Courses

NOTE TO CSER STUDENTS: “Modes of Inquiry is offered only in the fall semester, please plan accordingly)

Fall 2014 Courses

CSER W3928 Sec 001
COLONIZATION/DECOLONIZATION
Brown, Christopher L.—T 9:00am - 10:50am – 420 Hamilton Hall
CSER W3928 is open only to CSER majors/concentrators. Others may be allowed to register with permission of the instructor.
This course explores the centrality of colonialism in the making of the modern world, emphasizing cross-cultural and social contact, exchange, and relations of power; dynamics of conquest and resistance; and discourses of civilization, empire, freedom, nationalism, and human rights, from 1500 to 2000. Topics include pre-modern empires; European exploration, contact, and conquest in the new world; Atlantic-world slavery and emancipation; European and Japanese colonialism in Asia, Africa, the Middle East. The course ends with a section on decolonization and post-colonialism in the period after World War II. Intensive reading and discussion of primary documents.

 

CSER W3924 Sec 001
LATIN AMERICAN & LATINO SOCIAL MOVEMENTS
Rockefeller, Stuart —T 11:00 - 12:50pm—420 Hamilton Hall
A wave of popular social movements has been transforming politics and social reality In Latin America. In the United States, Latinos/as are building on decades of organizing and demographic growth to claim a new public persona and challenge their marginal status. What are the significant areas of political action, and how can we understand them? What claims can those disenfranchised for reasons of race, class or national origin make on societies? We will discuss a number of important social movements throughout the region, while developing tools for understanding social movements and their possibilities.



CSER W3919 Sec 001
MODES OF INQUIRY
Fennell, Catherine­­—W 2:10pm-4:00pm—420 Hamilton Hall
*Major Requirement
Must register for Lab Session Mondays 2:10-3:10pm. This class, a combination of a seminar and a workshop, will prepare students to conduct, write up and present original research. It has several aims and goals. First, the course introduces students to a variety of ways of thinking about knowledge as well as to specific ways of knowing and making arguments key to humanistic and social science fields. Second, this seminar asks students to think critically about the approaches they employ in pursuing their research.   The course will culminate in a semester project, not a fully executed research project, but rather an 8-10 page proposal for research that will articulate a question, provide basic background on the context that this question is situated in, sketch preliminary directions and plot out a detailed methodological plan for answering this question. Students will be strongly encouraged to think of this proposal as related to their thesis or senior project. Over the course of the semester, students will also produce several short exercises to experiment with research techniques and genres of writing.

 

CSER W3921 Sec 001 – LAB
MODES OF INQUIRY LAB
Instructor TBD—M 2:10pm-4:00pm—Location TBD
Co-requisites: Modes of Inquiry (CSER W3919) this lab session meets 5 times a semester, for an hour.

 

CSER W3923 Sec 001
LATINO & ASIAN AMERICAN MEMOIR
Handal, Nathalie —M 2:10pm – 4:00pm—420 Hamilton Hall
In this class, we will explore Latino and Asian American memoir, focusing on themes of immigration and duality. How do we construct identity and homeland when we are ‘multiple’? How do we define ourselves and how do others define us? By reading some of the most challenging and exciting memoirs by Latino and Asian Americans, we will attempt to answer these questions and/or at least try to understand these transnational and multicultural experiences. This class combines the critical with the creative—students have to read and critic memoirs as well as write a final 10page nonfiction creative writing piece. *Students will also have the opportunity to speak to some Latino and Asian authors in class or via SKYPE. Students will be asked to prepare questions in advance for the author—whose work(s) we will have read and discussed. This usually arises interesting and thought-provoking conversations and debates. This 'Dialogue Series' within the class exposes students to a wide-range of voices and offers them a deeper understanding of the complexity of duality.

