Course Archives

Fall 2014 Courses

CSER W3928 Sec 001
COLONIZATION/DECOLONIZATION
Brown, Christopher L.—T 9:00am - 10:50am – 420 Hamilton Hall
CSER W3928 is open only to CSER majors/concentrators. Others may be allowed to register with permission of the instructor.
This course explores the centrality of colonialism in the making of the modern world, emphasizing cross-cultural and social contact, exchange, and relations of power; dynamics of conquest and resistance; and discourses of civilization, empire, freedom, nationalism, and human rights, from 1500 to 2000. Topics include pre-modern empires; European exploration, contact, and conquest in the new world; Atlantic-world slavery and emancipation; European and Japanese colonialism in Asia, Africa, the Middle East. The course ends with a section on decolonization and post-colonialism in the period after World War II. Intensive reading and discussion of primary documents.

 

CSER W3924 Sec 001
LATIN AMERICAN & LATINO SOCIAL MOVEMENTS
Rockefeller, Stuart —T 11:00 - 12:50pm—420 Hamilton Hall
A wave of popular social movements has been transforming politics and social reality In Latin America. In the United States, Latinos/as are building on decades of organizing and demographic growth to claim a new public persona and challenge their marginal status. What are the significant areas of political action, and how can we understand them? What claims can those disenfranchised for reasons of race, class or national origin make on societies? We will discuss a number of important social movements throughout the region, while developing tools for understanding social movements and their possibilities.



CSER W3919 Sec 001
MODES OF INQUIRY
Fennell, Catherine­­—W 2:10pm-4:00pm—420 Hamilton Hall
*Major Requirement
Must register for Lab Session Mondays 2:10-3:10pm. This class, a combination of a seminar and a workshop, will prepare students to conduct, write up and present original research. It has several aims and goals. First, the course introduces students to a variety of ways of thinking about knowledge as well as to specific ways of knowing and making arguments key to humanistic and social science fields. Second, this seminar asks students to think critically about the approaches they employ in pursuing their research.   The course will culminate in a semester project, not a fully executed research project, but rather an 8-10 page proposal for research that will articulate a question, provide basic background on the context that this question is situated in, sketch preliminary directions and plot out a detailed methodological plan for answering this question. Students will be strongly encouraged to think of this proposal as related to their thesis or senior project. Over the course of the semester, students will also produce several short exercises to experiment with research techniques and genres of writing.

 

CSER W3921 Sec 001 – LAB
MODES OF INQUIRY LAB
Instructor TBD—M 2:10pm-4:00pm—Location TBD
Co-requisites: Modes of Inquiry (CSER W3919) this lab session meets 5 times a semester, for an hour.

 

CSER W3923 Sec 001
LATINO & ASIAN AMERICAN MEMOIR
Handal, Nathalie —M 2:10pm – 4:00pm—420 Hamilton Hall
In this class, we will explore Latino and Asian American memoir, focusing on themes of immigration and duality. How do we construct identity and homeland when we are ‘multiple’? How do we define ourselves and how do others define us? By reading some of the most challenging and exciting memoirs by Latino and Asian Americans, we will attempt to answer these questions and/or at least try to understand these transnational and multicultural experiences. This class combines the critical with the creative—students have to read and critic memoirs as well as write a final 10page nonfiction creative writing piece. *Students will also have the opportunity to speak to some Latino and Asian authors in class or via SKYPE. Students will be asked to prepare questions in advance for the author—whose work(s) we will have read and discussed. This usually arises interesting and thought-provoking conversations and debates. This 'Dialogue Series' within the class exposes students to a wide-range of voices and offers them a deeper understanding of the complexity of duality.

 

CSER W3926 Sec 001
LATIN MUSIC AND IDENTITY
Morales, Edward —T 2:10pm – 4:00pm—420 Hamilton Hall
Latin music has had a historically strained relationship with mainstream music tastes, exploding in occasional 'boom' periods, and receding into invisibility in others. What if this were true because it is a space for hybrid construction of identity that directly reflects a mixture of traditions across racial lines in Latin America. This course will investigate Latin music's transgression of binary views of race in Anglo-American society, even as it directly affects the development of pop music in America. From New Orleans jazz to Texas corridos, salsa, rock, and reggaeton, Latin music acts as both as a soundtrack and a structural blueprint for the 21st century's multicultural experiment. There will be a strong focus on studying Latin music's political economy, and investigating the story it tells about migration and globalization.

 

CSER W3905 Sec 001
ASIAN AMERICAN & PSYCHOLOGY OF RACE
Han, Shinhee —W 11:00am – 12:50pm—420 Hamilton Hall
This seminar provides an introduction to mental health issues for Asian Americans.  In particular, it focuses on the psychology of Asian Americans as racial/ethnic minorities in the United States by exploring a number of key concepts: immigration, racialization, prejudice, family, identity, pathology, and loss.  We will examine the development of identity in relation to self, family, college, and society.  Quantitative investigation, qualitative research, psychology theories of multiculturalism, and Asian American literature will also be integrated into the course.

 

CSER W3490 Sec 001
POST 9/11 IMMIGRATION POLICIES
OuYang, Elizabeth —R 11:00am – 12:50pm—420 Hamilton Hall
Since September 11, 2001, there has been an avalanche of immigration enforcement policies and initiatives proposed or implemented under the guise of national security. This course will analyze the domino effect of the Patriot Act, the Absconder Initiative, Special Registration, the Real I.D. Act, border security including the building of the 700 mile fence along the U.S./Mexico border, Secured Communities Act-that requires the cooperation of state and local authorities in immigration enforcement, the challenge to birthright citizenship, and now the congressional hearings on Islamic radicalization. Have these policies been effective in combating the war on terrorism and promoting national security? Who stands to benefit from these enforcement strategies? Do immigrant communities feel safer in the U.S.? How have states joined the federal bandwagon of immigration enforcement or created solutions to an inflexible, broken immigration system?

 

CSER W3963 Sec 001
NATIVE AMERICAN ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT
Press, Daniel —R 2:10pm – 4:00pm—420 Hamilton Hall
While casinos have pulled a number of small tribes out of poverty, the vast majority of Indians living on reservations continue to live at a level of poverty that is the equivalent of that found in third world countries or worse. For example, the life expectancy of a male on the Pine Ridge Reservation is lower than that of a male in most African countries. The course will explore the various approaches Indian tribes have or could take to promote the economies on their reservation, seeking to determine what elements produce a successful outcome. Areas to be explored include the role of tribal governments in economic development, land as an economic asset, gaming, energy and minerals development, finance, labor, individual entrepreneurship and the opportunity for multi- tribal companies. The course will begin with a review of basic theories of economic development and an exploration of lessons learned from economic development in underdeveloped nations.

 

CSER W3922 Sec 001
ASIAN AMERICAN CINEMA
Gamalinda, Eric —R 6:10pm – 8:00pm—420 Hamilton Hall
This seminar focuses on the critical analysis of Asian representation and participation in Hollywood by taking a look at how mainstream American cinema continues to essentialize the Asian and how Asian American filmmakers have responded to Orientalist stereotypes. We will analyze various issues confronting Asian American communities, including "yellowface"; white patriarchy; male and female stereotypes; the "model minority" myth; "Chinatowns" as spectacle; panethnicity; the changing political interpretations of the term "Asian American" throughout American history; gender and sexuality; and cultural hegemonies and privileging within the Asian community. Feature films and documentaries will be supplemented by a substantial amount of literature to provide a solid grounding on race theory and help students examine Asian [mis] representation in mainstream media; we will then view some examples of contemporary Asian American films and discuss how they challenge culturally embedded stereotypes.

 

CSER G9000
DISSERTATION DEVELOP SEMINAR: RACE, ETHNICITY, AND MIGRATION
Tran, Van C. —M 12:10pm – 2:00pm—420 Hamilton Hall
This course is designed to guide graduate students through the process of producing a high-quality dissertation and to provide an interdisciplinary space for the critical examination of race, ethnicity, and immigration, among other topics.

 

G4390 section 001
BORDERS AND BOUNDARIES
Lomnitz, Claudio—T 4:10pm-6:pm—Location TBD
This graduate seminar focuses on the relationship between international borders and social boundaries within national societies. It has as its premise a double paradox of contemporary life: the hardening of ethnic and racial boundaries at a time when goods and information flow across national borders quite freely; and the racialization of social relations at a time when racial theories lack scientific prestige, and racial categories have become conspicuously unstable. The seminar explores anthropological, historical, political and aesthetic dimensions of the relationship between national borders and social boundaries in a comparative context, and develops a conceptual foundation for analysis of the relationship between borders and boundaries. 

 

V3120 section 001
HISTORICAL RITUALS IN LATIN AMERICA
Lomnitz, Claudio—TR 10:10am-11:25am – Location TBD

Anthropologists and historians of literacy and communication have emphasized the reliance on multi-vocal imagery in the organization of social and political life in Latin America. Historically, the salient role of image and of ritual in political ritual was fed by the chasm between literate and illiterate segments of the population. During the 20th century, however, the rise of mass politics on one hand, and television and other visual media on the other, gave a new lease on the vibrant relevance of historical ritual and myth in local political life. This course explores the role of religious and secular ritual and myth in framing historical processes. It makes special emphasis on the use of Catholic ritual, imagery, and mythology in the European conquest and colonization of the continent, and in revolution, nation building, civic life, and sexual politics, since the 19th century.

 

V3821 section 001
NATIVE AMERICA
Audra Simpson - T 2:10pm-4:00pm 603 Hamilton Hall
This is an undergraduate seminar that takes up primary and secondary sources and reflections to a) provide students with an historical overview of Native American issues and representational practices b) provide students with an understanding of the ways in which land expropriation and concomitant military and legal struggle have formed the core of Native-State relations and are themselves central to American and Native American history and culture c) provide students with an understanding of Native representational practices, political subjectivity and aspiration.

 

W4321 section 001
HUMAN IDENTITY: DNA, RACE, AND IDENTITY
Marya Pollack and Robert E. Pollack – W 2:10-4:00pm - Location TBD
The course focuses on human identity, beginning with the individual and progressing to communal and global viewpoints using a framework of perspectives from biology, genetics, medicine, psychiatry, religion and the law.

 

FALL 2014 CROSS-REFERENCED COURSES

Comparative Literature and Society W4220 section 001
NARRATIVE, HEALTH & SOCIAL JUSTICE
Instructor: Sayantani Dasgupta; T 10:10am-12:00pm

Ecology, Evolution and Environmental Biology W4700 section 001
RACE: TANGLED HIST-BIOL CONCEPT; RACE
Instructor: Jill Shapiro; Monday W 4:10pm-5:25pm.

Women's Studies W3940 section 001
QUEER THEORIES & HISTORIES
Instructor: Elizabeth Povinelli; T 4:10pm-6:00pm

Philosophy V2110 section 001
PHILOSOPHY & FEMENISM
Instructor: Christina Mercer; TR 1:10pm-2:25pm

Spanish BC3980 section 001
LATIN AMER & LATINO ART ARCHIVES
Instructor: Joaquin Barriendos; TR 2:40pm-3:55pm

History BC3980 section 001
WORLD MIGRATION
Instructor: Jose Moya; TR 11:40am-12:55pm

History W3618 section 001
THE MODERN CARIBBEAN
Instructor: Natasha J. Lightfoot; MW 2:40pm-3:55pm

School of International & Public Affairs U0030
REGIONAL SPECIALIZATION; LATIN AMERICA
Instructor: Jose Moya

History BC4870 section 001
GENDER & MIGRATN:GLOBAL PERSPC; GENDER& MIGRATN:GLOBAL PERSPC
Instructor: Jose Moya; T 2:10pm-4:00pm.

English W3618 section 001
NATIVE AMERICAN LITERATURE
John Gamber; M 12:10pm-2:00pm 309 Hamilton Hall

Art History W4089 section 001
NATIVE AMERICAN ART
Elizabeth Hutchinson; TR 4:10pm-5:25pm 612 Schermerhorn Hall

Law L6330 section 001
NATIVE AMERICAN LAW; FEDERAL INDIAN LAW
Steven McSloy; M 6:20pm-8:10pm

Middle East W3920 section 001
CONTEMP CULTURE IN ARAB WORLD
Joseph Massad; W 4:10pm-6:00pm 402 Hamilton Hall

Middle East W3000 section 001
THEORY AND CULTURE
Gil Anidjar; MW 11:40am-12:55pm TBA

Spanish W3692 section 001
LABOR CULTURE 20THC LATIN AMER
Karen Benezra; MW 2:40pm-3:55pm 206 Casa Hispánica

African Studies O2005 section 001
CARIBBEAN CULTURE & SOCIETIES
Maja Horn; MW 2:40pm-3:55pm

Anthropology V1002 section 001
THE INTERPRETATION OF CULTURE
Sarah Muir; MW 11:40am-12:55pm

Africana Studies BC2005 section 001
CARIBBEAN CULTURE & SOCIETIES
Maja Horn; MW 2:40pm-3:55pm

English W3733 section 001
SEM IN AMERICAN LIT & CULTURE; DEWEY TO OBAMA
Nicole Wallack; T 11:00am-12:50pm 511 Kent Hall

Africana Studies BC2510 section 001
FOOD, ETHNICITY, GLOBALIZATION
Kim Hall; TR 2:40pm-3:55pm

First-Year Seminar BC1228 section 001
ETHNICITY & SOCIAL TRANSFRMTN
Margaret Ellsberg; MW 1:10pm-2:25pm

African-American Studies C3930 section 002
TOPICS IN THE BLACK EXPERIENCE HIP HOP & SOCIAL INEQUALITY
R. L'Heureux Lewis; W 11:00am-12:50pm

African-American Studies W3030 section 001
AFRICAN-AMERICAN MUSIC
Kevin Fellezs; TR 4:10pm-5:25pm

East Asian W3405 section 001
GENRE, GENDER, MOD JAPANESE LITERATURE
Tomi Suzuki; T 2:10pm-4pm

Latin American Civilization C1020 section 001
PRIM TEXTS OF LATIN AMER CIVILIZATION
Christia Mercer; TR 4:10pm-6:00pm

Philosophy V2110 section 001
PHILOSOPHY & FEMENISM
TR 1:10pm-2:25pm

Africana Studies BC2006 section 001
INTRODUCTION AFRICAN DIASPORA
Instructor: Kaiama Glover; TR 11:40am-12:55pm 325 Milbank Hall (Barnard)

Art History W3898 section 001
YORUBA AND THE DIASPORA
Instructor: Zoe Strother; M 4:10pm-6:00pm 930 Schermerhorn Hall

Art History BC3950 section 001
PHOTOGRAPHY & VIDEO IN ASIA
Instructor: Christopher Phillips; W 6:10pm-8:pm

International Affairs U6643 section 001
POLITICL ECONOMY OF SOUTH ASIA
Instructor: S. Akbar Zaidi; T 11:00am-12:50pm 402 International Affairs Building.

