Course Listings

The following is a list of current course offerings, subject to revision (please check the Directory of Classes for further changes). This list includes courses offered in the Classics Department (course numbers beginning with GREK for Ancient Greek, GRKM for Modern Greek, LATN for Latin, CLLT for Classical Literature, and CLPH for Classical Philology) as well as courses offered through other departments but taught by affiliated faculty (course numbers beginning with HIST for History, PHIL for Philosophy, and AHIS for Art History and Archaeology).

Fall 2015

Ancient Studies

The Major Seminar
GREK/LATN/ANCST V3996
Katharina Volk
F 2:10pm-4:00pm
3pts.
Prerequisites: Junior standing.
- Required for all majors in classics and classical studies. The topic changes from year to year but is always broad enough to accommodate students in the languages as well as those in the interdisciplinary major.

Directed Readings
ANCS V3997
3pts.

Directed Research
ANCS V3998
3pts.

 

Classical Civilization

Worlds of Alexander the Great
CLCV W3059 Section 001
John T Ma
MW 10:10am-11:25am
3pts

The Archaeology of Ancient Egypt and Nubia
CLCV V3101
Ellen Morris
T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
3pts
-Thanks to the pyramids of Giza, the treasure of Tutankhamun, and other remains of royal activity, pharaonic Egypt is justly famous for its monuments and material culture. Equally fascinating, if less well known, however, are the towns, fortresses, cultic centers, domestic spaces, and non-elite cemeteries that have been excavated over the past 200 years or so. The archaeology of Nubia is also little known but fascinating on many levels. This course will focus on what archaeology can reveal about life as it was experienced by individuals of all social classes. Through a combination of broad surveys and case studies of some of Egypt and Nubia’s most culturally indicative and intriguing sites, we will explore issues such as the origins of inequality, state formation and its effects, the uneasy mix of state-planned settlements and village life, urbanism, domestic and community worship, gendered spaces, ethnicity and colonialism, religious revolution and evolution, bureaucracy, private enterprise, and the effects of governmental collapse on life and death in ancient Egypt and Nubia.

Global Histories of the Book
CLCV W3244
Joseph Howley
M W 11:40am - 12:55pm
3pts

-This course introduces students to the material and cultural circumstances of the creation, transmission, circulation and consumption of written literature in cultures around the world from antiquity to the twenty-first century.  Students will consider the following questions: What is a book? What role does it play in connecting cultures' pasts with their futures, and cultures with each other?  Is it possible to tell a global history of the book?  How does the material form of a book relate to its status as a "classic"?

 

Classical Literature

Classical Myth
CLLT V3132
Helene P Foley
T Th 2:40pm-3:55pm 
3pts.
A survey of major myths from the ancient Near East to the advent of Christianity, with emphasis on the content and treatment of myth in classical authors: Aeschylus, Euripides, Hesiod, Homer, Livy, Ovid, Sophocles, Vergil.

 

Greek

Elementary I
GREK V1101 Section 001
Yujhan Claros
MWF 1:10pm-2:25pm 
4pts.
- For students who have never studied Greek. An intensive study of grammar with reading and writing of simple Attic prose.

Elementary I
GREK V1101 Section 002
Paraskevi Martzavou
T Th 6:10pm - 8pm
4pts.
- For students who have never studied Greek. An intensive study of grammar with reading and writing of simple Attic prose.

Elementary II
GREK V1102 Section 002
Collomia Charles
T Th 4:10pm-6:00pm
4pts.
Prerequisites: GREK V1101 or the equivalent, or the permission of the instructor or the director of undergraduate studies
Continuation of grammar study begun in GREK V1101; selections from Attic prose.

Intensive Elementary
GREK V1121 Setion 001
Jeremy A Simmons
M W F 11:40am - 12:55pm
4pts.
- Covers all of Greek grammar and syntax in one term. Prepares the student to enter second-year Greek

Intermediate Prose
GREK V1201 Section 001
Anna D Conser
M W F 1:10pm-2:25pm
4pts.
Prerequisites: GREK V1101-1102 or the equivalent.
Selections form Attic prose.

Intermediate II: Homer
GREK V1202 Section 001
Deborah Steiner
T Th F 11:40am - 12:55pm
4pts.