 

CSER W3926 Sec 001
LATIN MUSIC AND IDENTITY
Morales, Edward —T 2:10pm – 4:00pm—420 Hamilton Hall
Latin music has had a historically strained relationship with mainstream music tastes, exploding in occasional 'boom' periods, and receding into invisibility in others. What if this were true because it is a space for hybrid construction of identity that directly reflects a mixture of traditions across racial lines in Latin America. This course will investigate Latin music's transgression of binary views of race in Anglo-American society, even as it directly affects the development of pop music in America. From New Orleans jazz to Texas corridos, salsa, rock, and reggaeton, Latin music acts as both as a soundtrack and a structural blueprint for the 21st century's multicultural experiment. There will be a strong focus on studying Latin music's political economy, and investigating the story it tells about migration and globalization.

 

CSER W3905 Sec 001
ASIAN AMERICAN & PSYCHOLOGY OF RACE
Han, Shinhee —W 11:00am – 12:50pm—420 Hamilton Hall
This seminar provides an introduction to mental health issues for Asian Americans.  In particular, it focuses on the psychology of Asian Americans as racial/ethnic minorities in the United States by exploring a number of key concepts: immigration, racialization, prejudice, family, identity, pathology, and loss.  We will examine the development of identity in relation to self, family, college, and society.  Quantitative investigation, qualitative research, psychology theories of multiculturalism, and Asian American literature will also be integrated into the course.

 

CSER W3490 Sec 001
POST 9/11 IMMIGRATION POLICIES
OuYang, Elizabeth —R 11:00am – 12:50pm—420 Hamilton Hall
Since September 11, 2001, there has been an avalanche of immigration enforcement policies and initiatives proposed or implemented under the guise of national security. This course will analyze the domino effect of the Patriot Act, the Absconder Initiative, Special Registration, the Real I.D. Act, border security including the building of the 700 mile fence along the U.S./Mexico border, Secured Communities Act-that requires the cooperation of state and local authorities in immigration enforcement, the challenge to birthright citizenship, and now the congressional hearings on Islamic radicalization. Have these policies been effective in combating the war on terrorism and promoting national security? Who stands to benefit from these enforcement strategies? Do immigrant communities feel safer in the U.S.? How have states joined the federal bandwagon of immigration enforcement or created solutions to an inflexible, broken immigration system?

 

CSER W3963 Sec 001
NATIVE AMERICAN ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT
Press, Daniel —R 2:10pm – 4:00pm—420 Hamilton Hall
While casinos have pulled a number of small tribes out of poverty, the vast majority of Indians living on reservations continue to live at a level of poverty that is the equivalent of that found in third world countries or worse. For example, the life expectancy of a male on the Pine Ridge Reservation is lower than that of a male in most African countries. The course will explore the various approaches Indian tribes have or could take to promote the economies on their reservation, seeking to determine what elements produce a successful outcome. Areas to be explored include the role of tribal governments in economic development, land as an economic asset, gaming, energy and minerals development, finance, labor, individual entrepreneurship and the opportunity for multi- tribal companies. The course will begin with a review of basic theories of economic development and an exploration of lessons learned from economic development in underdeveloped nations.

 

CSER W3922 Sec 001
ASIAN AMERICAN CINEMA
Gamalinda, Eric —R 6:10pm – 8:00pm—420 Hamilton Hall
This seminar focuses on the critical analysis of Asian representation and participation in Hollywood by taking a look at how mainstream American cinema continues to essentialize the Asian and how Asian American filmmakers have responded to Orientalist stereotypes. We will analyze various issues confronting Asian American communities, including "yellowface"; white patriarchy; male and female stereotypes; the "model minority" myth; "Chinatowns" as spectacle; panethnicity; the changing political interpretations of the term "Asian American" throughout American history; gender and sexuality; and cultural hegemonies and privileging within the Asian community. Feature films and documentaries will be supplemented by a substantial amount of literature to provide a solid grounding on race theory and help students examine Asian [mis] representation in mainstream media; we will then view some examples of contemporary Asian American films and discuss how they challenge culturally embedded stereotypes.