History W4235 section 001
CENT ASIA:IMP LEGACIES,NEW IMG
Instructor: Gulnar T. Kendirbai; W 11:00am-12:50pm

Middle East W3445 section 001
SOCIETIES/CULTRS: INDIAN OCEAN
Instructor: Mana Kia; MW 2:40pm-3:55pm

Sociology W3671 section 001
MEDIA, CULTURE & SOCIETY
Instructor: Sudhir A. Venkatesh; MW 2:40pm-3:55pm - 602 Hamilton Hall

Sociology W3930 section 001
IMMIGRATION & ETHNIC IN ISRAEL
Instructor: Yinon Cohen; M 10:10am-12:00pm - 201D Philosophy Hall

Sociology W3980 section 001
IMMIGRANT NEW YORK
Instructor: Van Tran; W 10:10am-12:00pm

Political Science W3921 section 009
AMERICAN POLITICS SEMINAR; POLIT-IMMIGRANTS/IMMIGRATION
Instructor: Rodolfo de la Garza; T 4:10pm-6:00pm

Spring 2014 Courses

CSER Courses

CSER W1040
Critical Approaches to the Study of Ethnicity and Race
John Gamber — MW 4:10-5:25pm, 420 Hamilton Hall

*MAJOR REQUIREMENT
This course provides an introduction to central approaches and concepts animating the investigation of race and ethnicity. We will not treat either of these categories of difference as a given, nor as separable from other axes of social difference. Rather, we will apply an interdisciplinary and intersectional framework to illuminate how these concepts have come to emerge and cohere within a number of familiar and less familiar sociocultural and historical contexts. We will consider how racial and ethnic differentiation as fraught but powerful processes have bolstered global labor regimes and imperial expansion projects; parsed, managed and regulated populations; governed sexed and gendered logics of subject and social formation; and, finally, opened and constrained axes of self-understanding, political organization, and social belonging. Special attention will be given to broadening students' understanding of racial and ethnic differentiation beyond examinations of identity.

CSER W3701
US-Latino Cultural Production
Edward Morales — T 2:10-4:00pm, 420 Hamilton Hall

The course will investigate the possibility that hybrid constructions of identity among Latinos in the U.S. are the principal driving force behind the cultural production of Latinos in literature and film. There will be readings on the linguistic implications of “Spanglish” and the construction of Latino racial identity, followed by examples of literature, film, music and other cultural production that provide evidence for bilingual/bicultural identity as a form of adaptation to the U.S. Examples will be drawn from different Latino ethnicities from the Caribbean, Mexico and the rest of Latin America.

CSER W3940
Comparative Constitutional Challenges
Elizabeth OuYang — R 11:00am-12:50pm, 420 Hamilton Hall

This course will examine how the American legal system decided constitutional challenges affecting the empowerment of African, Latino and Asian American communities from the 19th century to the present. Topics include the role of the Supreme Court, the denial of citizenship and naturalization to slaves and immigrants, government sanctioned segregation, the internment of Japanese Americans during World War II, the prison industry, police brutality and racial profiling, post-9/11 immigration policies, and voting rights.

CSER W3445 *New Course*
City, Environment, and Vulnerability
Catherine Fennell — T 6:10pm-8:00pm, 401 Hamilton Hall

How are urbanites situated in place? What can that particular situation tell us about how urbanites will live, thrive and waste in those places? How do social divides like race and class render the situations of some more or less vulnerable to environmental harm or the physical constraints of place? This seminar takes up those questions through the lens of the urban built environment and the relations it establishes between urbanites, the things of their city and their material dimensions. We start with readings that challenge us to conceptualize the urban environment as an assemblage of bodies and things that impinge upon each other in consequential ways. We then move to several historical and ethnographic cases that foreground the stakes of these impingements in cities.

CSER W3221
African American History: From Slavery to the Great Migration
Melissa Milewski — MR 2:40pm – 3:55pm, Location TBA

This course examines the main currents in African American history from the Atlantic slave trade to the beginning of the twentieth century, focusing on the issues of slavery and freedom, citizenship, Reconstruction, disfranchisement and segregation, and racial uplift. We will look at African American history in new ways, analyzing black men and women’s ability to shape their own slave trades, their political mobilization in the nineteenth century U.S. South, the ways in which they enjoyed their newfound freedom, and their continuing fight for their rights. We will also read and discuss primary documents relating to these topics, including slave narratives, newspaper reports of rebellions, the Emancipation Proclamation, court testimony of black southerners, letters from freed people to the Freedmen’s Bureau, and first-person accounts of Ku Klux Klan violence.

CSER W3222
Nature and Power: Environmental History in North America
Karl Jacoby — TR 2:40-3:55pm, 302 Millbank Hall (Barnard)

Environmental history seeks to expand the customary framework of historical inquiry, challenging students to construct narratives of the past that incorporate not only human beings but also the natural world with which human life is intimately intertwined. As a result, environmental history places at center stage a wide range of previously overlooked historical actors such as plants, animals, and diseases. Moreover, by locating nature within human history, environmental history encourages its practitioners to rethink some of the fundamental categories through which our understanding of the natural world is expressed: wilderness and civilization, wild and tame, natural and artificial.

CSER W3970
Arabs in Literature and Film
Nathalie Handal — M 2:10-4:00pm, 420 Hamilton Hall

This course explores contemporary Arab American and the Arab Diaspora culture and history through literature and film produced by writers and filmmakers of these communities. As a starting historical point, the course explores the idea of Arabness, and examines the Arab migration globally, in particular to the U.S., focusing on three periods, 1875-1945, 1945-early 1960s, and late 1960s-present. By reading and viewing the most exciting and best-known literary works and films produced by these writers and filmmakers, students will attain an awareness of the richness and complexity of these societies. Additionally, students will read historical and critical works to help them have a deeper understanding of theses creative works. Discussions revolve around styles and aesthetics as well as identity and cultural politics. Some of the writers the class will cover include, Wajdi Mouawad, Diana Abu Jaber, Amin Maalouf, Tahar Ben Jelloun, Anthony Shadid, Hisham Matar and Adhaf Soueif.

CSER W3914
Approaches to Contemporary Native American Education
Dan Press — R 2:10-4:00pm, 420 Hamilton Hall

The seminar will examine the very high drop-out rate at high schools on Indian Reservations in this country and among indigenous populations in other countries and will explore possible approaches for addressing the problem. In seeking causes and solutions, the course will approach the drop-out rate both as an education issue and as a microcosm of the larger issues confronting tribal governments and Native populations. The course will explore a broad range of possible explanations and solutions, looking both at issues in the education system and ones in the broader Native American society.

CSER W3990
Senior Project Seminar
Keith Orejel — M 9:00-10:50am, 420 Hamilton Hall

*MAJOR REQUIREMENT, Must have first taken Modes of Inquiry
The final requirement for the major is completion of a Senior Essay, to be written in the spring of the senior year. Alternatively, students may fulfill this requirement by taking an additional seminar where a major paper is required or by writing an independent essay under the supervision of a faculty member. Seniors who wish to do a senior research project are required to take the Senior Project Colloquium in the fall of the senior year. Supporting coursework will include a one-point Fall term Practicum (a one-hour-and-fifteen-minute meeting per week) as well as a short exploratory writing exercise to prepare the groundwork for thesis writing in the spring. The Spring term, then, will consist of independent research and a three-point Senior Essays Colloquium and presentation in the end-of-year conference.

CSER W3913 *New Course*
Video as Inquiry
Prof. Frances Negrón-Muntaner — W 2:10pm-4:00pm, 420 Hamilton Hall

The goal of this course is to familiarize students with visual production, particularly video production, as a mode of inquiry to explore questions related to race, ethnicity, indigeneity and other forms of social hierarchy and difference. The class will include readings in visual production as a mode of inquiry and the basic craft of video production in various genres (fiction, documentary, and experimental). As part of the course, students will produce a video short and complete it by semester's end.

CSER W3931 *New Course*
Hispanic NY and Latinization US
Claudio Remeseira — R 6:10pm-8:00pm, Location: 420 Hamilton

This seminar is a survey of the cultural heritage that sustains this diversity. We will explore the history and the demographic evolution of New York’s Latino and Latin American population, its racial, ethnic, and religious make-up, and its longstanding tradition in arts, music, and literature; in this last regard, the bibliography includes fiction, non-fiction, and poetry originally written both in English and Spanish (English translations will be provided for students who do not read Spanish). We will also analyze the connections between New York’s Hispanic cultural tradition and the broader US culture, as well as its place in the Spanish-American intellectual world. Finally, we will address some of the most pressing social issues related to the immigration flow from Latin America and the increasingly decisive role played by Latinos in New York politics.

CSER W4482
Indigenous Peoples' Rights: From Local Identities to the Global Indigenous Movement
Elsa Stamatopoulou — TR - 4:10pm-5:25pm, 602 Hamilton Hall

Indigenous Peoples, numbering more that 370 million in some 90 countries and about 5000 groups and representing a great part of the world’s human diversity and cultural heritage, continue to raise major controversies and to face threats to their physical and cultural existence. The main task of this interdisciplinary course is to explore the complex historic circumstances and political actions that gave rise to the international Indigenous movement through the human rights agenda and thus also produced a global Indigenous identity on all continents, two intertwined and deeply significant phenomena over the past fifty years. We will analyze the achievements, challenges and potential of the dynamic interface between the Indigenous Peoples’ movement-one of the strongest social movements of our times- and the international community, especially the United Nations system.

CSER W3904
Rumor and Racial Conflict
Stuart Rockefeller — T 11:00am-12:50pm, 420 Hamilton Hall

This course will take a transnational look at the many ways that rumors, legends and conspiracy theories play a role in racial relations and conflict. From the judicial and popular riots in the U.S. justified by recurrent rumors of African-American insurrection, to accusations that French Jews were players in the ‘white slave trade,’ to tales of white fat-stealing monsters among indigenous people of Bolivia and Peru, rumors play a key role in constructing, enforcing and contesting regimes of racial identity and domination. In order to grasp rumor’s importance for race, we will need to understand how it works, so our readings will cover both instances of racialized rumor-telling, conspiracy theories and mass panics, and some key approaches to how rumors work as a social phenomenon.
This class is designed to give you an opportunity to do independent research; as a result, it will demand your intensive engagement, and your willingness both to master the information and concepts we cover in class, and to pursue a specific topic of your own choosing. You will all write a term paper based on book research and/or fieldwork.

CSER W3928
Colonization/Decolonization
*MAJOR REQUIREMENT Mae M Njai and Natasha J Lightfoot — R 2:10pm-4:00pm, 402 Hamilton Hall

This course explores the centrality of colonialism in the making of the modern world, emphasizing cross-cultural and social contact, exchange, and relations of power; dynamics of conquest and resistance; and discourses of civilization, empire, freedom, nationalism, and human rights, from 1500 to 2000.

CSER G9001
Dissertation Development Seminar
Karl Jacoby — M 11:00am-12:50pm, 420 Hamilton Hall

This class is designed with three objectives in mind. First to guide graduate students through the process of producing a high-quality dissertation. Second, to open up an interdisciplinary space for the critical examination of race, ethnicity, and indigeniety, among other topics. Third, to plan a conference linked to the participants’ projects for the spring semester of 2014.

