Fall 2013 MESAAS Courses


This information is subject to change. For the most up-to-date information, please visit the Registrar's Directory of Classes.

Note that enrollment in language courses is determined in some cases by placement examinations. See Languages for details, and consult the pages on specific languages, such as Arabic for further information. Language courses must be taken for a letter grade. Pass/Fail or Registration credit (R) is not permitted.

For course requirements, see the pages on the Graduate and Undergraduate programs.

Course Numbering System

  • 1000 and 2000: Undergraduate-level courses. Introductory and intermediate language courses are numbered at the 1000 level.
  • 3000: Advanced undergraduate courses.
  • 4000: Courses for graduate students and, in some cases, advanced undergraduates.
  • 6000 and higher: Graduate-level courses; some 8000- and 9000-level courses are reserved for Ph.D. students only.

The following course designators appear in abbreviated form:

  • MDES (Designator for all MESAAS courses that are not cross listed)
  • AHUM (Asian Humanities)
  • ASCM (Asian Civilizations-Middle East)
  • CLME (Comparative Literature-Middle East)
  • HSME (History-Middle East)
  • ANME (Anthropology of Middle East)
TOPICS IN ASIAN CIVILIZATION: MIDDLE EAST & INDIA ASCM V2001
Professor Hossein Kamaly  

Interdisciplinary and topical approach to major issues and phases of Asian civilizations and their role in the contemporary world.

INTRO TO ISLAMIC CIVILIZATION ASCM V2003
Professor George Saliba  

Islamic civilization and its characteristic political, social, and religious institutions and intellectual traditions from its pre-Islamic Arabian setting to the present. Lecture and recitation. Islamic civilization and its characteristic political, social, and religious institutions and intellectual traditions.

Modern South Asia: Introduction to Bollywood
MDES W2640
Prof. Anuja Jain
 

This course will provide a historical and thematic introduction to Indian cinema, with a particular focus on the theme of city in Hindi language Indian popular cinema, which has recently become known more commonly as ?Bollywood.? Since the inception of the medium, cinema has proved to have a special capacity to understand and respond to urbanism and modernity. Bringing together a range of cinematic practices and urban experiences, we will study how the imagined city becomes the site of the rhythms and movements of modern South Asia - from a space of possibility (conjugal relations and social mobility), to site of urban poverty, religious and sectarian violence, caste and gender politics, class ghettoization, and migration.

THEORY & CULTURE MDES W3000
Professor Hamid Dabashi  

Required of all majors. Enrollment limited to 35 students. Critical introduction to theories of culture as they are related to the Middle East and South Asia. Enables students to articulate their emerging knowledge of these two regions and cultures in a theoretically informed language. Required of all majors. Introduces theories of culture particularly related to the Middle East and South Asia. Theoretical debates on the nature and function of culture as a symbolic reading of human collectivities. Examines critical cultural studies of the Middle East and South Asia. Enables students to articulate their emerging knowledge of Middle East and Asian cultures in a theoretically informed language.

THE COLONIAL ENCOUNTER MDES W3250
Professor Ahmad Sadiya  

The course explores the relationships between the colonial powers and the territories and peoples they ruled. It is based on the assumption that the colonial experience has had an enduring and multifaceted impact on the social, cultural and political process in both the colonial and the colonized societies. The course is organized around the key themes of the colonial encounter, rather than the history of colonialism in various regions: it considers colonial ideologies of race and sexuality, the formation of identities in the encounter, the dynamics of cultural borrowing, and the emergence of new forms of social struggle and collective memory that this shared but unequal history has generated. Although the course will focus on the 19th and the 20th centuries, the heydays of colonialism and the struggle for decolonization, questions pertaining to the post-colonial condition, including neocolonialism, will be addressed.

RETHINKING MIDDLE EAST POLITICS MDES W3260
Professor Timothy Mitchell  

This course examines a set of questions that have shaped the study of the politics of the modern Middle East. The topics covered in the course include: the kinds of modern state that emerged in the Middle East and the ways its forms of power and authority were shaped; the birth of economic development as a way of describing the function and measuring the success of the state, and the changing metrics of this success; the influence of oil on the politics of the region; the nature and role of Islamic political movements; the transformation of the countryside and the city and the role of rural populations and of urban protest in modern politics; and the politics of armed force and political violence in the region, and the ways in which this has been understood.

MAJOR TEXTS AHUM V3399
Professor Nanor Kebranian  

Readings in translation and discussion of texts of Middle Eastern and Indian origin. The Qur'an, Islamic philosophy, Sufi poetry, the Upanishads, Buddhist sutras, the Bhagavad Gita, Indian epics and drama, and Gandhi's Autobiography.

