Resources

While there is no single monograph on Chinese women in Shanghai in the 1930s, there are a variety of secondary and primary sources that can be read as background to Ling long. Shanghai studies have been leading the way in contemporary studies of Chinese cities, and the latest research on the city can be found in articles in journals such as the Journal of Asian Studies. Below is a list of secondary books and primary sources for further reading on Chinese women, the city, and culture during the Republican era (1911–49). For the non-Chinese reader, primary sources include works that are either mostly visual or have been translated into English.

Secondary Sources

History of Chinese Women

Women's Movement
Ono, Kazuko. Chinese Women in a Century of Revolution, 1850-1950. Ed. Joshua Fogel. Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1989.

Wang, Zheng. Women in the Chinese Enlightenment: Oral and Textual Histories. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1999.

Family
Glosser, Susan L. Chinese Visions of Family and State, 1915–1953. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2003.

Prostitution
Hershatter, Gail. Dangerous Pleasures: Prostitution and Modernity in Twentieth-Century Shanghai. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1997.

Urban History

Shanghai
Lu, Hanchao. Beyond the Neon Lights: Everyday Shanghai in the Early Twentieth Century. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1999.

Wakeman, Frederic, Jr. Policing Shanghai 1927–1937. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1995.

Goodman, Bryna. Native Place, City, and Nation: Regional Networks and Identities in Shanghai, 1853–1937. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1995.

Other Chinese Cities
Esherick, Joseph, ed. Remaking the Chinese City: Modernity and National Identity, 1900–1950. Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press, 1999.

Rogaski, Ruth. Hygienic Modernity: Meanings of Health and Disease in Treaty-Port China. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2004.

Tsin, Michael. Nation, Governance, and Modernity in China: Canton, 1900–1927. Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1999.

Consumption in the City
Cochran, Sherman, ed. Inventing Nanjing Road: Commercial Culture in Shanghai, 1900–1945. Cornell East Asia Series 103. Ithaca: Cornell University East Asia Program, 1999.

Gerth, Karl. China Made: Consumer Culture and the Creation of the Nation. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 2003.

Culture

Literature
Lee, Leo Ou-fan. Shanghai Modern: The Flowering of a New Urban Culture in China 1930–1945. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1999.

Shih, Shu-mei. The Lure of the Modern: Writing Modernism in Semicolonial China, 1917–1937. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2004.

Xu, Yinong. The Chinese City in Space and Time: The Development of Urban Form in Suzhou. Honolulu: University of Hawaii, 2000.

Popular Culture
Jones, Andrew. Yellow Music: Media Culture and Colonial Modernity in the Chinese Jazz Age. Durham, N.C.: Duke University Press, 2001.

Zhang, Yingjin, ed. Cinema and Urban Culture in Shanghai, 1922–1943. Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1999.

Primary Sources

Literature
Dun, Mao. Midnight. Beijing: Foreign Language Press, 1957.

—. Rainbow. Voices from Asia 4. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1992.

Zhang, Ailing (Chang, Eileen). Rouge of the North. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1998.

—. The Rice-Sprout Song: A Novel of Modern China. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1998.

Zhang, Henshui. Shanghai Express: A Thirties Novel. Trans. William A. Lyell. Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press, 1997.

Film
San ge modeng nuxing (Three Modern Women), 1933, starring Ruan Lingyu

Xin nu xing (New Woman), 1934, starring Ruan Lingyu

Shen nu (Goddess), 1934, starring Ruan Lingyu

Zimei hua (Twin Sisters), 1934, starring Hu Die

Ma lu tian shi (Street Angel), 1937

Other Periodical Literature
Liang you. Shanghai, 1935–40.
Pictorial magazine. Mostly photographs with captions in Chinese and English.

Shen bao. Shanghai, 1872–1949.
Shanghai's most popular daily newspaper. In Chinese.

North China Daily News. Shanghai, 1850–1951.
The first English-language newspaper in China.

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