Crosslisted Courses

African American Studies C3930 section 001
AFRICAN & ASIAN AMERICANS
Day/Time: R 2:10pm-4:00pm Location: TBA
Instructor: Mio Matsumoto

African American Studies G4080 section 002
FR CARIB INTELLECTURAL TRAD
Day/Time: M 11:00am-12:50pm Location: TBA
Instructor: Vivaldi Jean-Marie

African American Studies G4120 section 001
RACIAL DISPARITIES: CAUSES/CONS
Day/Time: M 2:10pm-4:00pm Location: TBA
Instructor: Carla L Shedd

Spring 2014 Sociology W3964 section 001
CARCERAL CONTINUUM RES PRACT;
Instructor: Carla Shedd; Monday 6:10pm-8:00pm 707 KNOX HALL

Spring 2014 Anthropology V3988 section 001
RACE/SEXUALITY-SCI & SOC PRAC
Instructor: Nadia Abu El-Haj; Tuesday 2:10pm-4:00pm

Spring 2014 Political Science W3245 section 001
RACE-ETHNICITY IN AMERCN PLTCS;
Instructor: Raymond Smith; Tuesday Thursday 1:10pm-2:25pm

Spring 2014 History BC3676 section 001
LAT AMER: MIGRATION/RACE/ETHN;
Instructor: Jose Moya; Tuesday Thursday 11:40am-12:55pm

Spring 2014 Africana Studies BC2006 section 001
INTRODUCTION AFRICAN DIASPORA
Instructor: Kaiama Glover; Tuesday Thursday 11:40am-12:55pm

Spring 2014 Anthropology V3983 section 001
IDEAS/SOCIETY IN THE CARIBBEAN
Instructor: David Scott Monday 11am-12:50pm

Spring 2014 Spanish BC3510 section 001
GENDER/SEXUALITY,LAT AM CLTRS;
Maja Horn; Tuesday Thursday 11:40am-12:55pm

Spring 2014 Africana Studies BC3562 section 001
CARIBBEAN SEXUALITIES;
Instructor: Maja Horn; Tuesday 2:10pm-4:00pm

Spring 2014 Women's Studies W4317 section 001
ADVANCED TOPICS; GENDER, CULTURE, AND RIGHTS;
Instructor: Lila Abu-Lughod; Wednesday 11:00am-12:50pm

Spring 2014 Anthropology V1002 section 001
THE INTERPRETATION OF CULTURE;
Catherine Fennell; Tuesday Thursday 4:10pm-5:25pm

Spring 2014 Sociology W3671 section 001
MEDIA, CULTURE & SOCIETY;
Instructor: Sudhir Venkatesh; Monday Wednesday 2:40pm-3:55pm

Spring 2014 Anthropology V3005 section 001
AFRICA: CULTURE & SOCIETY; SOCIETIES
Instructor: Brian Larkin; Monday Wednesday 11:40am-12:55pm

Spring 2014 Comparative Literature: East Asian W4101
LIT & CULTURAL THRY:EAST/WEST
Instructor: Lydia Liu; Tuesday 2:10pm-4:00pm

Fall 2013 Courses

CSER Courses

CSER W3928 Sec 001
Colonization/Decolonization
Lean, E., and Haefeli, E.— R 2:10 - 4:00pm, Location: TBD

Corequisites: CSER W3928 is open only to CSER majors/concentrators. Others may be allowed to register with permission of the instructor. STUDENT ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 22 This course explores the centrality of colonialism in the making of the modern world, emphasizing cross-cultural and social contact, exchange, and relations of power; dynamics of conquest and resistance; and discourses of civilization, empire, freedom, nationalism, and human rights, from 1500 to 2000. Topics include pre-modern empires; European exploration, contact, and conquest in the new world; Atlantic-world slavery and emancipation; European and Japanese colonialism in Asia, Africa, the Middle East. The course ends with a section on decolonization and post-colonialism in the period after World War II. Intensive reading and discussion of primary documents.

CSER W1010 Sec 001
Introduction to Comparative Ethnic Studies
Gary Okihiro —TR 1:10 - 2:25pm, Location: TBD

An introduction to the historical and contemporary ideas and manifestations of "ethnic studies" as a field of study—its subject matters, its methodologies and theories, its literatures, and its practitioners and institutional settings.

CSER W3924 Sec 001
Latin American & Latino Social Movements
Rockefeller, Stuart —T 11:00 - 12:50pm, Location: TBD

In Latin America, a wave of new popular social movements has been transforming politics and social reality. In the United States, latino/a are building on decades of organizing and demographic growth to claim a new public persona and challenge their marginal status. What are the significant areas of political action, and how can we understand them? What claims can those disenfranchised for reasons of race, class or national origin make on societies? We will discuss a number of important social movements throughout the region, while developing tools for understanding social movements and their possibilities.

CSER W3919 Sec 001
Modes of Inquiry
Melissa Milewski —T 11:00am-12:50pm, Location: 420 Hamilton Hall

*Major Requirement
One of CSER's new required courses, Modes of Inquiry aims to introduce students to a variety of ways of knowing key to several fields that investigate racial and ethnic difference in social, cultural, political and economic life. The seminar will also ask students to think reflexively and critically about the approaches they employ and evaluate the ethics, constraints and potential of contemporary knowledge production about difference. The course will culminate in a semester project, an 8-10 page proposal for research that will ideally be related to the student senior project.

CSER W3923 Sec 001
Latino & Asian American American Memoir
Handal, Nathalie — M 2:10pm – 4:00pm, Location: 420 Hamilton Hall

In this class, we will explore Latino and Asian American memoir, focusing on themes of immigration and duality. How do we construct identity and homeland when we are ‘multiple’? How do we define ourselves and how do others define us? By reading some of the most challenging and exciting memoirs by Latino and Asian Americans, we will attempt to answer these questions and/or at least try to understand these transnational and multicultural experiences. This class combines the critical with the creative—students have to read and critic memoirs as well as write a final 10page nonfiction creative writing piece. *Students will also have the opportunity to speak to some Latino and Asian authors in class or via SKYPE. Students will be asked to prepare questions in advance for the author—whose work(s) we will have read and discussed. This usually arises interesting and thought-provoking conversations and debates. This 'Dialogue Series' within the class exposes students to a wide-range of voices and offers them a deeper understanding of the complexity of duality.

CSER W3926 Sec 001
Latin Music and Identity
Morales, Edward — T 2:10pm – 4:00pm, Location: 420 Hamilton Hall

Latin music has had a historically strained relationship with mainstream music tastes, exploding in occasional 'boom' periods, and receding into invisibility in others. What if this were true because it is a space for hybrid construction of identity that directly reflects a mixture of traditions across racial lines in Latin America. This course will investigate Latin music's transgression of binary views of race in Anglo-American society, even as it directly affects the development of pop music in America. From New Orleans jazz to Texas corridos, salsa, rock, and reggaeton, Latin music acts as both as a soundtrack and a structural blueprint for the 21st century's multicultural experiment. There will be a strong focus on studying Latin music's political economy, and investigating the story it tells about migration and globalization.

CSER W3935 Sec 001
History of the US-Mexico Border
Lomnitz, Claudio — W 9:00am – 10:50am, Location: 420 Hamilton Hall

This course is an introduction to the historical formation of the US-Mexican border. Beginning in the 1980s, border crossing became an academic rage in the humanities and the social sciences. This was a consequence of globalization, a historical process that reconfigured the boundaries between economy, society and culture, and it was also a primary theme of post-modernist aesthetics, which celebrated playful borrowing of multiple and diverse historical references. Places like Tijuana or El Paso, with their rather seedy reputation, had until then been of interest principally to local residents, but they now became exemplars of post-modern "hybridity," and were meant to inspire the kind of transnational scholarship that is required in today's world. Indeed, the border itself became a metaphor, a movable imaginary boundary that marks ethnic and racial distinction in American and Mexican cities.

CSER W3905 Sec 001
Asian American & Psychology of Race
Han, Shinhee — W 11:00am – 12:50pm, Location: 420 Hamilton Hall

This seminar provides an introduction to mental health issues for Asian Americans. In particular, it focuses on the psychology of Asian Americans as racial/ethnic minorities in the United States by exploring a number of key concepts: immigration, racialization, prejudice, family, identity, pathology, and loss. We will examine the development of identity in relation to self, family, college, and society. Quantitative investigation, qualitative research, psychology theories of multiculturalism, and Asian American literature will also be integrated into the course.

CSER W3490 Sec 001
Post 9/11 Immigration Policies
OuYang, Elizabeth — R 11:00am – 12:50pm, Location: 420 Hamilton Hall

STUDENT ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 22
Since September 11, 2001, there has been an avalanche of immigration enforcement policies and initiatives proposed or implemented under the guise of national security. This course will analyze the domino effect of the Patriot Act, the Absconder Initiative, Special Registration, the Real I.D. Act, border security including the building of the 700 mile fence along the U.S./Mexico border, Secured Communities Act-that requires the cooperation of state and local authorities in immigration enforcement, the challenge to birthright citizenship, and now the congressional hearings on Islamic radicalization. Have these policies been effective in combating the war on terrorism and promoting national security? Who stands to benefit from these enforcement strategies? Do immigrant communities feel safer in the U.S.? How have states joined the federal bandwagon of immigration enforcement or created solutions to an inflexible, broken immigration system?

CSER W3941 Sec 001
Race & the Law in US History
Milewski, Melissa L. — T 4:10pm – 6:00pm, Location: 420 Hamilton Hall

This seminar explores race in American courts beginning with Native Americans’ loss of their land and ending with recent debates over affirmative action and criminal sentencing. We will examine how the courts worked to uphold the power of elites – upholding slavery, affirming segregation, shaping immigration law, and regulating marriage across racial lines. At the same time, we will study how the courts provided opportunities for Americans to challenge restrictions based on race and at times allowed them to exercise their rights as citizens even when other branches of government did not. In addition to reading articles and books examining these questions, we will analyze cases from local and appeals courts and study the actions of litigants, lawyers, witnesses, jury members, and judges.

CSER W3911 Sec 001
Issues in Modern Native American Tribal Government
Press, Daniel — R 2:10-4:00pm, Location:420 Hamilton Hall

The seminar will examine the development of modern tribal governments, the issues they face developing effective tribal institutions, whether the Western form of government imposed on tribes by the Federal government raises inherent conflicts with tribal values and culture, whether the Federal trust status of Indian lands is a benefit or a barrier, the efforts to deliver effective health and educational services on reservations, and an examination of innovative approaches to reservation economic development. The seminar will explore what governance approaches have or have not succeeded and what lessons can be learned from those approaches. Certain of the seminar classes will feature presentations by Indian leaders engaged in innovative governmental or economic initiatives.

CSER W3922 Sec 001
Asian American Cinema
Gamalinda, Eric — R 6:10pm – 8:00pm, Location: 420 Hamilton Hall

This seminar focuses on the critical analysis of Asian representation and participation in Hollywood by taking a look at how mainstream American cinema continues to essentialize the Asian and how Asian American filmmakers have responded to Orientalist stereotypes. We will analyze various issues confronting Asian American communities, including "yellowface"; white patriarchy; male and female stereotypes; the "model minority" myth; "Chinatowns" as spectacle; panethnicity; the changing political interpretations of the term "Asian American" throughout American history; gender and sexuality; and cultural hegemonies and privileging within the Asian community. Feature films and documentaries will be supplemented by a substantial amount of literature to provide a solid grounding on race theory and help students examine Asian [mis] representation in mainstream media; we will then view some examples of contemporary Asian American films and discuss how they challenge culturally embedded stereotypes.

CSER W3916 Sec 001
Native American & Indigenous Film
Gamber, John — W 2:10pm – 4:00pm, Location: 420 Hamilton Hall

*Must have first taken Modes of Inquiry
This course will examine filmic representations by Native American and Indigenous filmmakers, screenwriters, producers, and directors in order to query the ways that these Native artists construct and communicate Indigenous self, community, and nation. In many ways these films serve to counter certain stereotypes of Native people, especially those found in films throughout cinematic history, serving a pedagogical purpose for outgroup, non-Native audiences. However, many especially more recent works move away from such autoethnographic purposes, targeting Indigenous audiences and participating in allusive conversations with and between Indigenous artistic works from a variety of genres. We will spend much of our time discussing the role of place throughout these films. Many of these films and texts assert that the acceptance of this containment ideology represents a kind of self-perpetuating colonizing. In place of such intellectual colonization, they examine the need to recognize the importance of generative indigenous movements, the ways that Native communities and/or individuals come to establish a sense of home or belonging in new spaces, whether those spaces are locations of forced or freely chosen relocations.

Fall 2013 Cross-Referenced Courses

English W3150 section 001
Immigration, Relocation, Diaspora
Day/Time: TR 4:10pm-5:25pm Location TBA
Instructor: John Gamber
The master narrative of the United States has always vacillated between valorizations of movement and settlement. While ours is a nation of immigrants, one which privileges its history of westward expansion and pioneering, trailblazing adventurers, we also seem to long for what Wallace Stegner called a "sense of place," a true belonging within a single locale. Each of these constructions has tended to focus on individuals with a tremendous degree of agency in terms of where and whether they go. However, it is equally important to understand the tension between movement and stasis within communities most frequently subjected to spatial upheavals. To that end, this course is designed to examine narratives of immigration, migration, relocation, and diaspora by authors of color in the United States.