SOCIETIES & CULTURES ACROSS THE INDIAN OCEAN MDES W3445
Professor Mana Kia  

The course is designed to introduce the Indian ocean as a region linking the Middle East, East Africa, South and Southeast Asia. With a focus on both continuities and rupture, we study select cultures and societies brought into contact through interregional migration and travel across the Indian Ocean over a broad arc of history. Different types of people - nobles, merchants, soldiers, statesmen, sailors, scholars, slaves - experienced mobility in different ways. How did different groups of people represent such mobilities? What kinds of cooperation, accommodation or conflict did different Indian Ocean encounters engender? Using an array of different primary sources, we look at particular case studies and their broader social and cultural contexts.

HISTORY OF SOUTH ASIA I HSME W3810
Professor Manan Ahmed  

There are three broad objectives to the course: First, to gain a fuller comprehension of the political, social, and cultural history of the sub-continent (from roughly the fifth to through the 16th century CE). Second, to delve into primary source materials (epigraphic, monumental, textual, or visual) pertaining to crucial themes and sites from this history; in order to gain an appreciation of the transculturation processes through which varied communities organized themselves. Third, to familiarize oneself with historiographical trends in the study of South Asia.

A HISTORY OF AFRICAN CITIES MDES W3915
Professor Mamadou Diouf  

The seminar is an interdisciplinary exploration of the history of African cities, examining very closely three periods: the pre-colonial, the colonial, and the postcolonial. Its focus is the intersection of geography, politics, and society. Using colonialism, empire, and globalization as key analytical frames of urban processes, it pays special attention to the historical forms of urban cultures, politics, economies, leisure and representations which are shaped by – and are shaping – the various ways in which urban dwellers experience life in their cities.

CONTEMPORARY CULTURE IN THE ARAB WORLD MDES W3920
Professor Joseph A Massad  

This seminar, designed for seniors, aims to acquaint students with the notion and theoretical understanding of culture and to introduce them to a critical method by which they can study and appreciate contemporary culture in the Arab World.

CENTRAL QUESTIONS IN ISLAMIC LAW MDES W3923
Professor Wael Hallaq  

Through detailed discussions of certain landmarks in Islamic legal history (e.g., origins; early formation; sources of law; intellectual make-up; the workings of court; legal change; women in the law; legal effects of colonialism; modernity and legal reform, etc.), the course aims at providing an introductory but integrated view of Islamic law, a definition, so to speak, of what it was/is.

HONORS THESIS SEMINAR MDES W3960
Professor Kai Kresse  

This is a one-year course that begins in the fall semester (1 point) and continues through the spring semester (3 points). Only students who have completed both semesters will receive the full 4 points of credit. Prerequisites: Minimum GPA of 3.5 in MESAAS courses. The MESAAS honors seminar offers students the opportunity to undertake a sustained research project under close faculty supervision. The Director of Undergraduate Studies(DUS) advises on general issues of project design, format, approach, general research methodologies, and timetable. In addition, students work with an individual advisor who has expertise in the area of the thesis and can advise on the specifics of method and content. The thesis will be jointly evaluated by the adviser, the DUS, and the honors thesis TA. The DUS will lead students through a variety of exercises that are directly geared to facilitating the thesis. Students build their research, interpretive, and writing skills; discuss methodological approaches; write an annotated bibliography; learn to give constructive feedback to peers and respond to feedback effectively. The final product is a polished research paper in the range of 40-60 pages.

THEORY & METHODS MDES G4000
Professor Sudipta Kaviraj  

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission. Explores recent studies on the Middle East with explicitly stated theoretical orientations that may be grouped under three broad catagories of nationalism, discipline, and power and resistance. Methodologies as diverse as comparative method, post-structuralism, narrative, and ethnography are not investigated in the abstract but in the context of rich empirical case studies.

CRISIS WORKS MDES W4055
Professor Nikolas Kosmatopoulos  

This class will critically explore contemporary questions and contexts of crisis. It will approach crisis in multiple ways: as a modern category of thought, as an emerging domain of global policy-making, as a techno-political problem to be governed and as an ethnographic challenge. In general, the class will address how crisis works: how has the concept been universalized and how it operates today in distinctive fields and global concerns, such a the economy, the state, violence and conflict, humanitarianism and security, but also in the case of upheavals such as the recent rebellions in the Arab World. It will further investigate how experts, institutions and governments mobilize the concept, what are the effects of its mobilization on populations and spaces, and to what extent it might enable or disable diverse forms of knowledge/power, inequality and critique.