Prerequisites: GREK V1101-V1102 or the equivalent.
Detailed grammatical and literary study of several books of the Iliad and introduction to the techniques or oral poetry, to the Homeric hexameter, and to the historical background of Homer.

Selections from Greek Literature: Imperial Prose
GREK V3309 Section 001
Marcus Folch
M W 2:40pm-3:55pm
3pts.
Prerequisites: GREK V1201-V1202 or the equivalent

Post-Baccalaureate Seminar
GREK W3980 Section 001
Elizabeth Scharffenberger
F 2:10pm-4:00pm
3pts.
This seminar aims to provide students in the post-baccalaureate certificate program with opportunities 1) to (re-)familiarize themselves with a selection of major texts from classical antiquity, which will be read in English, 2) to become acquainted with scholarship on these texts and with scholarly writing in general, 3) to write analytically about these texts and the interpretations posed about them in contemporary scholarship, and 4) to read in the original language selected passages of one of the texts in small tutorial groups, which will meet every week for an additional hour with members of the faculty.

Major Seminar
GREK V3996 Section 001
Katharina Volk
F 2:10pm-4:00pm
3pts.
Prerequisites: Junior standing.
- Required for all majors in classics and classical studies. The topic changes from year to year but is always broad enough to accommodate students in the languages as well as those in the interdisciplinary major. Past topics include: love, dining, slavery, space, power.

Directed Readings
GREK V3997 Section 001
3pts.

Supervised Research
GREK V3998 Section 001
3pts.

Selections from Greek Literature: Sophocles
GREK W4009 Section 001
Helene P Foley
T Th 10:10am-11:25am
3pts.
Prerequisites: GREK V1201-V1202 or the equivalent

History of Greek Literature I
GREK W4105 Section 001
Elizabeth W Scharffenberger
T Th 2:10pm-4:00pm
4pts.
Prerequisites: At least two terms of Greek at the 3000 level or higher.
- Readings in Greek literature from Homer to the 4th century B.C.

Dionysius of Halicarnassus’ On Thucydides
GREK G88823
Elizabeth K Irwin
W 12:10pm - 2pm
3pts.

 

Latin

Elementary I
LATN V1101 Section001
Ashley A Simone
T Th F 10:10am-11:25am
4pts.

For students who have never studied Latin. An intensive study of grammar with reading of simple prose and poetry.

Elementary I
LATN V1101 Section 002
Barbara E Vinck
M W 6:10pm - 8pm
4pts.
For students who have never studied Latin. An intensive study of grammar with reading of simple prose and poetry.

Elementary I
LATN V1101 Section 003
Maria Combatti
M W 4:10pm - 6pm
4pts.
For students who have never studied Latin. An intensive study of grammar with reading of simple prose and poetry.

Elementary II
LATN V1102 Section 001
Giulia Bonasio
T Th 4:10pm - 6pm
4pts.
Prerequisites: LATN V1101
- A continuation of LATN V1101, including a review of grammar and syntax for students whose study of Latin has been interrupted.

Intensive Elementary
LATN V1121 Section 001
Isaia M Crosson
M W F 11:40am-12:55pm
4pts.
- Designed to cover all of Latin grammar and syntax in one semester in order to prepare the student to enter LATN V1201 or V1202.

Intermediate I
LATN V1201 Section 001
Collomia Charles
M W 6:10pm-8:00pm
4pts.
Prerequisites: LATN V1101-V1102, or LATN V1121, or the equivalent.
- Selections from Catullus and from Cicero or Caesar.

Intermediate I
LATN V1201 Section 02
M W F 10:10am-11:25am
4pts.
Prerequisites: LATN V1101-V1102, or LATN V1121, or the equivalent.
- Selections from Catullus and from Cicero or Caesar.

Intermediate Latin II
LATN V1202 Section 001
Evan L Jewell
T Th 6:10pm - 8pm
4pts.
Prerequisites: LATN V1201 or the equivalent.
- Selections from Ovid's Metamorphoses and from Sallust, Livy, Seneca, or Pliny.

Augustan Poetry
LATN V3012 Section 001
Katharina Volk
T R 11:40am-12:55pm
3pts.
Prerequisites: LATN V1202 or the equivalent.
- Selections from Vergil and Horace. Combines literary analysis with work in grammar and metrics.

