Yemi Onafuwa

Yemi Onafuwa

Yemi Onafuwa studied Art History at Kalamazoo College and at the School of Oriental and African Studies (London). He received an MPhil from Columbia, and is currently writing a dissertation entitled "Bruegel's Vernacular Bodies." Yemi has published papers on 16th-century visual culture and on contemporary African art, and has given numerous talks. He is also the author of a novella and a novel, the latter to published by Random House.

Stephanie ORourke

Stephanie O'Rourke

European Art in the Long Nineteenth Century; Spectatorship and its histories; Sociology of Knowledge; History of the Projected Image

Stephanie O'Rourke studies European visual culture from the late eighteenth century to the early twentieth century. She is currently working on her dissertation, "Bodies of Knowledge: Fuseli, Girodet, and Spectatorship at the Turn of the Nineteenth Century," which examines artistic production in dialogue with an expanded set of popular and scientific spectacles and discourses. Stephanie has received fellowships from the Social Science Research Council, the Yale Center for British Art, and Columbia University. Stephanie holds a B.A. from Harvard University in Art History and English Literature.

Giulia Paoletti

Giulia Paoletti

African Art, History of Photography, Modern and Contemporary Art

Giulia Paoletti studied Art History at Sussex University (B.A. 2004) and the School of Oriental and African Studies (M.A. 2006) with a specialization in African art. She is currently writing her dissertation on the history of photography in Senegal. She has conducted research in Senegal, Nigeria, Mali and Cameroon, where she has examined contemporary photographic practices, and collaborated with institutions such as doual'art, iStrike Foundation and lettera27 Foundation. She was recently appointed a Columbia University Mellon Traveling Fellow (2011-12) and Reid Hall Fellow (2011) to conduct research in Senegal and Europe.

Matt Peebles

Matt Peebles

Ancient Greek Art and Archaeology

Matt is a PhD candidate in ancient art history and archaeology. He received his bachelor's degree from Cornell University and spent several years as a teacher in NYC before beginning the PhD program at Columbia. Matt specializes in ancient Greek art, and is currently investigating the construction of social identity through the image of the body in the archaic and classical periods. Since joining the department, he received his M.A. (2013) and his M.Phil (2014), and has worked in the sculpture department of the National Archaeological Museum in Athens. This summer, he will participate in the new archaeological field project in Onchestos, Greece, and next fall he will serve as a guest instructor in ancient Greek art at the University of Tübingen in Germany.

Elizabeth Perkins

Italian Renaissance painting & sculpture; fifteenth-century portraiture; painting technique and conservation

Elizabeth completed her B.A. at Middlebury College, where she received the Christian A. Johnson Award for her honors thesis "Singleness of Purpose: The Early Photography of Ruth Orkin." Her pursuit of art history and Italian language took her to Florence, Italy, where she studied the early Italian masters and took courses in painting conservation. Before embarking upon her Ph.D., Elizabeth spent several years working in Italy at international colleges, and held an internship at the Peggy Guggenheim Collection in Venice. While maintaining an active interest in modern and contemporary art, Elizabeth's research now centers on Italian Renaissance art and the development of painting techniques in Italy and the Netherlands. She is currently completing her dissertation, entitled "Antonello da Messina and the Independent Portrait in Fifteenth-Century Venice," which will be the first full-length study devoted to the portraiture of this important painter. It discusses the innovative technical aspects of the portraits, and situates Antonello's secular work in the context of budding humanistic concerns with self-representation, identification and the generative power of the artist during the mid-to-late fifteenth century.
www.columbia.edu/~eap2109

Turkan Pilavci

Turkan Pilavci

Art and archaeology of the ancient Near East

Turkan is a PhD student, specializing in the art and archaeology of the ancient Near East. She received her B.A. in Political Science and History from Bogazici University, Istanbul in 2006. She completed her M.A. in the Archeology of the Eastern Mediterranean in K.U. Leuven in 2007. Having participated in numerous field projects, since 2007 she has been a part of the Tarsus Gozlukule Archaeology Project, Turkey.