PALESTINIANS-ISRAEL 1948-2013 MDES G4256
Professor Ahmad Sadiya  

The course examines the lives of the Palestinians who became citizens of Israel, analyzing their status in Israeli society as well as their conceptualization in Israeli literature, social sciences, and textbooks.  We will study the historical, sociological, and anthropological scholarship, as well as the literary representations of the dialectical processes that shaped their situation: the destruction of the Palestinian landscape and the creation of a new Israeli society, landscape and maps. Furthermore, the course will trace the development of this minority from a marginalized group that was placed under tight surveillance and political control in the first two decades post-1948 to a coherent socio-political force that is now challenging the state’s foundation. The course will therefore trace the way in which this minority rebuilt itself as a moral and national collectivity following the disintegration of Palestinian society as a result of the 1948 war and explores the socio-political and cultural milieu in which this revival has taken place.  

RETHINKING MIDDLE EAST POLITCS MDES W4260
Professor Timothy Mitchell  

This course examines a set of questions that have shaped the study of the politics of the modern Middle East. The topics covered in the course include: the kinds of modern state that emerged in the Middle East and the ways its forms of power and authority were shaped; the birth of economic development as a way of describing the function and measuring the success of the state, and the changing metrics of this success; the influence of oil on the politics of the region; the nature and role of Islamic political movements; the transformation of the countryside and the city and the role of rural populations and of urban protest in modern politics; and the politics of armed force and political violence in the region, and the ways in which this has been understood.

POPULAR ISLAM CLME G4261
Professor Muhsin al-Musawi  

This course questions the whole idea of Arab modernity which is usually associated with the nahda or Arab awakening at the turn of the nineteenth century. Through close analysis of texts, poetry, narrative, travelogue and memoirs, it argues that the bane of modernity is its subordination to a Western ideal that minimizes or even negates its engagement with Islamic and Arab tradition. The nation state through codification processes and as led by the intelligentsia forged a social program that is no less divested of tradition and rural culture. Only after 1967, the unsettling experience of total bankruptcy, that intellectuals question the dichotomies of science versus religion and the myth of progress versus tradition. New writings take to the street where they find substance and faith that has been ignored for long under cultural dependency. These works receive due attention in relation to theoretical studies that increase readers' critical insight.

THE ARMENIAN GENOCIDE & THE HOLOCAUST: MEMORY & REPRESENTATION MDES G4326
Professor Peter Balakian  

This course is an investigation of the impact of genocide on the self and the imagination’s representations in literature, film, and video testimony; primary texts will include poetry, memoir, video testimony, film, and visual art. Methodology will involve literary criticism and theoretical works in the study of trauma, literary theory, and testimony. The course will concern itself with the aftermath of two twentieth century genocides—that of the Armenians in Turkey during World War I and of the Jews in Europe during World War II—both seminal events of the twentieth century that, in various ways, became models for ensuing genocides. Students will be permitted to write about other post-genocidal texts with the instructor’s permission.

POLITICS IN INDIA MDES G4601
Professor Sudipta Kaviraj  

This course will combine study of long-term historical sociology with more short term understanding of policies and their possible effects. Though its main purpose will be to provide students with an understanding of politics after independence, it will argue, methodologically, that this understanding should be based on a study of historical sociology plotting long-term shifts in the structure of social power.

19TH CENTURY INDIAN MUSLIMS HSME G4643
Professor S. Akbar Zaidi  

This is an advanced undergraduate/graduate history seminar course over thirteen weeks, designed to introduce upper level students to the study of Muslims in colonial India in the nineteenth century. Although dealing with this period, the main focus of this course will be on social, religious and political developments, inspired by, and affecting, India's Muslims in the second half of the century.

MODERN & MEDIEVAL ISLAMIC POLITICAL THOUGHT CLME G4764
Professor Hamid Dabashi  

This course is a comparative examination of modern and medieval Islamic political thoughts. The seminar begins with the roots of Islamic political thoughts in early Islamic history, as well as in the Qur'anic revelations and Prophetic Hadith traditions. We will then divide the course into two major components: medieval and modern, with the rise of European colonialism in the late 18th and early 19th century as the principal catalyst of groundbreaking changes in Islamic political thoughts.

READINGS IN CLASSICAL ARABIC MDES G6210
Professor George Saliba  

Readings and analysis of texts, with discussion of the nature and development of the genres within the context of Islamic thought. One genre covered each term.