Latin Literature Selections: Lucretius
LATN V3309 Section 001
James E Zetzel
M W 1:10pm-2:25pm 
3pts.

Prerequisites: LATN V1202 or the equivalent.
- Since the content of this course changes from year to year, it may be repeated for credit.

Post-Baccalaureate Seminar
LATN V3980
Elizabeth Scharffenberger
F 2:10pm - 4:00pm
3pts.
- This seminar aims to provide students in the post-baccalaureate certificate program with opportunities 1) to (re-)familiarize themselves with a selection of major texts from classical antiquity, which will be read in English, 2) to become acquainted with scholarship on these texts and with scholarly writing in general, 3) to write analytically about these texts and the interpretations posed about them in contemporary scholarship, and 4) to read in the original language selected passages of one of the texts in small tutorial groups, which will meet every week for an additional hour with members of the faculty.

Major Seminar
LATN V3997 Section 001
Katharina Volk
F 2:10pm-4:00pm
3pts.
Prerequisites: Junior standing.
- Required for all majors in Classics and Classical Studies. The topic changes from year to year but is always broad enough to accommodate students in the languages as well as those in the interdisciplinary major. Past topics include: love, dining, slavery, space, power.

Directed Readings
LATN V3997 Section 001
3pts.

Supervised Research
LATN V3998 Section 001
3pts.

Latin Literature: Livy on Empire
LATN W4009 Sectio 001
Joseph A Howley
M W 2:40pm-3:55pm
3pts.
Prerequisites: LATN V1202 or the equivalent.

Latin Literature of the Republic
LATN W4105 Section 001
James E Zetzel
M W 4:10pm - 6:00pm
4pts.
Prerequisites: At least two terms of Latin at the 3000 level or higher.
- Latin literature from the beginning to early Augustan times.

Elements of Latin Prose Style
LATN W4139 Section 001
Gareth Williams
T Th 11:40am-12:55pm
3pts.
Prerequisites: At least four semesters of Latin, or the equivalent. - Intensive review of Latin syntax with translation of English sentences and paragraphs into Latin.

 

Modern Greek

Elementary I
GRKM V1101
Maria Hadjipolycarpou
T Th 10:10am-12:00pm, F 10:10am - 11:00am (conversation hour)
4pts.
- This is the first semester of a year-long course designed for students wishing to learn Greek as it is written and spoken in Greece today. As well as learning the skills necessary to read texts of moderate difficulty and converse on a wide range of topics, students explore Modern Greece's cultural landscape from "parea" to poetry to politics. Special attention will be paid to Greek New York. How do "our", "American", "Greek-American" definitions of language and culture differ from "their", "Greek" ones?

Intermediate I
GRKM V1201
Maria Hadjipolycarpou
T Th 12:10pm-2:00pm
4pts.
Prerequisites: GRKM V1101-V1102 or the equivalent.
- This course is designed for students who are already familiar with the basic grammar and syntax of modern Greek language and can communicate at an elementary level. Using films, newspapers, and popular songs, students engage the finer points of Greek grammar and syntax and enrich their vocabulary. Emphasis is given to writing, whether in the form of film and book reviews or essays on particular topics taken from a selection of second year textbooks.

Directed Readings
GRKM V3997
1-4pts.

Senior Research Seminar
GRKM V3998
1-4pts.

Intermediate Modern Greek Conversation
GRKM W1211
Karen R Van Dyck
F 11:00am-11:50am
1pt.

Advanced Modern Greek
GRKM V3001
Maria Hadjipolycarpou
MW 4:10pm-5:25pm
4pts.
-This semester we will continue to build language skills but with particular attention to speaking and writing Greek at the university level. We will focus on such topics as diaspora, history, politics, and identity. We will use materials from literature, critical essays, historiography, film, and mass media as a way to advance knowledge in Modern Greek literature and culture. In addition we will explore the diversity of Greek language as it is spoken in different regions and gain understanding of its evolution through time. Materials include: essays (Seferis, Theotokas); newspaper articles; television interviews (Flessa and Papanikolaou); advertisement; stand-up-comedy (Lazopoulos); music (art-song, rebetika, hip-hop); theatre (Demetriades); literature (Roides, Papadiamantis, Kazantzakis, Lymberaki, Karapanou, Galanaki, Charalambides, Chatzopoulos, Chouliaras).