Leah Pires

Leah Pires

Modern & Contemporary Art

Leah Pires is a third-year PhD student whose work addresses modern and contemporary art across diverse mediums and geographical contexts. Her recent writing has focused on institutional critique, conceptual art, and experimental film. She is particularly interested in questions of authorship, instrumentality, experimentation, and critique as they relate to to the historical avant-gardes and artistic practices after WWII. In 2013, Leah curated the exhibition "Conspicuous Unusable" at Miguel Abreu Gallery. Before coming to Columbia, she completed an undergraduate degree in Art History and English at McGill University.

Neeraja Poddar

Neeraja Poddar

South Asian Art History, Indian Painting

PhD, Sixth Year

Eszter Polonyi

Eszter Polonyi

Central-Eastern European art, film and cultural theory from 1890s to 1930s, historiography, theories of the avant- and rear-garde, ideas of formalism, radical politics and an aesthetic of resistance

Eszter is interested in the historical emergence of cinema in realms of aesthetic, technical and scientific discourse. With training in Central-European and nineteenth-century aesthetics, her interests include the culture of experiment among the interwar avant-garde, issues of scale, the visual culture of revolution, theories of automatism, evolution and animal-machines, and critical theory. Her dissertation is called "Close-Up: Bela Balazs and an Aesthetic of Distance in Early Cinema Aesthetics," the first chapter of which was published in Apertura in 2012. She is currently in Europe on a travel fellowship.

Aaron M. Rio

Aaron M. Rio

Muromachi Period (1336–1573) Painting; Zen Buddhist Art; Medieval Japanese Sinology; Ink Painting in the Kanto Region

Aaron is a doctoral candidate in premodern Japanese art and is currently preparing a dissertation that examines medieval Japanese images of renowned poets from Chinese antiquity, from their introduction and development within the Zen monastic context to their eventual canonization by professional painters in the late medieval period. He is particularly interested in painting as representation of and medium for sacred encounters, both real and imagined. Aaron graduated with highest distinction from Indiana University where he received a B.A., with honors, in English and East Asian Languages and Cultures (2004). Before entering the Ph.D. program at Columbia in 2006, he worked for two years in Nara Prefecture, Japan. He received his M.A. (2008) and M.Phil. (2010) in art history from Columbia. He is currently supported by the Japan Foundation and is based at the Institute for Advanced Studies on Asia at the University of Tokyo.

Tina Rivers

Tina Rivers

Modernism; postwar American art and film; visual culture; media

Tina received her B.A. in art history from Harvard and also received an M.A. in visual studies from the University of California, Irvine before coming to Columbia. Her dissertation "Lights in Orbit: The Howard Wise Gallery and the Rise of Media in the 1960s" examines the emergence of a high-tech aesthetic in post-war American art; parts of this project have been accepted for presentation at the annual conferences of the College Art Association and Modernist Studies Association, as well as at numerous graduate student conferences. Her essay on filmmaker Peter Whitehead appeared in Framework: The Journal of Cinema and Media, and she has essays forthcoming in books from Düsseldorf University Press, Richter Fey Verlag, and Oxford University Press. Tina has also contributed her writing to Artforum.com and the children's book There Are NO Animals in This Book. Her work is collected on her website, www.tinarivers.com.

Michael Sanchez

Michael Sanchez is a PhD candidate in the department. He entered Columbia after receiving his BA in Literature from Harvard. His dissertation draws on original archival material to trace some of the key elements of the contemporary art dispositif back to the Rhineland circa 1970. This project articulates the interconnections between four apparently disparate phenomena that emerged at this moment: jet infrastructure and the circulation of artists (Konrad Fischer); discursively-oriented post-studio pedagogical techniques (Joseph Beuys); new market structures such as the art fair and econometric analysis of art distribution (Willi Bongard); and the independent contemporary art curator (Harald Szeemann).

Drew Sawyer

Drew Sawyer

History of Photography; 19th and 20th-Century American Art; Historiography

Drew is currently the 2012-2015 Beaumont and Nancy Newhall Curatorial Fellow at the Museum of Modern Art, New York. His dissertation explores the relationship between emerging professional photographic practices and photographic modernism in the work of Walker Evans. In 2011, he co-organized the exhibition 'Social Forces Visualized': Photography and Scientific Charity, 1900-1920, an in-depth examination of the pedagogical and publicity practices of Progressive Era charity and social work organizations. The exhibition and accompanying catalogue reconsidered photographs by Jacob Riis, Lewis Hine, and Jessie Tarbox Beals, among others. He has served as a curatorial research assistant at the The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum and received his B.A. in Economics and Art History from the University of Wisconsin, Madison.