Anthropology W3935 section 001
Locating South Asian Diaspora
Day/Time: W 9:00am-10:50am Location: TBA
Instructor: Claudio Lomnitz

History: W3523 section 001
Health Inequality: Modern US
Day/Time: MW 10:10pm-11:26ampm Location: TBA
Instructor: Samuel K Roberts

Sociology G4121 section 001
Racial & Ethnic Inequality
Day/Time: T 11:00am-12:50pm Location: TBA
Instructor: Carla L She'd

Sociology G4370 section 001
Product of Stratifiction/Inequality
Day/Time: T 4:10pm-6:00pm Location: TBA
Instructor: Seymour Spilerman

Political Science BC3402 section 001
Comp Pol of Gender Inequality
Day/Time: W 2:10pm-4:00pm Location: TBA
Instructor: Claire F. Ullman

African-American Studies C3930 section 001
Topics in Black Experience Hip Hop & Social Inequality
Day/Time: R 11:00pm-12:50pm Location: TBA
Instructor: R. L'Heureux Lewis

Middle East W4055 section 001
Crisis Works
Day/Time: MW 1:10pm-2:25pm Location: TBA
Instructor:

African-American Studies G4080 section 001
Trajectories AF-AM Religion
Day/Time: T 11:00pm-12:50pm Location: 758 Ext Schermerhorn
Instructor: Obery Hendricks

Asian Civilization: East Asian V2365 section 001
Intro to East Asian Civilization: Tibet
Day/Time: TR 4:10pm-5:25pm Location: TBA
Instructor: Gray Tuttle

Africana Studies BC3110 section 001
The Africana Colloquium—Coll: Critical Race Theory
Day/Time: W 2:10pm-4:00pm Location: TBA
Instructor: Kim Hall

Sociology W2420 section 001
Race & Place in Urban America
Day/Time: TR 2:40pm-3:55pm Location: TBA
Instructor: Carla Shedd

Women's Studies V3140 section 001
Race & Sexuality: Black Queers—Race & Sexuality: Black Queer
Day/Time: W 12:10pm-2:00pm Location: TBA
Instructor: Marcellus Blount

Latin American Civilization C1020 section 001
Prim Texts of Latin Amer Civilization
Day/Time: MW 4:10pm-6:00pm Location: TBA
Instructor: Pablo Piccato

History W3673 section 001
History of Latin american Pop Culture
Day/Time: MW 11:40am-12:55pm; Location: TBA
Instructor: Ana del Palacio Langer

Political Science W4461 section 001
Latin American Politics
Day/Time: TR 10:10am-11:25am; Location: TBA
Instructor: Maria Murillo

Middle East W3000 section 001
Theories & Culture: Mid East/s Asia
Day/Time: MW 10:10am-11:25am; Location: TBA
Instructor: Hamid Dabashi

Anthropology V2008 section 001
Film and Culture
Day/Time: W 7:30pm-10:30pm; Location: TBA
Instructor: Margaret McLagan

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Spring 2013 Courses

CSER Courses

CSER W1040 Sec 001
Introduction to Critical Approaches to the Study of Ethnicity and Race
David Clinton Wills—TR 6:10-7:25pm 420 Hamilton Hall

*MAJOR REQUIREMENT This course provides an introduction to central approaches and concepts animating the investigation of race and ethnicity. We will not treat either of these categories of difference as a given, nor as separable from other axes of social difference. Rather, we will apply an interdisciplinary and intersectional framework to illuminate how these concepts have come to emerge and cohere within a number of familiar and less familiar sociocultural and historical contexts. We will consider how racial and ethnic differentiation as fraught but powerful processes have bolstered global labor regimes and imperial expansion projects; parsed, managed and regulated populations; governed sexed and gendered logics of subject and social formation; and, finally, opened and constrained axes of self-understanding, political organization, and social belonging. Special attention will be given to broadening students' understanding of racial and ethnic differentiation beyond examinations of identity.

CSER W1012
History of Racialization of the US
Gary Okihiro—TR 1:10-2:25pm Location TBA

History of Racialization in the United States examines the development of race and racism through the study of significant historical circumstances that define the institutional structure of American Empire and of the resulting interactions among its peoples. Race is not static. Consequently, it is not an ahistorical object, predetermined identity, or uniform category of analysis. Traditionally, the history of American race relations is the contact between racially defined groups over time and space of the effort required to maintain social and economic differences among them

CSER W1601 Sec 001
Intro to Latino Studies
Frances-Negrón-Muntaner—MW 1:10-2:25pm Location TBA

This course provides an introductory, interdisciplinary discussion of the major issues surrounding this nation's Latino population. The focus is on social scientific perspectives utilized by scholars in the field of Latino Studies. Major demographic, social, economic, and political trends are discussed. Key topics covered in the course include: the evolution of Latino identity and ethnicity; the main Latino sub-populations in the United States; the formation of Latino communities in the United States; Latino immigration; issues of race and ethnicity within the Latino population; socioeconomic status and labor force participation of Latinos; Latino social movements; and the participation of Latinos in U.S. civil society.

CSER W3914 Sec 001
Approaches to Contemporary Native American Education
Dan Press—R 2:10-4:00pm 420 Hamilton Hall

The seminar will examine the very high drop-out rate at high schools on Indian Reservations in this country and among indigenous populations in other countries and will explore possible approaches for addressing the problem. In seeking causes and solutions, the course will approach the drop-out rate both as an education issue and as a microcosm of the larger issues confronting tribal governments and Native populations. The course will explore a broad range of possible explanations and solutions, looking both at issues in the education system and ones in the broader Native American society.

CSER W4481 Sec 001
Immigrants, Indigenous Peoples and Citizenship
Stuart Rockefeller—T 11:00am-12:50pm 420 Hamilton Hall

Immigrants and indigenous peoples are in some sense opposites (people from abroad vs. the original inhabitants of the land), but from the perspective of states they are curiously similar: they both fit awkwardly into the traditional role of citizen. By being too mobile, too different and drawing their identity from overseas, or being too identified with the soil and their ethnic groups, immigrants and indigenous people tend to resist the “liberal” model of what it is to be part of a national society. Consequently, citizenship has become a tool to marginalize and silence these groups. Focusing primarily on the United States and Bolivia, in this class we will look at what the experiences of immigrants and indigenous peoples tell us about the nature of citizenship, and learn how currents such as the DREAM Act movement, the idea of “cultural citizenship” and newly powerful indigenous movements in South America are removing control of citizenship from states, and transforming citizenship for everyone.

CSER W3928 Sec 001
Colonization/Decolonization
Claudio Lomnitz and Emmanuelle Saada—W 11:00am-12:50pm 420 Hamilton Hall

This course focuses on the spread of European influence and hegemony throughout the world from the age of discovery in the late-fifteenth and sixteenth century to the era of decolonization after World War II and postcolonial realities of the present. We are interested in the processes and contents of social and cultural contact and exchange, the development of knowledge, and how they shape relations of power; the place of colonialism in the development of Western capitalism; and the elements of colonial power and resistance, including ideologies of liberal political philosophy, social Darwinism, and nationalism. We will think about how ideas about civilization, religion, self and other, and freedom have evolved over time and shaped the making of the modern world. Class is held as a discussion seminar based on close reading of the primary-source documents.

CSER W3701 Sec 001
US-Latino Cultural Production
Edward Morales—W 2:10-4:00pm 420 Hamilton Hall

The course will investigate the possibility that hybrid constructions of identity among Latinos in the U.S. are the principal driving force behind the cultural production of Latinos in literature and film. There will be readings on the linguistic implications of “Spanglish” and the construction of Latino racial identity, followed by examples of literature, film, music and other cultural production that provide evidence for bilingual/bicultural identity as a form of adaptation to the U.S. Examples will be drawn from different Latino ethnicities from the Caribbean, Mexico and the rest of Latin America.

CSER W3940 Sec 001
Comparative Constitutional Challenges
Elizabeth OuYang—R 11:00am-12:50pm 420 Hamilton Hall

This course will examine how the American legal system decided constitutional challenges affecting the empowerment of African, Latino and Asian American communities from the 19th century to the present. Topics include the role of the Supreme Court, the denial of citizenship and naturalization to slaves and immigrants, government sanctioned segregation, the internment of Japanese Americans during World War II, the prison industry, police brutality and racial profiling, post-9/11 immigration policies, and voting rights.

CSER W3221 Sec 001
African American History: From Slavery to the Great Migration
Melissa Milewski—TR 10:10-11:25am Location TBA

This course examines the main currents in African American history from the Atlantic slave trade to the beginning of the twentieth century, focusing on the issues of slavery and freedom, citizenship, Reconstruction, disfranchisement and segregation, and racial uplift. We will look at African American history in new ways, analyzing black men and women’s ability to shape their own slave trades, their political mobilization in the nineteenth century U.S. South, the ways in which they enjoyed their newfound freedom, and their continuing fight for their rights. We will also read and discuss primary documents relating to these topics, including slave narratives, newspaper reports of rebellions, the Emancipation Proclamation, court testimony of black southerners, letters from freed people to the Freedmen’s Bureau, and first-person accounts of Ku Klux Klan violence.

CSER W3222 Sec 001
Latin Music and Identity
Karl Jacoby—TR 2:40-3:55pm Location TBA

Environmental history seeks to expand the customary framework of historical inquiry, challenging students to construct narratives of the past that incorporate not only human beings but also the natural world with which human life is intimately intertwined. As a result, environmental history places at center stage a wide range of previously overlooked historical actors such as plants, animals, and diseases. Moreover, by locating nature within human history, environmental history encourages its practitioners to rethink some of the fundamental categories through which our understanding of the natural world is expressed: wilderness and civilization, wild and tame, natural and artificial.

CSER W3901 Sec 001
Sex, Drugs and Women of Color
Sel J. Hwahng—T 2:10-4:00pm 420 Hamilton Hall

This course examines “women of color” as a socio-political constituency within historical and contemporary U.S. nation-state formation. How has and does the U.S. continually (re)-constitute itself through the use/exploitation/objectification/exoticization of women of color? Women of color will also be interrogated in relation to racial stratification, socio-economic inequities, and feminization of poverty. What are the ramifications for women of color in terms of health and well-being, including mortality/morbidity, sexual expression, physical and mental health outcomes, HIV risk, and substance/drug use? The positionality of Native American, African American, Latina, and Asian/Pacific Islander women will be examined through historical, social scientific, and public health literature. The category of “women of color” will also be scrutinized and unpacked, in which various imbrications and divergences among anatomically-female-born and anatomically-male-born women of color (including the identities of women, two-spirit, lesbian/bisexual, WSW/M, transwomen/transfeminine-spectrum, fem queens, travestis, transvestites, aggressives/AGs, transmasculine-spectrum/masculine of center) will also be discussed.

CSER W3970
Arabs in Literature and Film
Nathalie Handal—M 2:10-4:00pm 420 Hamilton Hall
This course explores contemporary Arab American and the Arab Diaspora culture and history through literature and film produced by writers and filmmakers of these communities. As a starting historical point, the course explores the idea of Arabness, and examines the Arab migration globally, in particular to the U.S., focusing on three periods, 1875-1945, 1945-early 1960s, and late 1960s-present. By reading and viewing the most exciting and best-known literary works and films produced by these writers and filmmakers, students will attain an awareness of the richness and complexity of these societies. Additionally, students will read historical and critical works to help them have a deeper understanding of theses creative works. Discussions revolve around styles and aesthetics as well as identity and cultural politics. Some of the writers the class will cover include, Wajdi Mouawad, Diana Abu Jaber, Amin Maalouf, Tahar Ben Jelloun, Anthony Shadid, Hisham Matar and Adhaf Soueif.

CSER W3990
Senior Project Seminar
Katherine Heupel – M 9:00-10:50am 420 Hamilton Hall
*Must have first taken Modes of Inquiry
The final requirement for the major is completion of a Senior Essay, to be written in the spring of the senior year. Alternatively, students may fulfill this requirement by taking an additional seminar where a major paper is required or by writing an independent essay under the supervision of a faculty member. Seniors who wish to do a senior research project are required to take the Senior Project Colloquium in the fall of the senior year. Supporting coursework will include a one-point Fall term Practicum (a one-hour-and-fifteen-minute meeting per week) as well as a short exploratory writing exercise to prepare the groundwork for thesis writing in the spring. The Spring term, then, will consist of independent research and a three-point Senior Essays Colloquium and presentation in the end-of-year conference.

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Fall 2012 Courses

CSER Courses

CSER W1010 Sec 001
Introduction to Comparative Ethnic Studies
Okihiro, Gary - TR 1:10P -2:25P Location TBA

An introduction to the historical and contemporary ideas and manifestations of "ethnic studies" as a field of study—its subject matters, its methodologies and theories, its literatures, and its practitioners and institutional settings.

CSER W3210
Che: Texts and Contexts of a Global Icon
Negrón-Muntaner, Frances – MW 1:10P-2:25P Location TBA

By most accounts, Ernesto "Che" Guevara is both one of the most famous people in history and a strong theoretical and political influence on a broad range of social movements. Yet, despite Guevara's political and cultural status, serious study of his life, work, and impact is rare.

This course then has three main objectives: to familiarize students with the political trajectory of Ernesto Guevara; examine the key concepts associated with his political praxis; and analyze the complex process by which an arguably failed guerrilla fighter and anti-capitalist statesman became a political inspiration to millions as well as one the most commodified image in the world. In the course, however, we will not be concerned with ascertaining who the "real" Guevara was. Instead, the course will focus on Guevara as a way study to examine the various historical, cultural, technological, and commodification processes by which one person's life becomes almost anything that a consumer wants it to be.

CSER W3935 Sec 001
Historical Anthropology of the US-Mexican Border
Lomnitz, Claudio - T - 9:00A-10:50A Location TBA

This course is an introduction to the historical formation of the US-Mexican border. Beginning in the 1980s, border crossing became an academic rage in the humanities and the social sciences. This was a consequence of globalization, a historical process that reconfigured the boundaries between economy, society and culture, and it was also a primary theme of post-modernist aesthetics, which celebrated playful borrowing of multiple and diverse historical references. Places like Tijuana or El Paso, with their rather seedy reputation, had until then been of interest principally to local residents, but they now became exemplars of post-modern "hybridity," and were meant to inspire the kind of transnational scholarship that is required in today's world. Indeed, the border itself became a metaphor, a movable imaginary boundary that marks ethnic and racial distinction in American and Mexican cities.