Topics Through Greek Film
GRKM G4135
Dimitrios Antoniou
M 6:10pm-8:00pm
4pts.
-This course explores the history and culture of modern Greece through film. It brings the Greek cinema canon (Angelopoulos, Ferris, Gavras, Cacoyiannis, Koundouros, et al.) into conversation with the work of contemporary artists, documentary filmmakers, and the recent “weird wave.” In doing so, the course addresses issues of memory and trauma, public history and testimony, colonialism and biopolitics, neoliberalism and governmentality, and crisis and kinship, and it asks: what kind of lens does film offer onto the study of a society’s history and contemporary predicament? The viewing and discussion of films is facilitated through a consideration of a wide range of materials, including novels, criticism, archival footage, and interviews with directors. The course does not assume any background knowledge and all films will have English subtitles. An additional 1-credit bilingual option (meeting once per week at a time TBD) is offered for students who wish to read, view, and discuss materials in Greek.

Worlding Cavafy: Desire & Media
GRKM W4300
Maria Hadjipolycarpou
Th 4:10pm - 6:00pm
4pts.
-By examining Cavafy's work in all its permutations (as criticism, translation, adaptation), this course introduces students to a wide range of critical approaches used in World Literature, Gender Studies, and Translation Studies.  The Cavafy case becomes an experimental ground for different kinds of comparative literature methods, those that engage social-historical issues such as sexuality, diaspora, postcoloniality as well as linguistic issues such as multilingualism, media and translation. How does this poet "at a slight angle to the universe" challenge contemporary theories of gender and literature as national institution? How can studying a canonical author open up our theories and practices of translation? Among the materials considered are translations by Edmund Keeley and Philip Sherrard, James Merrill, and Marguerite Yourcenar, commentary by E.M. Forster, C.M. Bowra, and Roman Jakobson, poems by W.H. Auden, Lawrence Durrell, and Joseph Brodsky, and visual art by David Hockney and Duane Michals. Though this course presupposes no knowledge of Greek, students wanting to read Cavafy in the original are encouraged to take the 1-credit directed reading tutorial offered simultaneously.

 

Affiliated Courses

Greek Art & Architecture
AHIS V3248 Section 001
Ioannis Mylonopoulos
M W 2:40pm-3:55pm
3pts.
- Introduction to the art and architecture of the Greek world during the archaic, classical, and Hellenistic periods (11th - 1st centuries B.C.E.).

Greek Art and Architecture Seen Through the Eyes of Pausanias
AHIS G4213 Section 001
Ioannis Mylonopoulos
T 4:10pm-6:00pm
3pts.
- There can be no doubt that Pausanias’ work, his ten books on Greece, is among the most important sources for the understanding of ancient Greek art and architecture. Modern scholarship has viewed Pausanias as an intellectual traveler, an antiquarian, an art historian or a historian of religion. His work has been called pedestrian, accurate but unimaginative, naïve, descriptive, and even the product of ekphrasis. However one would like to appreciate Pausanias, Classical archaeology and art history heavily must depend on him, since the vast majority of works of art and architecture that he describes/mentions are either entirely lost or badly preserved. The bridge seminar will attempt to bring together Pausanias’ text and the results of art historical and archaeological research in major Greek cities and sanctuaries. Despite Pausanias’ obvious interest in all things “ancient” and “Greek,” the seminar will attempt to understand the ancient traveller as a Greek from Asia Minor who wrote his work within the political, social, and intellectual frame of second-century Roman Empire. Ultimately, the seminar will seek to understand the art, architecture, and topography of Greek cities and sanctuaries through the eyes of a Roman.

Etruscan Art
AHIS G4213 Section 001
Francesco de Angelis
W 6:10pm-8:00pm
3pts.
-The Etruscans are primarily known to us through the artifacts they produced and used. Consequently, the study of their art provides a unique access key to their civilization. From the Villanovan period in the 9th c. BCE down to the end of the Hellenistic age in the 1st c. BCE, this seminar will examine all major historical developments of Etruscan art with a special focus on crucial issues such as the relationship between art and craftsmanship, issues of stylistic periodization, the special link to Greek art, the contexts and functions of Etruscan art, the social, political, and religious embeddednes of Etruscan artifacts, Etruscan notions of the body, divine anthropomorphism, gender issues, the modern historiography of Etruscan art and its intellectual backgrounds. Particular attention will be devoted to Otto Brendel, one of the great protagonists of the study of Etruscan art, who taught at Columbia from 1956 to 1973.
The aim of the seminar is twofold. In the first place, it is meant to provide a systematic overview of the history of Etruscan art and artisanship and make participants acquainted with the variety of genres and artifact typologies that characterize it—from terracotta architectural sculptures to wall paintings in tombs, and from votive figures to engraved mirrors. At the same time participants, by engaging in formal analyses of representative selections of Etruscan works and monuments, will learn how to retrieve historical information starting from a close observation of the object.