Sarah C. Schaefer

Sarah C. Schaefer

19th-Century Visual Culture; History of Photography; Technologies of Reproduction; Religion and Media; Art and Politics

Sarah Schaefer is a PhD candidate focusing on nineteenth-century visual culture. She is currently working on her dissertation, "Reading from the Book of Gustave Doré: Religion, Media, Modernity." This project investigates how Doré's biblical art created new, transnational viewing practices situated between the secular and the sacred. She completed her BA in the History of Art at the University of Michigan in 2005, receiving Highest Honors for her undergraduate thesis on French political caricature in the aftermath of the Paris Commune. In 2009, she received an MA from Columbia University, with a thesis on the subject of the exhibition of Art Nouveau interiors. She has presented work in the United States, Canada, and Germany.

Joseph Scheier-Dolberg

Joseph Scheier-Dolberg

Chinese painting and calligraphy; Chinese decorative objects; modern and contemporary ink painting in China

Joseph Scheier-Dolberg studies the history of Chinese art, with a focus on painting. He received his BA from Swarthmore College in 2000 and his MA from Harvard University in 2005. In between, he spent time in Sichuan Province studying the history of Tibetan mural painting in a monastery on the border of the Tibet Autonomous Region. Prior to coming to Columbia in 2009, he spent several years working in the Chinese art department at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.

Joseph Scheier-Dolberg

David Schneller

Ancient Greek Art and Archaeology

David is a first year student in the PhD program. He focuses on the art, architecture and archaeology of the ancient Greek world with a primary interest in the Archaic through Hellenistic periods. David completed his Bachelor's degree in Classics and Fine Arts at New York University in 2011 and studied in Florence, Italy and Athens, Greece. He continued his work in Classics at the Post-Baccalaureate Program in Classical Studies at the University of Pennsylvania in 2012, where he also volunteered at the University Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology. He currently participates in the Excavations in the Athenian Agora, under the auspices of the American School of Classical Studies at Athens, where he is an assistant trench supervisor.

Abbe Schriber

Abbe Schriber

Modern and contemporary art; African-American art and art of the African diaspora; media and performance

Abbe Schriber entered Columbia's PhD program in Art History in fall 2013. She studies modern and contemporary art, focusing on questions of identity formation and subjectivity through gesture, embodiment and text. In particular, her research explores the intersections of African-American art and culture, Conceptual art, and language and vernacular, emphasizing sound, film, photography and performance. From 2010-2013 she was Curatorial Assistant at The Studio Museum in Harlem, where she curated the exhibitions Body Language (2013-14), Mendi+Keith Obadike: American Cypher (2013), and Harlem Postcards: Tenth Anniversary (2012-13). She received a BA in Art History from Oberlin College in 2009.

Siddhartha V. Shah

Siddhartha V. Shah

Siddhartha V. Shah received his BA in art history from The Johns Hopkins University (2000) and a Masters degree in East-West Psychology from the California Institute of Integral Studies (2003) with an emphasis on Hindu philosophy from a Jungian perspective. He has been an art dealer for 14 years, specializing exclusively in Hindu and Buddhist Nepalese art since 2005. In 2007, he began collaborating with Serindia Publications and Gallery in Bangkok on a series of exhibitions exploring the conflicts and intersections between religion and art in India. His articles have appeared in numerous publications on Asian Art including Marg, Orientations, and Art Asia Pacific Magazine. His academic interests include the function of religious imagery in contemporary Hindu practice, cults of the Divine Feminine, and cultural exchange between India and France through jewelry and objets d'art. Siddhartha is also a yoga instructor and assists with teacher trainings in New York City and Chicago. He is the recipient of the Steven Kossak Graduate Fellowship (2014).

Julia Siemon

Julia Siemon

Art of the Italian Renaissance, particularly sixteenth century Florentine painting; Early Netherlandish painting; Venetian art

I am a 5th year Ph.D. candidate. I received a BA in Art History and Spanish from Washington University in Saint Louis in 2006. My advisor is Professor David Rosand. My dissertation is tentatively entitled "Bronzino between the Republic and the Academy" and deals with certain portraits produced before the artist became court painter to Duke Cosimo I.