 

CSER G9000
DISSERTATION DEVELOP SEMINAR: RACE, ETHNICITY, AND MIGRATION
Tran, Van C. —M 12:10pm – 2:00pm—420 Hamilton Hall
This course is designed to guide graduate students through the process of producing a high-quality dissertation and to provide an interdisciplinary space for the critical examination of race, ethnicity, and immigration, among other topics.

 

G4390 section 001
BORDERS AND BOUNDARIES
Lomnitz, Claudio—T 4:10pm-6:pm—Location TBD
This graduate seminar focuses on the relationship between international borders and social boundaries within national societies. It has as its premise a double paradox of contemporary life: the hardening of ethnic and racial boundaries at a time when goods and information flow across national borders quite freely; and the racialization of social relations at a time when racial theories lack scientific prestige, and racial categories have become conspicuously unstable. The seminar explores anthropological, historical, political and aesthetic dimensions of the relationship between national borders and social boundaries in a comparative context, and develops a conceptual foundation for analysis of the relationship between borders and boundaries. 

 

V3120 section 001
HISTORICAL RITUALS IN LATIN AMERICA
Lomnitz, Claudio—TR 10:10am-11:25am – Location TBD

Anthropologists and historians of literacy and communication have emphasized the reliance on multi-vocal imagery in the organization of social and political life in Latin America. Historically, the salient role of image and of ritual in political ritual was fed by the chasm between literate and illiterate segments of the population. During the 20th century, however, the rise of mass politics on one hand, and television and other visual media on the other, gave a new lease on the vibrant relevance of historical ritual and myth in local political life. This course explores the role of religious and secular ritual and myth in framing historical processes. It makes special emphasis on the use of Catholic ritual, imagery, and mythology in the European conquest and colonization of the continent, and in revolution, nation building, civic life, and sexual politics, since the 19th century.

 

V3821 section 001
NATIVE AMERICA
Audra Simpson - T 2:10pm-4:00pm 603 Hamilton Hall
This is an undergraduate seminar that takes up primary and secondary sources and reflections to a) provide students with an historical overview of Native American issues and representational practices b) provide students with an understanding of the ways in which land expropriation and concomitant military and legal struggle have formed the core of Native-State relations and are themselves central to American and Native American history and culture c) provide students with an understanding of Native representational practices, political subjectivity and aspiration.

 

W4321 section 001
HUMAN IDENTITY: DNA, RACE, AND IDENTITY
Marya Pollack and Robert E. Pollack – W 2:10-4:00pm - Location TBD
The course focuses on human identity, beginning with the individual and progressing to communal and global viewpoints using a framework of perspectives from biology, genetics, medicine, psychiatry, religion and the law.

 

FALL 2014 CROSS-REFERENCED COURSES

Comparative Literature and Society W4220 section 001
NARRATIVE, HEALTH & SOCIAL JUSTICE
Instructor: Sayantani Dasgupta; T 10:10am-12:00pm

Ecology, Evolution and Environmental Biology W4700 section 001
RACE: TANGLED HIST-BIOL CONCEPT; RACE
Instructor: Jill Shapiro; Monday W 4:10pm-5:25pm.

Women's Studies W3940 section 001
QUEER THEORIES & HISTORIES
Instructor: Elizabeth Povinelli; T 4:10pm-6:00pm

Philosophy V2110 section 001
PHILOSOPHY & FEMENISM
Instructor: Christina Mercer; TR 1:10pm-2:25pm

Spanish BC3980 section 001
LATIN AMER & LATINO ART ARCHIVES
Instructor: Joaquin Barriendos; TR 2:40pm-3:55pm

History BC3980 section 001
WORLD MIGRATION
Instructor: Jose Moya; TR 11:40am-12:55pm

History W3618 section 001
THE MODERN CARIBBEAN
Instructor: Natasha J. Lightfoot; MW 2:40pm-3:55pm

School of International & Public Affairs U0030
REGIONAL SPECIALIZATION; LATIN AMERICA
Instructor: Jose Moya

History BC4870 section 001
GENDER & MIGRATN:GLOBAL PERSPC; GENDER& MIGRATN:GLOBAL PERSPC
Instructor: Jose Moya; T 2:10pm-4:00pm.