The Ancient Greeks 800-146 B.C.E.
HIST W1010 Section 001
Richard Billows
T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
3pts.
-A review of the history of the Greek world from the beginnings of Greek archaic culture around 800 B.C., through the classical and hellenistic periods to the definitive Roman conquest in 146 B.C., with concentration on political history, but attention also to social and cultural developments.Field(s): ANC

Roman Imperialism
HIST W3020 Section 001
William Harris
M W 4:10pm - 5:25pm
3pts.
- How did the Roman Empire grow so large and last so long? This course will examine the origins of the Romans' drive to expand, the theory of "defensive" imperialism, economic aspects, Roman techniques of control, questions about acculturation and resistance, and the reasons why the empire eventually collapsed. 

Golden Age of Athens
HIST W4024 Section 001
Richard Billows
Th 2:10pm - 4:00pm
4pts.

-The 5th century BCE, beginning with the Persian Wars, when the Athenians fought off the might of the Persian Empire, and ending with the conclusion of the Peloponnesian War in 404, is generally considered the "Golden Age" of ancient Athens. This is the century when Athenian drama, both tragedy and comedy, throve; when the Greeks began to develop philosophy at Athens, centered around the so-called "Sophistic movement" and Sokrates; when classical Greek art and architecture approached perfection in the monuments and sculptures of the great Athenian building programs on and around the Akropolis. This seminar will cover the political, military, economic, social, and cultural history of Athens' "Golden Age". Much of the course reading will be drawn from the ancient Athenian writing themselves, in translation. Everyone will be required to read enough to participate in weekly discussions; and all students will prepare two oral reports on topics to be determined. The course grade will be based on a ca. 20-25 page research paper to be written on an agreed upon topic.

The Ancient Jews and the Mediterranean
HIST W4610 Section 001
Seth Schwartz
Th 10:10am - 12:00pm
4pts.

-What can the history and ethnography of the Mediterranean world teach us about ancient Jews and early Christians and how can the experiences of the ancient Jews and early Christians be used to criticize and refine modern ideas about Mediterranean culture. We will examine selected ancient Jewish, Christian and Roman texts from a critical "mediterraneanist" perspective.

Roman History 14-337 AD
HIST G8045 Section 001
William Harris
W 10:10am-12:00pm
3pts.

The History of Philosophy: Pre-Socratics Through Augustine
PHIL V2101 Section 001
R 3:10pm-4:00pm
3pts.
Exposition and analysis of the positions of the major philosophers from the pre-Socratics through Augustine.

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Spring 2015

Ancient Studies

Directed Readings
ANCS V3997 Section 001
3pts.

Directed Research
ANCS V3998 Section 001
3pts.

 

Classical Civilization

Roman Religion
CLCV V3006 Section 001
Dan-El P Peralta
M W 4:10pm-5:25pm
3pts
-Students will study the history of religious activity in the Roman Republic and Empire (6th c. BCE-5th c. CE).

Plato and Confucius: Comparative Ancient Philosophies
CLCV V3535 Section 001
Marcus Folch
Th 6:10pm-8:00pm
3pts

Classics and Film
CLCV V3230 Section 001
Kristina Milnor
T Th 10:10am-11:25am
3pts

-Considers cinematic representations of the ancient Mediterranean world, from early silent films to movies from the present day. Explores films that purport to represent historical events (such as Gladiator) and cinematic versions of ancient texts (Pasolini'sMedea). Readings include ancient literature and modern criticism.