Rachel Silveri

Rachel Silveri

Modern and Contemporary Art

Rachel Silveri studies modern and contemporary art and has a broad interest in the thematic of the everyday across the historic and neo-avant-gardes. She received her B.A. in History of Art and Gender Studies from the University of Michigan in 2008 and was awarded an M.A. from Columbia in 2010.

Therese Sjøvoll

Therese Sjøvoll

The history of collecting and museums; seventeenth-century art and theory; and Odd Nerdrum, kitsch, and the figurative tradition

Therese Sjøvoll's dissertation is entitled "Queen Christina of Sweden's Musaeum: Collecting and Display in the Palazzo Riario" (dissertation sponsor, Prof. D. Freedberg). Her current research interests include the history of collecting and museums; seventeenth-century art and theory; and Odd Nerdrum, kitsch, and the figurative tradition. In Oslo, Therese assisted with the Odd Nerdrum retrospective exhibition at the Astrup Fearnley Museum of Modern Art. She also lectured at The Munch Museum and the Royal Palace of Norway. In London she interned at Sotheby's, and in New York she lectured at Scandinavia House and the Metropolitan Museum of Art. She currently teaches art history at the University of Oslo. Therese has received awards from the Berit Wallenberg Foundation, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, The Attingham Trust, The American Scandinavian Foundation, the Norway-America Association, and The Fulbright Commission. In her spare time, Therese is in the garden or at sea.

Jacob Stavis

Jacob Stavis

Ancient Near Eastern Art and Archaeology, Egyptian Art, Historiography

Jake is a first year student focusing on the art of the ancient near East and Egypt. He is especially interested in philosophies of representation and the relationship between art and writing, particularly how these two systems of communication interacted and informed one another during their earliest phases of development. Prior to entering the PhD program, Jake graduated magna cum laude from Columbia with a BA in art history and linguistics, writing an honors thesis on the relationship between image and text in early Mesopotamian kudurrus and glyptic. He has additionally worked as an archivist for the Pierpont Morgan Library seals and tablets department, and excavated with the University of Edinburgh Prastio Mesorotsos expedition in Cyprus. Aside from his antiquarian interests, he has written for a variety of popular media outlets including Paper Magazine and Esquire.

Zachary D. Stewart

Zachary D. Stewart

Medieval (and Neomedieval) Art and Architecture

Zachary Stewart holds a B.Arch in Architecture and Medieval Studies from the University of Notre Dame (2007) and an M.A. in the History of Art from the Courtauld Institute of Art (2008). While attending the latter institution on a Fulbright grant, he completed a prize-winning thesis on the thirteenth-century choir of the Temple Church in London, a building that sparked his continuing fascination with medieval architecture in England. His dissertation will examine the multiple temporalities of late medieval parish churches in East Anglia. Zachary has worked as a student research associate in the Research Forum at the Courtauld and as a field photographer and digital cataloger for the "Mapping Gothic France" project. He currently lectures at The Cloisters Museum in New York.

Hwanhee Suh

Hwanhee Suh

Chinese painting and calligraphy, Japanese pictorial art, Korean pre-modern art and aesthetics

Hwanhee is planning to explore, through the prism of rivalry, the lives and activities of seventeenth-century Chinese painters, most of whom competed for recognition from eminent patrons, art markets, and aesthetic publics. He is also deeply interested in history of Chinese album paintings with a keen focus on the possibilities and limitations of the painting format.

Hwanhee received his B.A. degree in Aesthetics (2007) and M.A. in Art History (2011) from Seoul National University with his MA thesis, "The Invention of a Masterpiece: The Life and Afterlife of Dong Qichang's (1555-1636) Wanluan Thatched Hall." In the paper Hwanhee has examined not only the painter's efforts to convey a specific message by coordinating verbal and visual languages but also the transformation of the painting's status into a masterpiece by later agents. Prior to joining Columbia in 2012, he participated in the preparation of the exhibition Silla: Korea's Golden Kingdom (2013-14) at the Metropolitan Museum of Art as a full-time intern funded by the Korea Foundation.