ISLAMIC LAW THROUGH TEXTS MDES G6232
Professor Wael Hallaq  

This graduate seminar is conducted entirely in Arabic sources. We will read various passages from the Quran in order to highlight the Quran’s moral imperatives about living in nature as well as about the generation of wealth and its distribution within the social order. We will then move on to examine the genre of fiqh (substantive law) with regard to the same themes, examining the moral structures of society in terms of the ethic of spending. Themes such as making money, building capital, charity, welfare, etc. will be examined in depth as constituting a system of checks-and-balances, through close readings of the concepts of kasb, zakat, sadaqa, waqf, etc. PROFICIENCY IN ARABIC REQUIRED.

THE MODERN STATE & THE COLONIAL SUBJECT ANME G6406
Professor Mahmood Mamdani  

This seminar on the development of legal thought on the colonial subject will read and discuss texts focusing on three different historical periods: the 16th and 17th Century conquest of native peoples in the New World; the subjugation of British India (the Dutch East Indies and the Malay states) before and after the 1857 Uprising; and the conquest of southern and tropical Africa in the 19th and 20th Centuries.

PSYCHOANALYSIS, IDENTITY, & CULTURE MDES G8206
Professor Joseph A Massad  

This graduate seminar aims to introduce students to Freud and Freudian Psychoanalysis and the integration of both in critical theory. The main question the seminar aims to study is the formation of identity in psychoanalysis and how it relates to civilization and culture more generally, whether in its gender, sexual, or national configurations. The influence of Social Darwinism and Developmentalism more generally on Freudian psychoanalysis will be discussed as well as the importance of related temporal concepts deployed in psychoanalysis' insistence on the divide between primitivism and culture. We will discuss a number of major scholarly works engaging Freud's theories on all these questions and their relevance to social and cultural analysis.

 

LANGUAGE COURSES


Middle East Languages


Arabic

ARABIC FOR HERITAGE SPEAKERS I MDES W1208
Youssef Nouhi Registrar's Information
FIRST YEAR ARABIC I MDES W1210
Youssef Nouhi Registrar's Information
Reem Faraj Registrar's Information
Tarik Belhoussein Registrar's Information
Tarik Belhoussein Registrar's Information
May Ahmar Registrar's Information

An introduction to the language of classical and modern Arabic literature.

FIRST YEAR ARABIC II MDES W1211
Ouijdane Absi Registrar's Information

An introduction to the language of classical and modern Arabic literature.

SECOND YEAR ARABIC I MDES W1214
May Ahmar Registrar's Information
Rym Bettaieb Registrar's Information
Tarik Belhoussein Registrar's Information

Prerequisite: MDES W1210-W1211 or the equivalent. A continuation of the study of the language of contemporary writing.

SECOND YEAR ARABIC II MDES W1215
Reem Faraj Registrar's Information

Prerequisite: MDES W1210-W1211 or the equivalent. A continuation of the study of the language of contemporary writing.

THIRD YEAR ARABIC I MDES W4210
Ouijdane Absi Registrar's Information
Rym Bettaieb Registrar's Information
4TH YEAR ARABIC I: MODERN PROSE MDES W4212
Taoufik Ben-Amor Registrar's Information
ADVANCED ARABIC GRAMMAR REVIEW MDES W4216
Taoufik Ben-Amor Registrar's Information

Hebrew

HEBREW FOR HERITAGE SPEAKERS I MDES W1517
Nehama R. Bersohn Registrar's Information

Hebrew for Heritage Speakers I forms part of a year-long sequence with Hebrew for Heritage Speakers II. The course is intended for those who have developed basic speaking and listening skills through exposure to Hebrew at home or in day-school programs but do not use Hebrew as their dominant language and have not reached the level required for exemption from the Columbia language requirement. Heritage speakers differ in the degree of their fluency, but their vocabulary is often limited to topics in daily life and many lack skills in reading and writing to match their ability to converse. The course focuses on grammar and vocabulary enrichment, exposing students to a variety of cultural and social topics in daily life and beyond. By the end of the semester students are able to read and discuss simple texts and write about a variety of topics. Successful completion of the year-long sequence prepares students to enroll in third-year modern Hebrew.

1ST YEAR MODERN HEBREW: ELEMENTARY I MDES W1510
Rina Kreitman Registrar's Information
Illan Gonen Registrar's Information

This is an introductory course for which no prior knowledge is required. Equal emphasis is given to listening, speaking, reading, writing and grammar. Daily homework includes grammar exercises, short answers, reading, or paragraph writing. Frequent vocabulary and grammar quizzes.