Identity and Society in Ancient Egypt
CLCV V3535
Section 001
Deborah Vischak
T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
3pts

Gender and Sexuality in Ancient Greece
CLCV W4110
Section 001
Helene Foley
T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
3pts

Prerequisites: Sophomore standing or permission of the instructor.
- Examination of the ways in which gender and sexuality are constructed in ancient Greek society and represented in literature and art, with attention to scientific theory, ritual practice, and philosophical speculation. Topics include conceptions of the body, erotic and homoerotic literature and practice, legal constraints, pornography, rape, and prostitution.

Roman Law
James Zetzel
M W  2:40-3:55pm
3pts

-Examines the history of the development of Roman law and legal thought. The role of law in Roman society. Introductions to Roman methods of legal analysis, with emphasis on study and class discussion of cases from the Roman jurists.

 

Classical Literature

 

Classical Philology

Approaches to Antiquity
CLPH G4300 Section 001
Marcus Folch
F 2:10pm-4pm
3pts.

Directed Readings
CLPH G4902 Section 001
3pts.

Directed Reading and Research
CLPH G8902 Section 001
3pts.

 

Greek

Elementary I
GREK V1101 Section 001
Collomia Charles
M W 4:10pm-6:00pm
4pts.
- For students who have never studied Greek. An intensive study of grammar with reading and writing of simple Attic prose.

Elementary II
GREK V1102 Section 001
Elia Ruben Rudoni
M W, F 1:10pm - 2:25pm
4pts.
Prerequisites: GREK V1101 or the equivalent, or the permission of the instructor or the director of undergraduate studies
Continuation of grammar study begun in GREK V1101; selections from Attic prose.

Elementary II
GREK V1102 Section 002
Simone A Oppen
T Th 6:10pm - 8pm
4pts.
Prerequisites: GREK V1101 or the equivalent, or the permission of the instructor or the director of undergraduate studies
Continuation of grammar study begun in GREK V1101; selections from Attic prose.

Intermediate Prose
GREK V1201 Section 001
Elizabeth W Scharffenberger
T, Th, F 11:40am - 12:55pm
4pts.
Prerequisites: GREK V1101-1102 or the equivalent.
Selections form Attic prose.

Intermediate II: Homer
GREK V1202 Section 001
Helene P Foley
T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
4pts.
Prerequisites: GREK V1101-V1102 or the equivalent.
Detailed grammatical and literary study of several books of the Iliad and introduction to the techniques or oral poetry, to the Homeric hexameter, and to the historical background of Homer.

Selections from Greek Literature II: Homer and Hesiod
GREK V3310 Section 001
Deborah Steiner
T Th 2:40pm-3:55pm
3pts.
Prerequisites: GREK V1201-V1202 or the equivalent

Directed Readings
GREK V3997 Section 001
3pts.

Supervised Research
GREK V3998 Section 001
3pts.

Selections from Greek Literature: Thucydides
GREK W4010 Section 001
Daniel J Tober
M W 6:10pm-7:25pm
3pts.
Prerequisites: GREK V1201-V1202 or the equivalent

History of Greek Literature II
GREK W4106 Section 001
Marco Fantuzzi
M W 11:00am - 12:55pm
4pts.
Prerequisites: At least two terms of Greek at the 3000 level or higher
Greek literature of the 4th century B.C. and of the Hellenistic and Imperial Ages.

Elements of Greek Prose Style
GREK W4139 Section 001
Elizabeth Scharffenberger
T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
3pts
Prerequisites: At least four terms of Greek, or the equivalent.
- An intensive review of Greek syntax with translation of English sentences and paragraphs into Attic Greek.

Happy Ending Loves: From Antilochus to Longus
GREK G8000 Section 001
Marco Fantuzzi
W 6:10pm-8pm
3pts.

 

Latin

Elementary I
LATN V1101 Section 001
Giulia Bonasio
T Th 6:10pm - 8pm
4pts.
-For students who have never studied Latin. An intensive study of grammar with reading of simple prose and poetry.

Elementary II
LATN V1102 Section 001
Collomia Charles
T, Th, F 10:10am-11:25am
4pts.
Prerequisites: LATN V1101
- A continuation of LATN V1101, including a review of grammar and syntax for students whose study of Latin has been interrupted.

Elementary II
LATN V1102 Section 002
Anna D Conser
M W 6:10pm - 8pm
4pts.
Prerequisites: LATN V1101
- A continuation of LATN V1101, including a review of grammar and syntax for students whose study of Latin has been interrupted.