Chun-Yi Tsai

Chun-Yi (Joyce) Tsai

Arts of East Asia (especially paintings from Song-Yuan China and Muromachi-Edo Japan)

Chun-Yi 'Joyce' Tsai joined Columbia University in 2006. Before then, she completed her B.A. in English Literature at National Taiwan University and earned an M.A. in East Asian Studies at Harvard University. Her dissertation concerns the origins, transmission, and perception of images of the supernatural grotesque in Song-Yuan China. This project emerged from her interest in Chinese popular culture nurtured in her Harvard years, where she worked on topics related to the lay religion, vernacular literature, and folk arts of Late Imperial China. In between her degrees, she worked in broadcast journalism and in the education and curatorial divisions of The Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, The Freer & Sackler Galleries, and The Phillips Collection in Washington D.C.

Andrea Fabiola Vazquez

Andrea Fabiola Vazquez

Pre-Columbian Art, Architecture, and Archaeology

Andrea holds a BFA from Rhode Island School of Design (2001) and an MA in Art History from Columbia University (2009). Her interest in ancient American art history grew out of an extended period of travel throughout Central and South America. Drawing on her previous studies of visual communications, Andrea's research explores the relationship between semiotics and materiality in Andean visual culture.

Julia Vazquez

Julia Vazquez

Southern Renaissance and Baroque, Iberian Renaissance and Baroque

Julia studies Southern Renaissance and Baroque art with Professor Michael Cole. She received her B.A. in 2009 from Brown University, where she double-concentrated in the history of art and architecture and classics. She went on to internships in the Department of Paintings at the Musée du Louvre and in the Client Services/Business Development department of Sotheby's, Paris, before continuing her graduate studies at Columbia in the fall of 2010. Apart from those listed above, her interests include: the historiography of Spanish Baroque painting; Spanish and Spanish viceregal urban planning and design; ekphrasis; and the relationship between history, tradition, and material trace.

Lorenzo Vigotti

Lorenzo Vigotti

Italian Renaissance Architecture

Lorenzo received his M. Arch. summa cum laude from the University of Florence in Italy in 2008 with a thesis on Florentine architecture in the late-fourteenth century entitled "The Palace of Francesco di Marco Datini in Prato." As a trained architect he worked in Florence for a firm specializing in architectural restoration and continued his research on early Renaissance architecture both in Florence and Oxford. Lorenzo joined the doctoral program at Columbia University in 2009; his research interests include the structural behavior and preservation of medieval and Renaissance buildings as well as cultural exchange between Europe and the Islamic world during the Renaissance.

Brigid von Preussen

Brigid von Preussen

Nineteenth century European art; historiography; art criticism; history of collecting; revival styles

Brigid received her BA in Art History at Cambridge University in 2006, and her MA in Intellectual and Cultural History, 1300–1650, at the Warburg Institute in 2008. Her interests include the reception of Renaissance art and culture in nineteenth-century Europe.

Susan Wagner

Susan Wager

Eighteenth- and Nineteenth-Century French Visual Culture; Eighteenth-Century Consumption and Collecting; Early Twentieth-Century Avant-Garde Practices and Media Theory

Susan Wager specializes in eighteenth- and nineteenth-century French visual culture. Her dissertation focuses on eighteenth-century reproductions after François Boucher in the mediums of engraved gems, porcelain, and tapestry. She earned a B.A. in French & Romance Philology and Art History at Columbia in 2004 and spent three years as an assistant in the Art of Europe department of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. Her M.A. qualifying paper at Columbia was entitled "'Les Dadas Visitent Paris': Toward a New Definition of the Dada Diagram." Susan has received fellowships from the Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts, the Council for European Studies, and the American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies.

Alexis Renee Wang

Medieval Art

Alex Weintraub

Alex Weintraub

Alex focuses on the painting and broader visual culture of late 19th Century France. His interests include theories of the avant-garde, collaborations between writers and visual artists, and the history of exhibition and display. He graduated from Swarthmore College in 2011 with a special major in Visual Studies and Social Thought. At Swarthmore, he completed theses exploring the built environment of the King of Prussia Mall and the camp femininity of the bande dessinée heroine, Barbarella.