English W3618 section 001
NATIVE AMERICAN LITERATURE
John Gamber; M 12:10pm-2:00pm 309 Hamilton Hall

Art History W4089 section 001
NATIVE AMERICAN ART
Elizabeth Hutchinson; TR 4:10pm-5:25pm 612 Schermerhorn Hall

Law L6330 section 001
NATIVE AMERICAN LAW; FEDERAL INDIAN LAW
Steven McSloy; M 6:20pm-8:10pm

Middle East W3920 section 001
CONTEMP CULTURE IN ARAB WORLD
Joseph Massad; W 4:10pm-6:00pm 402 Hamilton Hall

Middle East W3000 section 001
THEORY AND CULTURE
Gil Anidjar; MW 11:40am-12:55pm TBA

Spanish W3692 section 001
LABOR CULTURE 20THC LATIN AMER
Karen Benezra; MW 2:40pm-3:55pm 206 Casa Hispánica

African Studies O2005 section 001
CARIBBEAN CULTURE & SOCIETIES
Maja Horn; MW 2:40pm-3:55pm

Anthropology V1002 section 001
THE INTERPRETATION OF CULTURE
Sarah Muir; MW 11:40am-12:55pm

Africana Studies BC2005 section 001
CARIBBEAN CULTURE & SOCIETIES
Maja Horn; MW 2:40pm-3:55pm

English W3733 section 001
SEM IN AMERICAN LIT & CULTURE; DEWEY TO OBAMA
Nicole Wallack; T 11:00am-12:50pm 511 Kent Hall

Africana Studies BC2510 section 001
FOOD, ETHNICITY, GLOBALIZATION
Kim Hall; TR 2:40pm-3:55pm

First-Year Seminar BC1228 section 001
ETHNICITY & SOCIAL TRANSFRMTN
Margaret Ellsberg; MW 1:10pm-2:25pm

African-American Studies C3930 section 002
TOPICS IN THE BLACK EXPERIENCE HIP HOP & SOCIAL INEQUALITY
R. L'Heureux Lewis; W 11:00am-12:50pm

African-American Studies W3030 section 001
AFRICAN-AMERICAN MUSIC
Kevin Fellezs; TR 4:10pm-5:25pm

East Asian W3405 section 001
GENRE, GENDER, MOD JAPANESE LITERATURE
Tomi Suzuki; T 2:10pm-4pm

Latin American Civilization C1020 section 001
PRIM TEXTS OF LATIN AMER CIVILIZATION
Christia Mercer; TR 4:10pm-6:00pm

Philosophy V2110 section 001
PHILOSOPHY & FEMENISM
TR 1:10pm-2:25pm

Africana Studies BC2006 section 001
INTRODUCTION AFRICAN DIASPORA
Instructor: Kaiama Glover; TR 11:40am-12:55pm 325 Milbank Hall (Barnard)

Art History W3898 section 001
YORUBA AND THE DIASPORA
Instructor: Zoe Strother; M 4:10pm-6:00pm 930 Schermerhorn Hall

Art History BC3950 section 001
PHOTOGRAPHY & VIDEO IN ASIA
Instructor: Christopher Phillips; W 6:10pm-8:pm

International Affairs U6643 section 001
POLITICL ECONOMY OF SOUTH ASIA
Instructor: S. Akbar Zaidi; T 11:00am-12:50pm 402 International Affairs Building.

