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Curriculum

The MA in History and Literature is a one-year program, with courses from September to June, and an MA essay normally written during the summer following coursework. A total of 30 credits are necessary to earn the degree: 24 credits for coursework, and 6 credits for the MA essay. The degree is comprised of the following modules:

1. Two core courses taught at Reid Hall (Columbia’s Paris campus):

  • Introduction to History and Literature (3 pts). A historical and conceptual introduction to the relationship between history and literature.
  • Research Seminar (3 pts). Initiation to archival, bibliographical, and philological work, with hands-on sessions in libraries and archives, and designing of a research project.

2. Three specialized seminars taught at Reid Hall (3 pts each).

3. Three electives taught at EHESS and/or ENS (3 pts each).

4. An MA essay of no fewer than 50 pages (6 pts).

 

2015-2016 COURSES

1. COURSES OFFERED AT REID HALL:

HILI G4002 Introduction to History and Literature. 3 pts. Fall. Carol Gluck (bio). A historical and conceptual introduction to the relationship between history and literature.

HILI G8200 Narratives of World War II. 3 points. Fall. Carol Gluck (bio). An examination of literary, cinematic, and museal narratives of the Second World War produced in the decades since 1940 in France and other places. The analytic approach centers both on the historicity of, and the history in, the texts, with the goal of questioning the nature of narrative in different forms and practicing the blend of literary and historical approaches treated in the core course. Because the war remains so prominent an issue in culture, politics, and memory in France and elsewhere, the course presents an opportunity to explore the connections between history and literature in a field rich with great literary and cinematic texts and alive with dynamic historical debate.

HILI G8400 Research Seminar. 3 pts. Spring. Joseph Slaughter (bio). Initiation to archival, bibliographical, and philological work, with hands-on sessions in libraries and archives, and designing of a research project.

HILI G8xxx Plagiarism and Postcolonialism. 3 points. Spring. Joseph Slaughter (bio). This course examines practices of literary plagiarism, piracy, kidnapping, reproduction, impersonation and other disparaged textual activities in the context of (neo)imperial relations between literatures of (post)colonies and their metropolitan centers. If colonialism can be understood as, in part, an effort to reproduce some form of the culture of the imperial power in the colony, common accusations of plagiarism against (post)colonial writers would seem to reflect a fundamental anxiety about the cultural, social, and political projects of colonialism. Looking at multiple examples of “copy-writing,” this course moves beyond the “empire-writes-back” model of intertextuality that has characterized so many studies of the postcolonial novel, in which non-Western literature is read simply as a derivative response to the European canon. The course will study cases that involve “trafficking” in texts across linguistic and national boundaries to analyze historical, cultural, socio-economic, political and theoretical notions of authorship, originality, and (trans-)textuality as they intersect with colonialism and postcolonialism and as they are being negotiated in legal and literary conventions in the contemporary era of cultural-economic globalization.

HILI G8xxx Africa and France. 3 points. Summer. Gregory Mann (bio). This course endeavors to understand the development of the peculiar, intense, and historically conflictual relationship that exists between France and the sub-Saharan nation-states that are its former African colonies. Although the relationship between France and Africa is centuries old, having pre-dated the French Revolution and been forged partly in the trans-Atlantic trade in slaves, this course covers the period from France’s 19th century colonial conquest of Africa to the contemporary African diaspora in France. Historical episodes include the expansion of France’s imperial republic, the rise and evolution of anti-colonialism, struggles around decolonization, and French-African relations in the post-colonial world. This is not a survey course; nor is it a course in international relations. Its goal is to situate historically the development of a shared—if contested—French-African political language, via key texts and ideas.

2. SELECTED COURSES AT EHESS:

N.B.: This is not an exhaustive list, just a sample of offerings likely to be of interest to students in the HILI program. Many more options are available, and Associate Director of Studies Christine Valero advises students in the choice of courses depending on their research interests.

Les origines de la révolution française. Patrice Gueniffey

Les Usages sociaux de la littérature XIX ème – XX ème siècles.  Judith Lyon-Caen (bio)

Approches politiques du religieux.  Patrick Michel

Historiographie ancienne et moderne: la temporalisation du temps. François Hartog (bio)

Littérature et connaissance. Pascal Engel

L’homme du vertige, de Kafka à Michaux. Marielle Macé (bio)

Historiographie des Lumières. Antoine Lilti (bio) et Silvia Sebastiani (bio)

Histoire culturelle de l’Europe moderne. Antoine Lilti et Silvia Sebastiani

L’histoire en question. Roger Chartier (bio)

Ecrire l’histoire du XXème au XXIème siècle.  Marc-Oliver Baruch et Emmanuel Saint Fuscien

Anthropologie de l’art: réception et appropriation des œuvres. Brigitte Derlon

Travail intellectuel et écritures politiques à l’époque moderne. Christian Jouhaud (bio) et Dinah Ribard (bio)

L’histoire comparée et les migrations contemporaines. Nancy L. Green.

 

3. SELECTED COURSES AT ENS:

N.B.: This is not an exhaustive list, just a sample of offerings likely to be of interest to students in the HILI program. Many more options are available, and Associate Director of Studies Christine Valero advises students in the choice of courses depending on their research interests.

Questions de théorie littéraire: théories post-coloniales. Dominique Combe (bio)

Histoire de la critique et des théories littéraires. Dominique Combe

Littérature, langue, langage. Dominique Combe

Par delà le cadre national: connexions, circulations et interactions en histoire modern.  Rahul Markovits

Histoire et mémoire du nazisme.  Marie Benédicte Vincent

Construction de l'histoire littéraire. Marielle Macé (bio) et Michel Murat (bio)

Approches de la poésie contemporaine : le poème et le réel. Michel Murat

Géopolitique des avant-gardes, Beatrice Joyeux-Prunel

Traumatisme et écriture. Susannah Mary Ellis

Robinson Crusoe et ses réécritures. Marc Porée

Romantisme et révolution. Marc Porée

Hegel et la philosophie de l’histoire. Florian Nicomède

La philosophie entre la guerre et la paix: 1913-1945. Marc Crepon et Frederic Worms

Quand le cinéma pense la politique.  Marc Crepon et Françoise Zamour

 

 

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