Robert Wiesenberger

Robert Wiesenberger

20th c. Architecture and Design; Art and Media of the Avant-Garde

Robert is a fourth year in the department, focused in particular on architecture and design in prewar Germany and the intersection of art, graphic design and early computing in postwar America. Along with David Reinfurt, he is organizing an exhibition on the graphic designer Muriel Cooper, scheduled to open in spring 2014, and to be accompanied by a publication supported by the Graham Foundation. He holds a B.A. with honors in History and Germanic Studies from The University of Chicago, and is the recipient of the Jacob K. Javits Fellowship from the U.S. Department of Education. He has worked at the design firms MetaDesign and Ammunition in San Francisco, and as a curatorial intern in the Department of Architecture and Design at MoMA. He is currently a critic at the Yale School of Art.

Serdar Yalcin

Serdar Yalcin

Art and archaeology of ancient Near East and Eastern Mediterranean during the Bronze and Iron Ages; Roman art and architecture

Serdar Yalcin is a PhD student of ancient art with particular interest in the art of ancient Near East in the Bronze Age. He received his BA in psychology, and MA in archaeology at Bogaziçi University in Istanbul, Turkey. His research interests include artistic interconnections in ancient eastern Mediterranean, Anatolian art and archaeology, Roman provincial art. Currently Serdar is working on his dissertation titled "Seals and patronage in the Late Bronze Age, ca. 1550–1150 BC". In this study, he investigates the issue of art patronage among non-royal groups in the Late Bronze Age Near Eastern societies through an analysis of the glyptic material.

Yu Yang

Yu Yang studies the history of Japanese art, with a focus on modern Japanese architecture. She received her B.A. in Film Studies from Peking University and her M.A in Art History from the University of Pittsburgh. She is currently supported by the Japan Foundation and is based at the Department of Architecture and Design at the Kyoto Institute of Technology. Her dissertation examines the dynamic interactions between the development of modernist architecture in Manchuria and Western Japan (in particular, the Hanshin-kan area) during the first half of the twentieth century.

Kori Lisa Yee Litt

Kori Lisa Yee Litt

Early Renaissance Italian Painting; Chinese Art

Kori Lisa Yee Litt specializes in Italian art, with an emphasis on Sienese and Florentine painting of the fourteenth and early fifteenth centuries. Her research interests include frescoes and illuminated manuscripts produced for and by the major mendicant orders, the global dissemination of early Renaissance art, and theories of sensory perception. In the field of Chinese art, Kori has focused on the topic of materiality in Song Dynasty painting, the history of Chinese calligraphy, and contemporary artist Xu Bing. This year she is teaching both Art Humanities and Asian Art Humanities. Kori received an M.A. in Art History from Williams College in 2007 and a B.A. in Art History and Psychological & Brain Sciences from Dartmouth College in 2005.

Gillian Young

Gillian Young

Modern and Contemporary Art; Performance Studies; Media History and Theory

Gillian Young holds a B.A. in Literature from Brown University and an M.A. in Media, Culture, and Communication from NYU. Before coming to Columbia, Gillian worked in the Department of Media and Performance Art at The Museum of Modern Art. She studies art and media histories of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, and is particularly interested in the legacy of score-based performances pioneered by artists and composers following World War II—as early engagements with information technology; reevaluations of authorship and control; and critiques of representation. Her recent writing on these topics has appeared in PAJ: A Journal of Performance and Art and e-misférica. She is currently a Critical Writing Fellow for Recess Activities in New York.

Taryn Marie Zarrillo

Taryn Marie Zarrillo

17th century Venetian art with a particular interest in issues of patrimony, the history of collecting, and forgeries

Her dissertation, Artistic Patrimony and Cultural Politics in Seicento Venice, expands on initial studies begun at the Courtauld Institute of Art where she studied with Professor Sheila McTighe and received an MA in 2002. Prior to entering the Ph.D program at Columbia University she worked in the curatorial departments of several institutions, including: the Mount Holyoke Museum of Art, The MIT Museum, the Courtauld Gallery (where she also served on the Advisory Committee), the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, and the Musée du Louvre. She has also served as an international art courier, exhibition organizer, is trained in conservation techniques and during summers has taught for Art History Abroad, a British based program. Taryn Marie received her BA in Renaissance and Baroque Studies from Mount Holyoke College and currently works with Professors David Rosand and Simon Schama at Columbia. When she is not studying art, she is an avid fencer, training in New York and Venice.