History W4235 section 001
CENT ASIA:IMP LEGACIES,NEW IMG
Instructor: Gulnar T. Kendirbai; W 11:00am-12:50pm

Middle East W3445 section 001
SOCIETIES/CULTRS: INDIAN OCEAN
Instructor: Mana Kia; MW 2:40pm-3:55pm

Sociology W3671 section 001
MEDIA, CULTURE & SOCIETY
Instructor: Sudhir A. Venkatesh; MW 2:40pm-3:55pm - 602 Hamilton Hall

Sociology W3930 section 001
IMMIGRATION & ETHNIC IN ISRAEL
Instructor: Yinon Cohen; M 10:10am-12:00pm - 201D Philosophy Hall

Sociology W3980 section 001
IMMIGRANT NEW YORK
Instructor: Van Tran; W 10:10am-12:00pm

Political Science W3921 section 009
AMERICAN POLITICS SEMINAR; POLIT-IMMIGRANTS/IMMIGRATION
Instructor: Rodolfo de la Garza; T 4:10pm-6:00pm


Spring 2015 Courses

CSER W1601
INTRO TO LATINO STUDIES
Instructor TBA – MW 1:10-2:25pm - Location TBA
This course provides an introductory, interdisciplinary discussion of the major issues surrounding this nation's Latino population. The focus is on social scientific perspectives utilized by scholars in the field of Latino Studies. Major demographic, social, economic, and political trends are discussed. Key topics covered in the course include: the evolution of Latino identity and ethnicity; the main Latino sub-populations in the United States; the formation of Latino communities in the United States; Latino immigration; issues of race and ethnicity within the Latino population; socioeconomic status and labor force participation of Latinos; Latino social movements; and the participation of Latinos in U.S. civil society.

CSER W3701
US-LATINO CULTURAL PRODUCTION
Edward Morales – R 2:10-4:00pm - Location TBA
The course will investigate the possibility that hybrid constructions of identity among Latinos in the U.S. are the principal driving force behind the cultural production of Latinos in literature and film. There will be readings on the linguistic implications of “Spanglish” and the construction of Latino racial identity, followed by examples of literature, film, music and other cultural production that provide evidence for bilingual/bicultural identity as a form of adaptation to the U.S. Examples will be drawn from different Latino ethnicities from the Caribbean, Mexico and the rest of Latin America.

CSER W3914
APPROACHES TO CONTEMPORARY NATIVE AMERICAN EDUCATION
Dan Press – R 2:10-4:00pm – Location TBA
The seminar will examine the very high dropout rate at high schools on Indian Reservations in this country and among indigenous populations in other countries and will explore possible approaches for addressing the problem. In seeking causes and solutions, the course will approach the dropout rate both as an education issue and as a microcosm of the larger issues confronting tribal governments and Native populations. The course will explore a broad range of possible explanations and solutions, looking both at issues in the education system and ones in the broader Native American society.

 

CSER W3931
HISPANIC NY AND LATINIZATION US
Claudio Remeseira — R 6:10pm-8:00pm, Location: 420 Hamilton

This seminar is a survey of the cultural heritage that sustains this diversity. We will explore the history and the demographic evolution of New York’s Latino and Latin American population, its racial, ethnic, and religious make-up, and its longstanding tradition in arts, music, and literature; in this last regard, the bibliography includes fiction, non-fiction, and poetry originally written both in English and Spanish (English translations will be provided for students who do not read Spanish). We will also analyze the connections between New York’s Hispanic cultural tradition and the broader US culture, as well as its place in the Spanish-American intellectual world. Finally, we will address some of the most pressing social issues related to the immigration flow from Latin America and the increasingly decisive role played by Latinos in New York politics.

CSER W3940
COMPARATIVE CONSTITUTIONAL CHALLENGES
Elizabeth OuYang  - R 11:00am-12:50pm 420 Hamilton Hall
This course will examine how the American legal system decided constitutional challenges affecting the empowerment of African, Latino and Asian American communities from the 19th century to the present. Topics include the role of the Supreme Court, the denial of citizenship and naturalization to slaves and immigrants, government sanctioned segregation, the internment of Japanese Americans during World War II, the prison industry, police brutality and racial profiling, post-9/11 immigration policies, and voting rights.