CSER W3490 Sec 001
Post 9/11 Immigration Policies
OuYang, Elizabeth – R - 11:00A-12:50P 420 Hamilton Hall

Since September 11, 2001, there has been an avalanche of immigration enforcement policies and initiatives proposed or implemented under the guise of national security. This course will analyze the domino effect of the Patriot Act, the Absconder Initiative, Special Registration, the Real I.D. Act, border security including the building of the 700 mile fence along the U.S./Mexico border, Secured Communities Act-that requires the cooperation of state and local authorities in immigration enforcement, the challenge to birthright citizenship, and now the congressional hearings on Islamic radicalization. Have these policies been effective in combating the war on terrorism and promoting national security? Who stands to benefit from these enforcement strategies? Do immigrant communities feel safer in the U.S.? How have states joined the federal bandwagon of immigration enforcement or created solutions to an inflexible, broken immigration system?

CSER W3924 Sec 001
Latin American and Latino Social Movements
Rockefeller, Stuart - W - 11:00A-12:50P Location TBD

In Latin America, a wave of new popular social movements has been transforming politics and social reality. In the United States, latino/as are building on decades of organizing and demographic growth to claim a new public persona and challenge their marginal status. What are the significant areas of political action, and how can we understand them? What claims can those disenfranchised for reasons of race, class or national origin make on societies? We will discuss a number of important social movements throughout the region, while developing tools for understanding social movements and their possibilities.

CSER W3905 Sec 001
Asian Americans and the Psychology of Race
Han, Shinhee – W - 11:00A-12:50P Location TBD

This seminar provides an introduction to mental health issues for Asian Americans. In particular, it focuses on the psychology of Asian Americans as racial/ethnic minorities in the United States by exploring a number of key concepts: immigration, racialization, prejudice, family, identity, pathology, and loss. We will examine the development of identity in relation to self, family, college, and society. Quantitative investigation, qualitative research, psychology theories of multiculturalism, and Asian American literature will also be integrated into the course.

CSER W3919 Sec B01
Modes of Inquiry (Lab Session)
Instructor TBD– W - 10:00A-10:50A 420 Hamilton Hall

CSER W3919 Sec 001
Modes of Inquiry
Instructor Melissa Milewski – M - 09:00A-10:50A 420 Hamilton Hall
*Major Requirement

One of CSER's new required courses, Modes of Inquiry aims to introduce students to a variety of ways of knowing key to several fields that investigate racial and ethnic difference in social, cultural, political and economic life. The seminar will also ask students to think reflexively and critically about the approaches they employ and evaluate the ethics, constraints and potential of contemporary knowledge production about difference. The course will culminate in a semester project, an 8-10 page proposal for research that will ideally be related to the student senior project.

CSER W3923 Sec 001
Latino and Asian Memoir
Handal, Nathalie - M – 2:10p-4P - 420 Hamilton Hall

In this class, we will explore Latino and Asian American memoir, focusing on themes of immigration and duality. W.E.B. Du Bois wrote in The Souls of Black Folk: "It is a peculiar sensation, this double-consciousness, this sense of always looking at one's self through the eyes of others.... One ever feels his two-ness...; two souls, two thoughts, two un- reconciled strivings; two warring ideals in one dark body, whose dogged strength alone keeps it from being torn asunder." How do we construct identity and homeland when we are 'multiple'? How do we define ourselves and how do others define us? By reading some of the most challenging and exciting memoirs by Latino and Asian Americans, we will attempt to answer these questions and/or at least try to understand these transnational and multicultural experiences. This class combines the critical with the creative—students have to read and critic memoirs as well as write a final 10page nonfiction creative writing piece.

*Students will also have the opportunity to speak to some Latino and Asian authors in class or via SKYPE. Students will be asked to prepare questions in advance for the author—whose work(s) we will have read and discussed. This usually arises interesting and thought-provoking conversations and debates. This 'Dialogue Series' within the class exposes students to a wide-range of voices and offers them a deeper understanding of the complexity of duality.

CSER W3922 Sec 001
Asian American Cinema
Gamalinda, Eric - R - 6:10-8:00PM 420 Hamilton Hall

This seminar focuses on the critical analysis of Asian representation and participation in Hollywood by taking a look at how mainstream American cinema continues to essentialize the Asian and how Asian American filmmakers have responded to Orientalist stereotypes. We will analyze various issues confronting Asian American communities, including "yellowface"; white patriarchy; male and female stereotypes; the "model minority" myth; "Chinatowns" as spectacle; panethnicity; the changing political interpretations of the term "Asian American" throughout American history; gender and sexuality; and cultural hegemonies and privileging within the Asian community. Feature films and documentaries will be supplemented by a substantial amount of literature to provide a solid grounding on race theory and help students examine Asian [mis] representation in mainstream media; we will then view some examples of contemporary Asian American films and discuss how they challenge culturally embedded stereotypes.

CSER W3926 Sec 001
Latin Music and Identity
Morales, Edward - T - 02:10P-04:00P – 420 Hamilton Hall

Latin music has had a historically strained relationship with mainstream music tastes, exploding in occasional "boom" periods, and receding into invisibility in others. What if this were true because it is a space for hybrid construction of identity that directly reflects a mixture of traditions across racial lines in Latin America? This course will investigate Latin music's transgression of binary views of race in Anglo-American society, even as it directly affects the development of pop music in America. From New Orleans jazz to Texas corridos, salsa, rock, and reggaetón, Latin music acts as both as a soundtrack and a structural blueprint for the 21st century's multicultural experiment. There will be a strong focus on studying Latin music's political economy, and investigating the story it tells about migration and globalization.

CSER W3928 Sec 001
Colonization/Decolonization
Jacoby, Karl - T - 11:00A-12:50P 420 Hamilton Hall

This course focuses on the spread of European influence and hegemony throughout the world from the age of discovery in the late fifteenth and sixteenth century to the era of decolonization after World War II and postcolonial realities of the present. We are interested in the processes and contents of social and cultural contact and exchange, the development of knowledge, and how they shape relations of power; the place of colonialism in the development of western capitalism; and the elements of colonial power and resistance, including ideologies of liberal political philosophy, social Darwinism, and nationalism. We will think about how ideas about civilization, religion, self and other, and freedom have evolved over time and shaped the making of the modern world. Class is held as a discussion seminar based on close reading of the primary-source documents.

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Spring 2012 Courses

CSER Courses

CSER W1040
Critical Approaches to the Study of Ethnicity and Race
Prof. David Clinton Wills – MW 5:40pm-6:55pm – 420 Hamilton Hall
*Major Requirement

This course provides an introduction to central approaches and concepts animating the investigation of race and ethnicity. We will not treat either of these categories of difference as a given, nor as separable from other axes of social difference. Rather, we will apply an interdisciplinary and intersectional framework to illuminate how these concepts have come to emerge and cohere within a number of familiar and less familiar socio-cultural and historical contexts. We will consider how racial and ethnic differentiation as fraught but powerful processes have bolstered global labor regimes and imperial expansion projects; parsed, managed and regulated populations; governed sexed and gendered logics of subject and social formation and finally, opened and constrained axes of self-understanding, political organization and social belonging. Special attention will be given to broadening students' understanding of racial and ethnic differentiation beyond examinations of identity. Taken together, theoretical and empirical readings, discussions and outside film screenings will prepare students for further coursework in race and ethnic studies, as well as fields such as literary studies, women's studies, history, sociology and anthropology.

CSER V3440
The Changing American City
Prof. Cassie Fennel – M 11:00-12:50 - 420 Hamilton Hall

This seminar will develop practical inroads into the problem of the changing American city that will complement and complicate commonplace intuitions about the urban change we witness unfolding around us. Readings stay close to anthropological and ethnographic perspectives. We will consider how focusing on the meanings and experiences of everyday life in urban spaces can both complement and problematize the ideals we often associate with urban living and urban places, including diversity, authenticity and democracy. Additional readings will introduce students to analytical perspectives on urbanism, race and ethnicity, place and space, and citizenship. Taken together, readings, primary materials, discussions and a field trip will equip students with the tools to begin approaching contemporary urban change with an anthropological lens.

CSER W4482
Indigenous Peoples' Rights:
From Local Identities to the Global Indigenous Movement

Prof. Elsa Stamatopoulou – TR - 4:10pm-5:25pm – 602 Hamilton Hall

Indigenous Peoples, numbering more that 370 million in some 90 countries and about 5000 groups and representing a great part of the world's human diversity and cultural heritage, continue to raise major controversies and to face threats to their physical and cultural existence. The main task of this interdisciplinary course is to explore the complex historic circumstances and political actions that gave rise to the international Indigenous movement through the human rights agenda and thus also produced a global Indigenous identity on all continents, two intertwined and deeply significant phenomena over the past fifty years. We will analyze the achievements, challenges and potential of the dynamic interface between the Indigenous Peoples' movement-one of the strongest social movements of our times- and the international community, especially the United Nations system.

CSER W3911
Issues in Modern Native American Tribal Governments
Daniel S. Press – R 2:10-4:00pm - 420 Hamilton Hall
*New Course

This course, "Issues in Modern Native American Tribal Government" will explore the dynamics of and issues facing present tribal governments and the other major institutions on reservations, examining their legal authorities and the kinds of institutions tribes have created to carry out their governmental and economic development responsibilities, reviewing the historical record of these institutions, including their successes and failures, and exploring innovative approaches that have or could be adopted to strengthen tribal governments and improve the socio-economic conditions on reservations. The seminar will involve group discussion based on the readings, experiences students and the instructor have had working with tribal governments, and five presentations over the course of the semester by Native American leaders from different fields who are working to address the major issues tribal governments and their members are presently facing.

CSER W3701
US-Latino Cultural Production
Prof. Edward Morales - T 2:10pm-4:00pm - 420 Hamilton Hall

The course will investigate the possibility that hybrid constructions of identity among Latinos in the U.S. are the principal driving force behind the cultural production of Latinos in literature and film. There will be readings on the linguistic implications of "Spanglish" and the construction of Latino racial identity followed by examples of literature, film, music and other cultural production that provide evidence for bilingual/bicultural identity as a form of adaptation to the U.S. Examples will be drawn from different Latino ethnicities from the Caribbean, Mexico and the rest of Latin America.

CSER W3940
Comparative Constitutional Challenges
Prof. Elizabeth OuYang - W 11:00am-12:50pm - 420 Hamilton Hall

This course will examine how the American legal system decided constitutional challenges affecting the empowerment of African, Latino and Asian American communities from the 19th century to the present. Topics include the role of the Supreme Court, the denial of citizenship and naturalization to slaves and immigrants, government sanctioned segregation, the interment of Japanese Americans during World War II, the prison industry, police brutality and racial profiling, post 9-11 immigration policies, and voting rights.

CSER W3904
Rumor and Racial Conflict
Prof. Stuart Rockefeller – T 11:00am-12:50pm – 628 Kent Hall

This course will take a transnational look at the many ways that rumors, legends and conspiracy theories play a role in racial relations and conflict. From the judicial and popular riots in the U.S. justified by recurrent rumors of African-American insurrection, to accusations that French Jews were players in the 'white slave trade,' to tales of white fat-stealing monsters among indigenous people of Bolivia and Peru, rumors play a key role in constructing, enforcing and contesting regimes of racial identity and domination. In order to grasp rumor's importance for race, we will need to understand how it works, so our readings will cover both instances of racialized rumor-telling, conspiracy theories and mass panics, and some key approaches to how rumors work as a social phenomenon.

This class is designed to give you an opportunity to do independent research; as a result, it will demand your intensive engagement, and your willingness both to master the information and concepts we cover in class, and to pursue a specific topic of your own choosing. You will all write a term paper based on book research and/or fieldwork.

CSER W3990
Senior Project Seminar
(Formerly Senior Thesis Paper Seminar)

Sarah E. Vaughn – W 11:00am-12:50pm – 319 Hamilton Hall – Library Room


CSER W3918
Transnational Trans/Gender-Variant Social Formations:
Political Economics and Health Disparities

Prof. Sel J. Hwahng – T 4:10pm-6pm – 420 Hamilton Hall
*New Course

This course contextualizes contemporary trans/gender-variant identities and communities within global social formations and political and economic inequities. Contemporary trans/gender-variant social formations in Central America, South America, South Asia, and Southeast Asia will be examined along with indigenous trans/gender-variant communities in North America, Africa, and the Pacific Islands, and diasporic trans/gender-variant communities in North America and Western Europe. Discussions of trans/gender-variant social formations will be framed by historical, political, and economic contexts, and how transnational flows of global capital have impacted trans/gender-variant identities. There will also be comparative analyses between trans/gender-variant social formations and other sexual minority communities, and between trans/gender-variant communities from various geographies. Particular attention will also be paid to health disparities among trans/gender-variant communities, especially in relation to HIV/STI and mental health vulnerabilities. Health disparities will be used as a measure of trans/gender-variant stigma, social marginalization, racial stratifications, and geopolitical power distributions, and in particular affect many trans/gender-variant people of color and communities globally (including in the U.S.).