Elementary II
LATN V1102 Section 003
Ashley E Simone
M W 4:10pm - 6pm
4pts.
Prerequisites: LATN V1101
- A continuation of LATN V1101, including a review of grammar and syntax for students whose study of Latin has been interrupted.

Intensive Elementary
LATN V1121 Section 001
Collomia Charles
T Th 4:10pm - 6pm
4pts.
- Designed to cover all of Latin grammar and syntax in one semester in order to prepare the student to enter LATN V1201 or V1202.

Intermediate Latin I
LATN V1201 Section 001
Carmela V Franklin
T, Th, F 11:40am - 12:55pm
4pts.
Prerequisites: LATN V1101-V1102, or LATN V1121, or the equivalent.
- Selections from Catullus and from Cicero or Caesar.

Intermediate Latin II
LATN V1202 Section 001
Gareth Williams
M W, F 11:40am - 12:55pm
4pts.

Prerequisites: LATN V1201 or the equivalent.
- Selections from Ovid's Metamorphoses and from Sallust, Livy, Seneca, or Pliny.

Intermediate Latin II
LATN V1202 Section 002
Ursula M Poole
M W 6:10pm - 8:00pm
4pts.
Prerequisites: LATN V1201 or the equivalent.
- Selections from Ovid's Metamorphoses and from Sallust, Livy, Seneca, or Pliny.

Selections from Latin Literature: Vergil
LATN V3310 Section 001
James Zetzel
M W 10:10am - 11:25am
3pts.
Prerequisites: LATN V3012 or the equivalent.

Directed Readings
LATN V3997 Section 001
3 pts.

Supervised Research
LATN V3998 Section 001
3pts.

Selections from Latin Literature: Cicero Life and LEtters
LATN W4010 Section 001
Katharina Volk
M W 11:40am - 12:55pm
3pts.
Prerequisites: LATN V3012 or the equivalent.

Latin Literature of the Empire
LATN W4106 Section 001
Katharina Volk
M W 4:10pm - 6:00pm
4pts.

Prerequisites: At least two terms of Latin at the 3000 level or higher.
- Latin literature from Augustus to 600 C.E.

Medieval Latin: Renaissance
LATN W4152 Section 001
Carmela Franklin
T Th 2:40pm - 3:55pm
3pts.

Martial
LATN G8400
Kristina Milnor
Th 2:10-4pm
3pts.

 

Modern Greek

Introduction to Modern Greek Language and Culture II
GRKM V1102 Section 001
Maria Hadjipolycarpou
T Th 9:00am - 10:50am
4pts.
Prerequisites: GRKM V1101 or the equivalent.
- This second semester course is designed for students who have taken the first semester course V 1101 or the equivalent. It focuses on Greek as it is written and spoken in Greece today.

Intermediate Modern Greek Language and Culture II
GRKM V1202 Section 001
Maria Hadjipolycarpou
T Th 11:00am - 12:50am
4pts.
- This second semester course is designed for students who have taken the first semester course V 1201 or the equivalent. Students are also required to take the conversation class GRKM W1212.

Intermediate Modern Greek Conversation
GRKM W1212 Section 001
Maria Hadjipolycarpou
F 11:00am-11:50am
4pts.
Prerequisites: GRKM V1101 or the equivalent.
- For students in GRKM V1202; but also open to students not enrolled in V1201 above, who wish to improve their spoken modern Greek.

The Making of Modern Greek Poetry 
GRKM V3306 Section 001
Maria Hadjipolycarpou
M W 4:10pm - 5:25pm
3pts.

The World Responds to the Greeks: Greece Faces East
CLGM V3920
Stathis Gourgouris
W 12:10pm-2:00pm
3pts
- This course is an antidote to Contemporary Civilization and Literature Humanities, considering the real, imagined, and forgotten ways that "Greece" was connected to the "East," from antiquity to the present, rather than the ways Greek culture and thought paved the way to "Western Civilization." The course fulfills the Global Core requirement.

Senior Research Seminar
GRKM V3998
Vangelis Calotychos
W 10:00am-12:00pm
4pts
- This course is primarily designed for students writing a senior thesis or undertaking advanced research on modern Greece or Greek Diaspora topics in all disciplines. Students not engaged in writing a senior thesis but interested in working on a research topic require the prior permission of the instructor: ec2268@columbia.edu

Directed Readings
GRKM V3997 Section 001
1-4pts.