 

CSER W3970
ARABS IN LITERATURE AND FILM
Nathalie Handal – M 2:10-4:00pm 420 Hamilton Hall
This course explores contemporary Arab American and the Arab Diaspora culture and history through literature and film produced by writers and filmmakers of these communities. As a starting historical point, the course explores the idea of Arabness, and examines the Arab migration globally, in particular to the U.S., focusing on three periods, 1875-1945, 1945-early 1960s, and late 1960s-present. By reading and viewing the most exciting and best-known literary works and films produced by these writers and filmmakers, students will attain an awareness of the richness and complexity of these societies. Additionally, students will read historical and critical works to help them have a deeper understanding of theses creative works. Discussions revolve around styles and aesthetics as well as identity and cultural politics. Some of the writers the class will cover include, Wajdi Mouawad, Diana Abu Jaber,  Amin Maalouf, Tahar Ben Jelloun, Anthony Shadid, Hisham Matar and Adhaf Soueif.

CSER W3990
SENIOR PROJECT SEMINAR
Instructor TBA – M 9:00-10:50am 420 Hamilton Hall
*Must have first taken Modes of Inquiry
The final requirement for the major is completion of a Senior Essay, to be written in the spring of the senior year. Alternatively, students may fulfill this requirement by taking an additional seminar where a major paper is required or by writing an independent essay under the supervision of a faculty member. Seniors who wish to do a senior research project are required to take the Senior Project Colloquium in the fall of the senior year. Supporting coursework will include a one-point Fall term Practicum (a one-hour-and-fifteen-minute meeting per week) as well as a short exploratory writing exercise to prepare the groundwork for thesis writing in the spring. The Spring term, then, will consist of independent research and a three-point Senior Essays Colloquium and presentation in the end-of-year conference.

CSER W****
SUBCITIZENSHIP *NEW COURSE
Stuart Rockefeller – T 11:00am-12:50pm – Location TBA

CSER W4482
INDIGENOUS PEOPLES' RIGHTS: FROM LOCAL IDENTITIES TO THE GLOBAL INDIGENOUS MOVEMENT
Elsa Stamatopoulou – TR - 4:10pm-5:25pm – Location TBA
Indigenous Peoples, numbering more that 370 million in some 90 countries and about 5000 groups and representing a great part of the world’s human diversity and cultural heritage, continue to raise major controversies and to face threats to their physical and cultural existence. The main task of this interdisciplinary course is to explore the complex historic circumstances and political actions that gave rise to the international Indigenous movement through the human rights agenda and thus also produced a global Indigenous identity on all continents, two intertwined and deeply significant phenomena over the past fifty years.  We will analyze the achievements, challenges and potential of the dynamic interface between the Indigenous Peoples’ movement-one of the strongest social movements of our times- and the international community, especially the United Nations system.

CSER G9001
Dissertation Development Seminar
Instructor TBA — M 12:10pm-2:00pm – Location TBA
This class is designed with three objectives in mind. First to guide graduate students through the process of producing a high-quality dissertation. Second, to open up an interdisciplinary space for the critical examination of race, ethnicity, and indigeniety, among other topics. Third, to plan a conference linked to the participants’ projects for the spring semester of 2014.

CSER W3961
WEALTH & POVERTY IN THE US
Hidetaka Hirota -  R 9:00am-10:50AM – Location TBA
This seminar explores the problems of poverty in United States history based on intensive reading and class discussion. Already in the colonial period, poverty emerged as one of the central public concerns in American society. From the post-Revolutionary period to the late twentieth century, politicians, reformers, journalists, and the poor themselves continued to discuss the causes of and solutions to poverty as well as the best forms of charity that should be adopted in the United States. In poverty, as these peoples’ voices suggest, issues of fundamental importance in United States history, such as visions of American society, freedom, citizenship, governmental power, forces of capitalism, immigration, race and ethnicity, and gender converged. By examining the ideologies of poverty, debates over social welfare, the development of charitable institutions, and the lives of the poor, this course explores the historical significance of poverty in the United States. An exercise in interdisciplinary study, this course draws materials from a wide range of academic disciplines including history, Ethnic Studies, literary criticism, sociology, and law.

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Fall 2014 Graduate/Undergraduate Courses


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