MUSIC W4427
Music and Critical Theory in Latin America
Prof. Ana Maria Ochoa - R 4:10pm-5:25pm – 620 Dodge Hall

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Fall 2011 Courses

CSER Courses

CSER W3919
Modes of Inquiry
Prof. Catherine Fennell – W 2:10pm-4:00pm - 402 Hamilton
Lab Session - M 2:10pm-3:00pm - 402 Hamilton
*NOTE: Major Requirement

One of CSER's new required courses, Modes of Inquiry aims to introduce students to a variety of ways of knowing key to several fields that investigate racial and ethnic difference in social, cultural, political and economic life. The seminar will also ask students to think reflexively and critically about the approaches they employ and evaluate the ethics, constraints and potential of contemporary knowledge production about difference. The course will culminate in a semester project, an 8-10 page proposal for research that will ideally be related to the student senior project.

CSER W3928
Colonization/Decolonization
Prof. Mae Ngai and Prof. Chris Brown - W 11:00am-12:50pm - 420 Hamilton

This course focuses on the spread of European influence and hegemony throughout the world from the age of discovery in the late fifteenth and sixteenth century to the era of decolonization after World War II and postcolonial realities of the present. We are interested in the processes and contents of social and cultural contact and exchange, the development of knowledge, and how they shape relations of power; the place of colonialism in the development of western capitalism; and the elements of colonial power and resistance, including ideologies of liberal political philosophy, social Darwinism, and nationalism. We will think about how ideas about civilization, religion, self and other, and freedom have evolved over time and shaped the making of the modern world. Class is held as a discussion seminar based on close reading of the primary-source documents.

CSER W1010
Introduction to Comparative Ethnic Studies
Prof. Gary Okihiro – TR 1:10pm-2:25 pm - 417 International Affairs Bldg
Syllabus TBA

Introduction to the field of comparative ethnic studies.

CSER W3510
Immigration, Relocation, and Diaspora
Prof. John Gamber – TR 2:40-3:55pm - 517 Hamilton

The master narrative of the United States has always vacillated between valorizations of movement and settlement. While ours is a nation of immigrants, one which privileges its history of westward expansion and pioneering, trailblazing adventurers, we also seem to long for what Wallace Stegner called a "sense of place," a true belonging within a single locale. Each of these constructions has tended to focus on individuals with a tremendous degree of agency in terms of where and whether they go. However, it is equally important to understand the tension between movement and stasis within communities most frequently subjected to spatial upheavals. To that end, this course is designed to examine narratives of immigration, migration, relocation, and diaspora by authors of color in the United States.

CSER W3250
Native American Representations
Prof. John Gamber – T 4:10-6pm- 420 Hamilton Hall
*NOTE: formerly Representations of Native America

All too often, the general population's ideas about American Indians are shaped by representations that do not come from Indian people. These often stereotyping images of Native Americans shape not only popular, but even indigenous notions about what Indians are or ought to be. This course is designed to provide students with a background in the ways that Native people have represented themselves, whether they are writing/creating back against outside portrayals or creating for their own expression. This is an ethnic studies course. As such we will be addressing issues including indigeneity, race, ethnicity, privilege, and marginalization. We will also address the intersections between these issues and those of class, gender, and sexuality.

CSER W3926
Latin Music and Identity
Prof. Ed Morales - W 2:10pm -4:00pm – 420 Hamilton

Latin music has had a historically strained relationship with mainstream music tastes, exploding in occasional "boom" periods, and receding into invisibility in others. What if this were true because it is a space for hybrid construction of identity that directly reflects a mixture of traditions across racial lines in Latin America? This course will investigate Latin music's transgression of binary views of race in Anglo-American society, even as it directly affects the development of pop music in America. From New Orleans jazz to Texas corridos, salsa, rock, and reggaetón, Latin music acts as both as a soundtrack and a structural blueprint for the 21st century's multicultural experiment. There will be a strong focus on studying Latin music's political economy, and investigating the story it tells about migration and globalization.

CSER W3905
Asian Americans and the Psychology of Race
Prof. Shinhee Han – R 11:00am -12:50pm - 420 Hamilton

This seminar provides an introduction to mental health issues for Asian Americans. In particular, it focuses on the psychology of Asian Americans as racial/ethnic minorities in the United States by exploring a number of key concepts: immigration, racialization, prejudice, family, identity, pathology, and loss. We will examine the development of identity in relation to self, family, college, and society. Quantitative investigation, qualitative research, psychology theories of multiculturalism, and Asian American literature will also be integrated into the course.

CSER W3922
Asian American Cinema
Prof. Eric Gamalinda- R 6:10-8:00pm – 420 Hamilton

*New syllabus TBA
This seminar focuses on the critical analysis of Asian representation and participation in Hollywood by taking a look at how mainstream American cinema continues to essentialize the Asian and how Asian American filmmakers have responded to Orientalist stereotypes generated by Hollywood. We will analyze various issues confronting Asian American communities, including yellowface, white patriarchy, male and female stereotypes, the "model minority" myth, depictions of "Chinatowns," panethnicity, the changing political interpretations of the term "Asian American" throughout American history, gender and sexuality, and cultural hegemonies and privileging within the Asian community.

CSER W3970
Palestine and the Palestinians Through Literature and Theater
Prof. Nathalie Handal - T 2:10pm-4:00pm – 420 Hamilton
*NEW COURSE

This course explores contemporary Palestinian culture, history, and society through literature and theater produced by Palestinian writers and playwrights, including those in the West Bank, Israel, other Arab countries, and the West. The course will examine Palestinianess, looking at the various cultural and socio-political issues prevalent in plays, poetry, non-fiction and fiction. Discussions revolve around styles and aesthetics as well as identity and cultural politics. Students will also read critical and theoretical works in order to better help them understand the works. Some of the writers the class will cover include, Mahmoud Darwish, Faqwa Tuqan, Sayed Kashua, Mourid Barghouti, and Naomi Shihab Nye.

CSER W1601
Introduction to Latino/a Studies
Prof. Frances Negrón-Muntaner - MW 1:10pm-2:25pm - 503 Hamilton

The objective of this course is to provide an interdisciplinary introduction to Latino studies and some of its most salient debates, including the constitution of Latino identity, immigration, the relationship of Latinos to the labor force, racialization processes, gender dynamics, and sexual politics, among others.

CSER W3490
Critical Analysis of Post 9/11 Immigration Policies
Prof. Elizabeth R. OuYang - R 11:00am-12:50pm - 522C Kent Hall
*NEW COURSE, Syllabus TBA

Since September 11, 2001, there has been an avalanche of immigration enforcement policies and initiatives proposed or implemented under the guise of national security. This course will analyze the domino effect of the Patriot Act, the Absconder Initiative, Special Registration, the Real I.D. Act, border security including the building of the 700 mile fence along the U.S./Mexico border, Secured Communities Act-that requires the cooperation of state and local authorities in immigration enforcement, the challenge to birthright citizenship, and now the congressional hearings on Islamic radicalization. Have these policies been effective in combating the war on terrorism and promoting national security? Who stands to benefit from these enforcement strategies? Do immigrant communities feel safer in the U.S.? How have states joined the federal bandwagon of immigration enforcement or created solutions to an inflexible, broken immigration system?

CSER W3903
Immigrant Social Movements
Prof. Stuart Rockefeller, T 11:00am–12:50pm – 420 Hamilton
*NEW COURSE

The course would make much use of Ong's Flexible Citizenship, also drawing on Das Gupta's Unruly Immigrants, and I would hope to spend some time talking about Chavez & Chicanismo as well as Benmayor's (and others') work on cultural citizenship, early 20th Century Italian and Jewish anarchists, and spend some time on Argentina, specifically Bolivians there. Maybe something on exiled Latin American intellectuals, if I can find good sources. It would be a way to look at how displaced/marginal peoples find a basis to claim a public personhood, and look at fights over citizenship and transnationalism. I'm most interested in immigrants going beyond 'immigrant-rights' activism, to actively working on the 'host' society)

CSER W3909
Critical Approaches to Race, Gender, and Human Movements, Past and Present
Prof. Ikuko Asaka - R 2:10pm-4:00pm – 420 Hamilton
*NEW COURSE

Narratives of human movements have long generated concepts and practices of race, gender, and sexuality. In turn, institutional structures have dictated how people move, informed by ideas about human differences, and continue to reproduce social, economic, and political hierarchies. This seminar highlights mobility as an interpretive framework for analyzing modes of difference-making as well as for illuminating marginalized people’s efforts to unsettle hegemonic boundaries defined at local, national, and transnational levels. Drawing on case studies within and beyond the United States, the seminar examines forms of mobility inflected by race, gender, and sexuality, looking at human movements of the past and present formed within such contexts as imperial rule, diaspora, exile, tourism, and (im) migration. Primary topics include: mobility and cultural production; transportation as a mechanism of inequality; mobility as a cultural weapon for racialized and gendered subjects; and the presumption of heterosexuality in immigration and citizenship discourses. .


ICORE/MORE Courses

ENGL BC3196
Home to Harlem: Literature of the Harlem Renaissance
Instructor: Monica L. Miller - MW 10:35am-11:50am - 302 Barnard Hall

AFRS BC3005
Introduction to Caribbean Societies
Instructor: Maja Horn – TR 2:40pm-3:55pm – 302 Barnard Hall

AFRS BC3121
Black Women in America (same as WMST BC3121)
Instructor: Kim Hall – R 2:20pm-4:00pm 201 Lehman Hall (Barnard)

ANTH V3300
Pre-Columbian Histories of Native America
Instructor: Severin Fowles – TR 10:35am-11:50am Location TBA

HIST BC3321
Colonial Encounters
Instructor: Lisa Tiersten – MW 11:00am-12:15pm 405 Milbank Hall (Barnard)

RELI W4620
Religious Worlds of New York
Instructor: John S. Hawley, Courtney Bender – W 11:00am-12:50pm 201 80 Claremont Ave

SOCI V3324
Poverty, Inequality, and Policy
Instructor: Jacqueline Olvera – M 4:10pm-6pm – 227 Milbank Hall (Barnard)

AFRS BC3146
African American and African Writing and the Screen
Instructor: Yvette Christianse – T 4:10pm-6:00pm – 530 Altschul Hall (Barnard)

DNCE BC3570
Latin American and Caribbean Dance
Instructor: Paul A. Scolieri – TR 1:10pm-2:25pm – 302 Barnard Hall

AFRS BC3110
Africana Colloquium
Instructor: Kim F. Hall – W 12:pm-1:50pm – 405 Barnard Hall

HIST BC4587
Modern Representations of Slavery
Instructor: Celia E. Naylor – T 2:10pm-4:00pm – 201 Lehman Hall (Barnard)

CSER Cross-Referenced Courses

Ecology, Evolution and Environmental Biology W4700
Race: The Tangled History of a Biological Concept
Instructor: Jill Shapiro; M 4:10pm-5:25pm W 4:10pm-6:30pm 951 Schermerhorn

Sociology V2420
Race & Place in Urban American
Instructor: Carla Shedd; TR 2:40pm - 3:55pm – 503 Hamilton Hall

East Asian: Religion W4111
The Japanese Buddhist Temple
Instructor: David L. Moerman, Matthew P. McKelway; MW 10:35am-11:50am– 832 Schermerhorn Hall

East Asian W4106
Global Genres and East Asian Cinema
Instructor: Weihong Bao; T 4:10pm-6:00pm – Location TBA

History: East Asian W3850
Contemporary Chinese Culture and Society
Instructor: Guobin Yang; TR 2:40pm-3:55pm– Location TBA

East Asian W4557
Film and TV in Tibet - Inner Asia
Instructor: Robert J Barnett; M 4:10pm-6pm – 522B Kent Hall

East Asian W4357
Contemporary Japanese Cinema
Instructor: Hikari Hori
Lecture: W 6:10pm-8:00pm – 522C Kent Hall

English W3925
Advanced Topics - Asian-American Literature/Culture: Transnationalism, Diaspora, Cosmopolitanism
Instructor: Wen Jin; T 2:10pm-4:00pm – 201D Philosophy Hall

Anthropology V1007
The Origins of Human Society
Instructor: Severin Fowles; TR 2:40pm-3:55pm – 304 Barnard Hall

Anthropology W4172
Written Culture
Instructor: Brinkley Messick; R 2:10pm-4:00pm– 467 Schermerhorn Hall

Anthropology V2008
Film and Culture
Instructor: Margaret Vail; T 7:30pm-10:30pm– 417 International Affairs Bldg.

