Scott A. Snyder


Columbia University
Associate Professor of Chemistry

Havemeyer Hall
Mail Code 3129
3000 Broadway
New York, NY 10027
sas2197@columbia.edu
212-854-3817
Fax: 212-932-1289

Professor Snyder's CV (pdf)

Teaching Philosophy (pdf)

Columbia Science Review Profile (pdf)

 

Professor Snyder grew up in the suburbs of Buffalo, NY, where his interests in science, particularly chemistry, were forged by a variety of experiences including three summers of research in a biochemistry lab at the State University of New York at Buffalo and an opportunity to attend the United States National Study Camp for the International Chemistry Olympiad.

Following his high school graduation, Scott elected to pursue undergraduate studies in chemistry at Williams College in Williamstown, MA, where he conducted research in several different areas, including physical organic, heterocyclic, and medicinal chemistry. He also spent a summer as an intern at the Dupont-Merck Pharmaceutical Company (now part of Bristol-Myers Squibb). These scientific endeavors resulted in several publications, a number of awards, and the receipt of national fellowships such as a Pfizer Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowship and the Barry M. Goldwater Fellowship in Science and Engineering.

In 1999, he began his graduate studies with Professor K. C. Nicolaou at The Scripps Research Institute, where he devoted his attention to studying the chemistry and biology of the marine-derived antitumor agent diazonamide A. During his five years in La Jolla, Scott was fully funded by graduate fellowships from the National Science Foundation, Pfizer, and Bristol-Myers Squibb. Overall, his thesis project resulted in two distinct total syntheses of this intricately complex molecule attended by the discovery of several new synthetic methods and strategies. In addition to his benchwork, Scott also co-authored five review articles, two book chapters, and a textbook, Classics in Total Synthesis II.

Scott then trained as a National Institutes of Health postdoctoral fellow in the laboratory of Professor E. J. Corey at Harvard University, where he completed the enantioselective total synthesis of four members of the dolabellane family of natural products and discovered several new synthetic reactions and reagents.

Since July of 2006, Scott has been pursuing his independent career at Columbia University where his group seeks to explore chemical space in the broadly defined area of natural product total synthesis.

Selected awards and honors include a Camille and Henry Dreyfus New Faculty Award, an Eli Lilly New Faculty Award, an Amgen New Faculty Award, an NSF CAREER Award, a Cottrell Scholar Award from the Research Corporation for Science Advancement, a Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS) Fellowship, an Eli Lilly Grantee Award, a Columbia University Presidential Teaching Award, a Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellowship and, most recently, a Bristol-Myers Squibb Unrestricted Grant in Synthetic Organic Chemistry, a DuPont Young Professor Award, and the 2012 Arthur C. Cope Scholar Award from the American Chemical Society. Research endeavors in the Snyder group are supported by generous grants from the National Institute of Health (through the National Institute of General Medical Sciences), the National Science Foundation, the American Chemical Society Petroleum Research Fund, and Columbia University.