Senior Research Seminar
GRKM V3998 Section 001
1-4pts

Diaspora Literature
GRKM V4920 Section 001
Karen R Van Dyck
T 6:10pm - 8:00pm
4pts.

Directed Readings
GRKM W4997 Section 001
3pts.

Affiliated Courses

Roman Art & Architecture
AHIS V3250 Section 001
Francesco de Angelis
M W 2:40-3:55pm
3pts
- The architecture, sculpture, and painting of ancient Rome from the 2nd century B.C. to the end of the Empire in the West.

Art, Archaeology and History of Anatolia
AHIS W4176 Section 001
A. Ozyar
T Th 2:40-3:55pm
3pts
- The architecture, sculpture, and painting of ancient Rome from the 2nd century B.C. to the end of the Empire in the West.

Early Dynastic Art and Archaeology
AHIS G8166 Section 001
Zainab Bahrani
M 4:10-6pm
3pts
- This seminar investigates the art and archaeology of the Sumerian city-states in Mesopotamia, focusing on sculpture, architecture, material culture, and the historical scholarship and scholarly debates regarding this era. Advanced knowledge of the ancient Near East is expected of seminar participants. The seminar readings will consist primarily of archaeological site reports and historical texts, as well as secondary literature on the third millennium BC accompanied by some readings in archaeological and critical theories. Students will be expected to research and compile the bibliographies for each of the Early Dynastic sites for their presentations and final papers.

Greek Myths in Etruria: Images, Cultural Memory, and Identity
AHIS G8262 Section 001
Francesco de Angelis
M 11-12:50pm
3pts
- The course will investigate the diffusion of Greek mythological images in Etruria, Southern Italy, and Rome from the Archaic to the Late Republican period (ca. 630 to 30 BCE). Among the issues which we will address there are: Why were peoples like the Etruscans or the Romans so keen on using Greek myth, and why did they not develop (to the same extent, at least) a mythic imagery of their own? What changes did myth undergo in the process of diffusion from Greece to the indigenous cultures in Italy? How can we use the verbal, narrative dimension of mythological scenes to get information about societies for which we do not have written sources?

Ancient History of Egypt
HIST W1020 Section 001
Marc Van de Mieroop
T Th 4:10pm-5:25pm
3pts

The Romans and the Empire
HIST W1020 Section 001
William V Harris
M W 4:10pm-5:25pm
3pts

Jews and Judaism in Antiquity
HIST W3611 Section 001
Seth Schwartz
M W 10:10am-11:25am
3pts

- This course focuses on the varieties of Judaism in antiquity, from Cyrus the Great to the Muslim Conquest of Syria, and the emergence of rabbinic Judaism. Special emphasis is placed on hellenization, sectarianism, and the changes precipitated by the destruction of the Jerusalem temple.

The Roman World in Late Antiquity
HIST W4010 Section 001
Giovanni R Ruffini
W 2:10pm-4:00pm
3pts
(Application required: see undergraduate seminar section of the department’s website)

Plato
PHIL V3121 Section 001
Wolfgang Mann
M W 10:10am-11:25am
3 pts

Aristotle
PHIL V3121 Section 001
Katja Vogt
T 2:10-4pm
3 pts

Rise of Civilization
ANTH V1008 Section 001
Terence D’Altroy
M W 10:10am-11:25am
3 pts

Intro to 21st Century Archaeology
ACLG V2028 Section 001
Zoe Crossland
T Th 11:40am-12:55pm
3 pts

Early Christianity
RELI V3140 Section 001
Elizabeth Castelli
M W 10:10am-11:25am
3 pts

Introduction to the Hebrew Bible
RELI V3501 Section 001
Beth Berkowitz
T Th 10:10am-11:25am
3 pts

Gender in Ancient Christianity
RELI V4120 Section 001
Elizabeth Castelli
M 2:10-4pm
3 pts

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  • Contact Info

  • Department of Classics
    1130 Amsterdam Avenue
    617 Hamilton Hall, MC 2861
    New York, NY 10027

  • Phone: (212) 854-3902
    Fax: (212) 854-7856
    Email: classics@columbia.edu