Anthropology G6057
Government, Citizen, and Indigenous Political Criticism
Instructor: Audra Simpson; T 6:10pm-8:00pm - 963 Schermerhorn Hall

Anthropology V3465
Women and Gender in the Muslim World
Instructor: Lila Abu-Lughod; MW 11:00am-12:15pm– 413 Kent Hall

Anthropology G8014
Advanced Study - South Asian History/Culture
Advanced Topics in American Culture

Instructors: Partha Chatterjee, Nicholas Dirks; M 2:10pm-4:00pm– 302 Fayerweather

American Studies G7020
American Cultural Criticism
Instructors: Casey Blake, Ross Posnock; T 4:10pm-6:00pm– 317 Hamilton Hall

Anthropology G6057
Government, Citizen and Indigenous Political Criticism
Instructor: Audra Simpson; T 6:10pm-8:00pm – Location: 963 Schermerhorn Hall

History: East Asian W3850
Contemporary Chinese Culture and Society
Instructor: Guobin Yang; TR 2:40pm-3:55pm– 328 Milbank Hall (Barnard)

African-American Studies C3930
Topics in the Black Experience: Black Masculinity
Instructor: Marcellus Blount; M 4:10pm-6:00pm – 758 Ext. Schermerhorn

African-American Studies C3930
Topics in the Black Experience: Exploring Black Chicago
Instructor: Carla L. Shedd; T 11:00am-12:50pm – 758 Ext. Schermerhorn Hall

Women's Studies G6820
Studies in the Novel: Novel and Feminist Theory
Instructor: Marrianne Hirsch; M 2:10pm-4:00pm - 754 Ext. Schermerhorn Hall

Women's Studies V3112
Feminist Texts II
Instructor: Lisa Tiersten M 2:10pm-4:00pm – 201 Lehman Hall

Women's Studies BC2140
Critical Approaches
Instructor: Lisa Tiersten; TR 9:10pm-10:25am – 409 Barnard Hall

Women's Studies W4310
Contemporary American Jewish Women's Literature
Instructor: Irena Klepfisz; T 4:10pm-6:00pm – 227 Milbank Hall (Barnard)

African-American Studies G4080
Topics in the Black Experience: Racial and Social Formations
Instructor: Gary Okihiro; W 6:10pm-8:00pm 758 Ext Schermerhorn Hall SCH

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Spring 2011 Courses

CSER Courses

CSER W3919
Modes of Inquiry
Prof. Frances Negrón-Muntaner - M 2:10pm-4:00pm - 420 Hamilton
*New Major Requirement

One of CSER's new required courses, Modes of Inquiry aims to introduce students to a variety of ways of knowing key to several fields that investigate racial and ethnic difference in social, cultural, political and economic life. The seminar will also ask students to think reflexively and critically about the approaches they employ and evaluate the ethics, constraints and potential of contemporary knowledge production about difference. The course will culminate in a semester project, an 8-10 page proposal for research that will ideally be related to the student senior project.

CSER W1040
Critical Approaches to the Study of Ethnicity and Race
Prof. John Gamber - MW 5:40pm-6:55pm – Location TBA
*New Major Requirement

This course provides an introduction to central approaches and concepts animating the investigation of race and ethnicity. Special attention will be given to broadening students' understanding of racial and ethnic differentiation beyond examinations of identity. Taken together, theoretical and empirical readings, discussions and outside film screenings will prepare students for further coursework in race and ethnic studies, as well as fields such as literary studies, women's studies, history, sociology and anthropology.

CSER W1010
Introduction of Asian American Studies
Prof. Gary Okihiro - TR 2:40pm-3:55pm – Location TBA

Introduction to the field of Asian American studies, including a history of Asians and Pacific Islanders in the U.S., the field's multiple pivots around race, gender, sexuality, class, and nation, and contemporary concerns of identities, community, culture, and location within the U.S. and world.

CSER W1012
History of Racialization in the US
Prof. Gary Okihiro - TR 1:10pm-2:25pm – Location TBA

An introductory history of racializations in the U.S., including the intersections of racializations with expansion and conquest, science and explanation, gender and sexuality, geography and place, and the policing of those classification schemes and borders and their violations.

CSER W3701
US-Latino Cultural Production
Prof. Ed Morales - T 2:10pm-4:00pm – 420 Hamilton

The course will investigate the possibility that hybrid constructions of identity among Latinos in the U.S. are the principal driving force behind the cultural production of Latinos in literature and film. There will be readings on the linguistic implications of "Spanglish" and the construction of Latino racial identity followed by examples of literature, film, music and other cultural production that provide evidence for bilingual/bicultural identity as a form of adaptation to the U.S. Examples will be drawn from different Latino ethnicities from the Caribbean, Mexico and the rest of Latin America.

CSER W3906
Race in Scientific & Social Practice
Prof. Cassie Fennell - M 11:00am-12:50pm – 420 Hamilton

In this class we will approach race from a variety of disciplinary and intellectual perspectives, including: critical race theory/philosophy, anthropology, history and history of science and medicine. We will focus on the development and deployment of the race concept since the mid-19th century. Students will come to understand the many ways in which race has been conceptualized, substantiated, classified, managed and observed in (social) science and medicine. We will also explore the practices and effects of race (and race-making)in familiar and less familiar social and political worlds. More specifically, we will address a series of questions, both historical and contemporary. How does the concept of race shift over time? With what consequences? What is the relationship between philological commitment to ?a family of languages? And the development of a modern, biological concept of race? How has the relationship between "race" and "culture" been articulated in the history of anthropology in particular, and in racial theory more broadly? Can there be a concept of race without phenotype? A solely genotypic racial grouping? Most broadly this class puts the history of biology back into contemporary conversations about race, in order to consider the epistemological and critical achievements and limitations of existing arguments regarding the nature and politics of race.

CSER W3907
Asian American Genders/Sexualities
Prof. Sel J Hwahng - W 2:10pm-4:00pm - 420 Hamilton

This course will cover such topics as Asian wartime sexual traumas, femininity and feminizations, feminist/women of color discourses, overseas and domestic sex industries and sex work, LGBTQ identities and movements, health and gender/sexuality, alternative masculinities, and intra-racial and inter-racial dating and miscegenation. This course will discuss social scientific, humanities, fiction, non-fiction, and public health literature, supplemented with film/video, in order to think about, and re-think, the racialized construction of sex, gender, erotics, and sexuality.

CSER W3924
Latin American & Latino Social Movements
Prof. Stuart Rockefeller - T 11:00am-12:50pm - 420 Hamilton

In Latin America, a wave of new popular social movements has been transforming politics and social reality. In the United States, latino/as are building on decades of organizing and demographic growth to claim a new public persona and challenge their marginal status. What are the significant areas of political action, and how can we understand them? What claims can those disenfranchised for reasons of race, class or national origin make on societies? We will discuss a number of important social movements throughout the region, while developing tools for understanding social movements and their possibilities.

CSER W3935
Historical Anthropology of the US-Mexican Border
Prof. Claudio Lomnitz - W 11:00am-12:50pm – Location TBA

This course is an introduction to the historical formation of the US-Mexican border. Beginning in the 1980s, border crossing became an academic rage in the humanities and the social sciences. This was a consequence of globalization, a historical process that reconfigured the boundaries between economy, society and culture, and it was also a primary theme of post-modernist aesthetics, which celebrated playful borrowing of multiple and diverse historical references. Places like Tijuana or El Paso, with their rather seedy reputation, had until then been of interest principally to local residents, but they now became exemplars of post-modern "hybridity," and were meant to inspire the kind of transnational scholarship that is required in today's world. Indeed, the border itself became a metaphor, a movable imaginary boundary that marks ethnic and racial distinction in American and Mexican cities.

CSER W3937
Caribbean Modernism
Prof. Amy Clukey - R 2:10pm-4:00pm – 420 Hamilton

This course will examine circum-Caribbean literature from the early to mid twentieth century. We'll pay particular attention to how writers alternately embraced, adapted, challenged, and subverted European models of modernism and modernity. Course discussions will focus on major themes in Caribbean literature, including creolization and hybridity, decolonization and liberation movements, neo-imperialism, diaspora, identity, as well as the relations between the Caribbean, the United States, and the United Kingdom. We'll begin with a brief introduction to West Indian history and two major texts of postcolonial theory before turning to fiction and poetry that radically reworks European models, recovers revolutionary origins and collective history, reconstructs transatlantic and transnational influences, and demonstrates the impact of Caribbean culture on metropolitan Europe.

CSER W3940
Comp. Study of Constituional Challenge
Prof. Elizabeth Ouyang - W 4:10pm-6:00pm - 420 Hamilton

CSER W3990
Senior Thesis Seminar
Prof. Frances Negrón-Muntaner - Day/Hour/Location TBA

CSER W4482
Indigenous Peoples Rights: From Local Identities to the Global Indigenous Movement
Prof. Elsa Stamatopoulou - TR 4:10pm-5:25pm – 420 Hamilton

The main task of the course is to explore the complex historic circumstances and political actions that gave rise to the international Indigenous movement through the human rights agenda and thus also produced a global indigenous identity. Taking an interdisciplinary approach, the course will analyze the interaction between the Indigenous movement and the intergovernmental system over the past 50 years paying special attention to its questioning and impact on international norms, institutions and major global debates. We will examine the contributions and challenges of the Indigenous agenda to human rights, political science, ethnic studies, development studies and international law, among others.

ICORE/MORE Courses

AFRS BC 3550
Harlem Seminar: Gay Harlem
Prof. Hiram Perez - M 4:10pm-6:00pm – Location TBA

RELI V2615
Religions of Harlem
Professors Josef Sorett, Obery Hendricks – TR 11:00am-12:15pm - 603 Hamilton

AFEN BC 3525
Atlantic Crossings: The West Indies in the Atlantic World
W 4:10pm-6:00pm– Location TBA

HIST BC 3980
World Migration
Prof. Jose Moya – TR 10:35am-11:50am– Location TBA

HIST BC 4411
Race in the Making of the U.S.
Prof. Elizabeth Esch - Monday 2:10pm-4:00pm – Location TBA

SOCI V 3247
Immigrant Experience, Old and New
Prof. Jacqueline Olvera - TR 1:10pm-2:25pm – Location TBA

SOCI BC 3907
Communities and Social Change
Prof. Jacqueline Olvera - T 11:00am-12:50pm – Location TBA

SOCI BC 3909
Ethnic Conflict and Unrest
Prof. Jacqueline Olvera - W 4:10pm-6:00pm – Location TBA

WMST W 3915
Gender and Power in Transnational Perspective
Prof. Elizabeth Bernstein – R 2:10pm-4:00pm – Location TBA

AFTH BC 3150
Race and Performance in The Caribbean
Prof. Maja Horn – W 2:10pm-4:00pm – Location TBA

AFRS BC 3120
History of African-American Music
Prof. William Lowe - T 6:10pm-8:00pm – Location TBA

AHIS BC 3650
Native American Art
Prof. Elizabeth Hutchinson - TR 4:10pm-5:25pm – Location TBA

ANTH V 3160
The Body and Society
Prof. Lesley Sharp –MW 10:35am-11:50am - Location TBA

ENGL BC 3140 Section 009
Seminars in Special Themes: Black Internationalisms
Prof. Yvette Christianse – MW 2:40-3:55 – Location TBA

HIST BC 4587
Modern Representations of Slavery
Prof. Celia E. Naylor – R 11am-12:50pm – Location TBA

WMST BC 2530
Global South Women Film Directors
Prof. May Joseph – R 9am-10:50am – Location TBA

WMST BC 3134
Unheard Voices: African Women's Literature
Prof. Yvette Christianse – R 11:00am-12:50pm – Location TBA

AFRS BC 3110
Africana Colloquium: Theorizing Diaspora
Prof. Tina M Campt – R 2:10pm-4:00pm – Location TBA

DNCE BC 3577
Performing the Political: Embodying Change in American Performance
MW 10:35am-11:50am – Location TBA

WMST W 4308y
Advanced Topics in Women's and Gender Studies: Sexuality and Science
Prof. Rebecca M Young - W 11:00am-12:50pm – Location TBA

CSER Cross Listed Courses

Anthropology W4480
Crit. Native/Indigenous Studies
Prof. Audra Simpson - MW 10:35am-11:50am – Location TBA

American Studies W3931
Hispanic New York and the Latinoization of the US
Prof. Claudio I Remeseira - R 4:10pm-6:00pm – Location TBA
*Attend first class for instructor's permission.

African-American Studies G4080 Section 007
Topics in the Black Experience - Race and Racism
Prof. Jean-Marie Vivaldi - R 4:10pm-6:00pm - Location TBA

Interdepartment Seminar W4321
Topics in the Black Experience - Race and Racism
Prof. Robert E Pollack - W 2:10pm-4:00pm - Location TBA
*Send e-mail to instructor for permission pollack@columbia.edu.

Religion W4826
Religion, Race, and Slavery
Prof. Jonathan Schorsch - R 2:10pm-4:00pm - Location TBA

History W4584
Race, Technology, and Health / US History
Prof. Samuel K Jr Roberts - W 4:10pm-6:00pm – Location TBA
*Application requires: see undergraduate seminar section of Departments of History website

Political Science BC3303
Colloquium on Race, Gender and American Political Development
Prof. Kimberley Johnson – W 11:00am-12:50pm– Location TBA

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Fall 2010 Courses

CSER Courses

ASAM W3900x African-American and Asian American Relations
Gary Okihiro ~ W 2:10 - 4:00 PM ~ Location TBA

ASAM W3918x Asian Americans and the Psychology of Race
Shinhee Han ~ W 11:00 AM - 12:50 PM ~ 420 Hamilton Hall
Syllabus

This seminar provides an introduction to mental health issues for Asian Americans. In particular, it focuses on the psychology of Asian Americans as racial/ethnic minorities in the United States by exploring a number of key concepts: immigration, racialization, prejudice, family, identity, pathology, and loss. We will examine the development of identity in relation to self, family, college, and society. Quantitative investigation, qualitative research, psychology theories of multiculturalism, and Asian American literature will also be integrated into the course.

ASAM W3922x Asian American Cinema
Eric Gamalinda ~ R 8:10 AM - 10:00 PM ~ 420 Hamilton
Syllabus

This seminar focuses on the critical analysis of Asian representation and participation in Hollywood by taking a look at how mainstream American cinema continues to essentialize the Asian and how Asian American filmmakers have responded to Hollywood Orientalist stereotypes. We will analyze various issues confronting the Asian American, including yellowface, white patriarchy, male and female stereotypes, the "model minority" myth, depictions of "Chinatowns," panethnicity, the changing political interpretations of the term "Asian American" throughout American history, gender and sexuality, and cultural hegemonies and privileging within the Asian community.

CSER W1010x Introduction to Comparative Ethnic Studies
Gary Okihiro ~ T/R 1:10 - 2:25 PM ~ Location TBA
Syllabus

An introduction to the historical and contemporary ideas and manifestations of "ethnic studies" as a field of study--its subject matters, its methodologies and theories, its literatures, and its practitioners and institutional settings. (MC)

CSER V3440 U.S. Cities in Transition
Catherine Fennell ~ M 2:10 - 4:00 PM ~ Location TBA

After decades of economic disinvestment, physical decline and social out-migration, the 1990s ushered in an era of urban revitalization in many U.S. cities, the effects of which resonate today. How can we situate these recent changes within a longer trajectory of urban change in the United States? What do we make of the contested claims on space, belonging and identity made by, or on behalf of, people living in changing urban places? How should we evaluate development interventions whose end results seem so often to diverge from their intentions? This course will develop practical inroads into the problem of the changing American city that will both complement and complicate commonplace intuitions about the urban change we witness unfolding around us. Readings stay close to anthropological and ethnographic perspectives. We will consider how focusing on the meanings and experiences of everyday life in urban spaces can problematize ideals often associated with urban living, including various forms of diversity. Additional readings will introduce students to analytical perspectives on urbanism, race, ethnicity, space and citizenship. Taken together, readings, primary materials, discussions and a field trip will equip students with the tools to approach contemporary urban change with an anthropological lens.

CSER W3510x Immigration, Relocation, and Diaspora
John Gamber ~ T/R 2:40 PM - 3:55 PM ~ Location TBA

The master narrative of the United States has always vacillated between valorizations of movement and settlement. While ours is a nation of immigrants, one which privileges its history of westward expansion and pioneering, trailblazing adventurers, we also seem to long for what Wallace Stegner called a "sense of place," a true belonging within a single locale. Each of these constructions has tended to focus on individuals with a tremendous degree of agency in terms of where and whether they go. However, it is equally important to understand the tension between movement and stasis within communities most frequently subjected to spatial upheavals. To that end, this course is designed to examine narratives of immigration, migration, relocation, and diaspora by authors of color in the United States.

CSER W3904x Rumor and Racial Conflict
Stuart Rockefeller ~ T 11 AM - 12:50 PM ~ Location TBA
Syllabus

This course will take a transnational look at the ways that race and mass rumors have interacted. From the judicial and popular riots in the U.S. justified by recurrent rumors of African-American insurrection, to accusations that French Jews were players in the "white slave trade," to tales of white fat-stealing monsters among indigenous people of Bolivia and Peru, rumors play a key role in constructing, enforcing and contesting regimes of racial identity and domination. In order to grasp rumor's importance for race, we will need to understand how it works, so our readings will cover both (1) instances of racialized rumor-telling, conspiracy theories and mass panics and (2) some key approaches to how rumors work as a social phenomenon. I will expect you to post a response to the reading on Courseworks each week and to engage actively in class discussion. There will be an in-class midterm exam, and you will be able to choose between writing an independent research project or doing a take-home exam.

CSER W3912x Experimental Minority American Writing
Dorothy Wang ~ T 4:10 PM - 6 PM ~ 420 Hamilton
Syllabus

Critics reading minority writing often focus on its thematic, i.e., sociological, content. Such literature is usually presumed to be inseparable from the "identity"/body of the writer and is read as autobiographical, ethnographic, representational, and exotic. At the other end of the spectrum, avant-garde writing is seen to concern itself "purely" with formal questions, divorced from the socio-historical and unsullied by the taint of race. In the critical realm we currently inhabit, in which "race" is opposed to the "avant-garde," an experimental minority writer can indeed seem an oxymoron. In this class we will closely read recent work by Asian American, African American, Native American and Latino/a writers that challenges preconceptions about ethnic literature, avant-garde writing, and genre categorization, among other things. The writing done by these mostly young, mostly urban, poets and fiction writers is some of the most exciting work being written in the United States today; their texts push the boundaries of aesthetic form while simultaneously engaging questions of culture, politics, and history. Reading them forces us to rethink our received notions about literature.

CSER W3918x Transnational Trans/Gender-Variant Social Formations
Sel Hwahng ~ W 2:10 PM - 4 PM ~ Room: 420 Hamilton
Syllabus

CSER W3928x Colonization/Decolonization
Claudio Lomnitz and Rashid I Khalidi ~ T 11:00 - 12:50 PM ~ 420 Hamilton
Syllabus

This course explores the centrality of colonialism in the making of the modern world, emphasizing cross-cultural and social contact, exchange, and relations of power; dynamics of conquest and resistance; and discourses of civilization, empire, freedom, nationalism, and human rights, from 1500 to 2000. Topics include premodern empires; European exploration, contact, and conquest in the new world; Atlantic-world slavery and emancipation; and European and Japanese colonialism in Asia, Africa, and the Middle East. The course ends with a section on decolonization and post-colonialism in the period after World War II. The course will include intensive reading and discussion of primary documents.

CSER W3933x Reading the Haitian Revolution
Amy Clukey ~ M 11 AM - 12:50 PM ~ 420 Hamilton
Syllabus

This course will look at the Haitian revolution in nineteenth- and twentieth-century transatlantic literature. Although we will read some texts in translation, our focus will be on the meanings attributed to the revolution in Anglophone culture. We will begin by placing the revolution within its eighteenth century context by looking at how revolutionaries situated themselves within the Atlantic world and European responses to the revolt. Next, we'll examine the revolution's influence on slavery and racial ideologies in the United States, before turning to its relationship to twentieth-century liberation theory and Caribbean aesthetics.

CSER W3990xy Senior Paper Colloquium
Frances Negron-Muntaner & TA Anjuli Kolb ~ R 2:10 - 4:00 PM

The Senior Paper Colloquium provides undergraduate seniors with an academic context in which to develop their senior papers/theses for the majors administered by the Center for the Study of Ethnicity and Race (Comparative Ethnic Studies, Latino/a Studies, Asian American Studies). The Colloquium is required for all students who want to write a senior paper/thesis. In the senior paper/thesis, students explore in depth some topic of special interest to them by conducting extensive background reading and research.

The Senior Paper Colloquium focuses primarily on developing students' ideas for their research projects and workshopping their written work. The course is designed to develop and hone the skills necessary to complete the senior paper. Students will receive guidance in researching for and writing an advanced academic paper. Conducted as a seminar, the colloquium provides the students a forum in which to discuss their work with each other. In the seminar, students will give and receive feedback and comment on each other's work. Though most of the course is devoted to the students' work, during the first weeks of the term, students will read and discuss several ethnic studies-oriented texts to help them gain insight into the kinds of research projects done in the field. These texts will serve as models on which students can base their own projects.

CSER G4030x Sound: The Sacred, the Secular
Ana María Ochoa ~ T 9 AM - 10:50 AM ~ 420 Hamilton
Syllabus

This class presents the relationship between sound, the sacred and the secular across different practices that negotiate the relation between the sacred and the secular, organized around three central axes. In the first part of the course, we critically explore the relationship between sound, the sacred and the secular. In the second part, we explore the problem of acoustic religious histories, located between the written word and different practices of sonic inscription in writing, recording, and live recitation. Due to the fact that it is centered on the relationship between written text and sound, the second part of the course focuses on the vocal dimensions of religious and/or popular music practice. In the third part, we turn to the relation between myth, nature, and sound. Throughout the course we explore different types of mediation of power through sound.

LATS W3200x Che Guevara: Texts and Contexts
Frances Negrón-Muntaner ~ M/W 1:10 - 2:25 PM
Syllabus

By most accounts, Ernesto "Che" Guevara is one of the most famous people in contemporary history and a strong theoretical and political influence on a broad range of social movements. Yet, despite Guevara's political and cultural status, serious study of his life, work, historical context, and impact is rare. This course has three objectives: to familiarize students with the political trajectory and thinking of Ernesto Guevara; study key concepts such as revolution, history and representation; and examine the various processes by which a person may become the subject of contradictory narratives and a wide assortment of commodities.

LATS W3928x Latin Music and Identity
Ed Morales ~ W 4:10 - 6:00 PM ~ 420 Hamilton Hall
Syllabus

Latin music has had a historically strained relationship with mainstream music tastes, exploding in occasional "boom" periods, and receding into invisibility in others. What if this were true because it is a space for hybrid construction of identity that directly reflects a mixture of traditions across racial lines in Latin America? This course will investigate Latin music's transgression of binary views of race in Anglo-American society, even as it directly affects the development of pop music in America. From New Orleans jazz to Texas corridos, salsa, rock, and reggaeton, Latin music acts as both a soundtrack and structural blueprint for the 21st century's multicultural experiment. There will be a strong focus on studying Latin music's political economy and investigating the story it tells about migration and globalization.

ICORE/MORE Courses

AFRS BC3005 INTRODUCTION TO CARIBBEAN SOCIETIES (3 points)
May Joseph

AFRS BC3055x SLAVE RESISTANCE (3 points)
Celia E Naylor

AFRS BC3110 ISSUES IN AFRICA/DIASPORA STUDIES (4 points)
Bashir Abu-Manneh

AFRS BC3146 AFRICAN-AMERICAN/AFRICAN WRITING & SCREEN (4 points)
Yvette Christianse

AFRS BC3560 HUMAN RIGHTS SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA (4 points)
J. Paul Martin

AFRS BC3570 ISSUES AFRICAN STUDIES: BLACK BAGHDAD (4 points)
Tina M Campt

AFRS BC3570 ENGENDERING BLACK BRITAIN (4 points)
Tina M Campt

ENG BC 3140x EXPLORATIONS IN BLACK LITERATURE: EARLY AFRICAN-AMERICAN LITERATURE (3 points)
Quandra Prettyman

ENG BC 3997x CONTEMPORARY AFRICAN-AMERICAN LITERATURE AND POST-RACIAL IDEOLOGIES (4 points)
Monica L Miller

ENG BC 3997x POLITICAL LOVE (4 points)
Bashir Abu-Manneh

HIST BC3454 HISTORY OF SEXUALITY IN U.S. (3 points)
Rosalind Rosenberg

HIST BC3321x COLONIAL ENCONUTERS: EUROPE AND THE CULTURE OF EMPIRE (3 points)
Lisa Tiersten

SOC V3324x POVERTY, INEQUALITY, AND POLICY (4 points)
Jacqueline Olvera

WMST BC2140 CRITICAL APPROACHES TO CULTURAL AND SOCIAL THEORY (3 points)
Neferti Tadiar

WMST BC3121 BLACK WOMEN IN AMERICA (4 points)
Kim F Hall

WMST BC3516 BLACK & WOMEN'S ART MOVEMENTS IN U.S. (4 points)
Lisa Collins

Crosslisted Courses

AFASC 83930 TOPICS: THE CULTURES OF HARLEM (4 points)
Farah Griffin

AFASC 3930 TOPICS IN THE BLACK EXPERIENCE: HISPANIOLA-DIVIDED ISLAND (4 points)
Steven Gregory

AFASC 3930 TOPICS IN THE BLACK EXPERIENCE: RELIGION & SEX-BLACK CULTURE (4 points)
Josef Sorett

AFASC 3930 TOPICS IN THE BLACK EXPERIENCE: NEW NEGRO MOVEMENT (4 points)

AFASC 3930 CARIBBEAN DIASPORA LITERATURE (4 points)
Patricia G Lespinasse

HIST W3514 TOPICS IN THE BLACK EXPERIENCE: IMMIGRANTS IN AMERICAN HISTORY & LIFE (3 points)
Mae M Ngai

HIST W3575 BLACK URBAN POLITICS (3 points)
Samuel K. Roberts

WMST 83243 MYSTICISM (3 points)
Patricia Dailey

WMST 83460 TOPICS: HISTORY-AMERICAN WOMEN & GENDER (3 points)
Alice Kessler-Harris

WMST 83462 MUSIC, GENDER, PERFORMANCE (3 points)
Ellen Gray

WMST 83930 GENDER HISTORY AND AMER FILM (4 points)
Hilary-Anne Hallett

WMST 84177 RELIGION, CASTE, CULTURE: INDIA (4 points)
Janaki Bakhle and E. Valentine Daniel

WMST 84913 VICO ON HISTORY (4 points)
Michal Shapira

WMST G6001 THEORY: PARADIGM FEMINIST SCHOLAR (3 points)
Alice Kessler-Harris and Carol Sanger

WMST 86600 THE SOCIAL LIFE OF DNA (3 points)
Alondra Nelson

WMST G8010 FEMINIST PERSPECTIVE ON TRAFFIC IN WOMEN (3 points)
Elizabeth Bernstein

WMST V1001 INTRO: WOMEN & GENDER STUDIES (3 points)
Rebecca M Young and Laura E Ciolkowski

WMST V3112 FEMINIST TEXTS II (4 points)
Lisa Tiersten

WMST V3813 COLLOQUIUM ON FEMINIST INQUIRY (4 points)
Mignonette Chiu

WMST W4301 20TH CENTURY JEWISH WOMEN WRITERS I (4 points)
Irena Klepfisz

WMST W4307 SEXUALITY AND THE LAW (4 points)
Paula Ettelbrick

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Fall 2010 Graduate/Undergraduate Courses