2ND YEAR MODERN HEBREW: INTERMEDIATE I MDES W1512
Rina Kreitman Registrar's Information
Illan Gonen Registrar's Information

Prerequisites: Prerequisite: MDES W1511 or the equivalent. Equal emphasis is given to listening, speaking, reading and writing. Regular categories of the Hebrew verb, prepositions, and basic syntax are taught systematically. Vocabulary building. Daily homework includes grammar exercises, short answers, reading, or short compositions. Frequent vocabulary and grammar quizzes.

3RD YEAR MODERN HEBREW I MDES W4510
Nehama R. Bersohn Registrar's Information

Prerequisites: Hebrew W1513 or W1515 or the instructor's permission. Students are expected to have basic familiarity with regular and irregular verbs in five categories of the Hebrew verb system: Pa'al, Pi'el, Hif'il, Hitpa'el and Nif'al. The course focuses on vocabulary building and on development of reading skills, using adapted literary and journalistic texts with and without vowels. Verb categories of Pu'al and Huf'al are taught systematically. Other verb forms are reviewed in context. A weekly hour is devoted to practice in conversation. Daily homework includes reading, short answers, compositions, listening to web-casts, and giving short oral presentations via voice e-mail. Frequent vocabulary quizzes.


Persian

ELEMENTARY PERSIAN I MDES W1710
Ghazzal Dabiri Registrar's Information
TBA Registrar's Information

An introduction to the spoken and written language of contemporary Iran.

INTERMEDIATE PERSIAN I MDES W1712
Ghazzal Dabiri Registrar's Information

Prerequisite: MDES W1710-W1711 or the equivalent. A general review of the essentials of grammar; practice in spoken and written Persian; Arabic elements in Persian; selected readings emphasizing Iranian life and culture; materials from Tajikistan and Afghanistan, Indari.

ADVANCED PERSIAN I MDES W4710
Ghazzal Dabiri Registrar's Information

Turkish

ELEMENTARY MODERN TURKISH I MDES W1910
Zuleyha Colak Registrar's Information
INTERMEDIATE MODERN TURKISH I MDES W1912
Ihsan Colak Registrar's Information
ADVANCED TURKISH I MDES W4910
Ihsan Colak Registrar's Information
BEGINNING OTTOMAN TURKISH I MDES W4921
Ihsan Colak Registrar's Information
INTERMEDIATE OTTOMAN TURKISH I MDES W4926
Zuleyha Colak Registrar's Information

Armenian

ELEMENTARY ARMENIAN I MDES W1310
Charry Karamanoukian Registrar's Information
INTERMEDIATE ARMENIAN I MDES W1312
Charry Karamanoukian Registrar's Information

Prerequisites: MDES W1310-W1311 or the equivalent. A continuation of the study of reading, writing and speaking of Armenian.


South Asian Languages


Sanskrit

ELEMENTARY SANSKRIT I MDES W1401
Guy Leavitt Registrar's Information

An introduction to classical Sanskrit. Grammar and reading of texts.

INTERMEDIATE SANSKRIT I MDES W1404
Guy Leavitt Registrar's Information

Reading and grammatical analysis of a literary text, chosen from the dramatic and narrative tradition.

ADVANCED SANSKRIT I MDES W4810
Guy Leavitt Registrar's Information

Prerequisites: Two years of Sanskrit or instructor permission The two levels of advanced Sanskrit are typically given in alternate years. In 2005-06, kavya and alankarasastra will be offered; in 2006-07, mimamsa and nyaya. Additional courses, including Introduction to Panini and Introduction to the Literary Prakrits, are also available periodically. Final examinations will be required of all students in the first year of Advanced Sanskrit. In the second year, students are required to prepare a research project in lieu of the examination. This may be a research paper, a book or articles review, a bibliographical study, a translation, or whatever will advance the student’s research capabilities.


Hindi-Urdu

HINDI FOR HERITAGE SPEAKERS I MDES W1608
Rakesh Ranjan Registrar's Information

This is an accelerated course for students of South Asian origin who already possess a knowledge of basic vocabulary and limited speaking and listening skills in Hindi. They may not have sufficient skills in reading and writing but are able to converse on familiar topics such as: self, family, likes, dislikes and immediate surroundings. This course will focus on developing knowledge of the basic grammar of Hindi and vocabulary enrichment by exposing students to a variety of cultural and social topics related to aspects of daily life; and formal and informal registers. Students will be able to read and discuss simple texts and write about a variety of everyday topics by the end of the semester.

URDU FOR HERITAGE SPEAKERS I MDES W1614
Aftab Ahmad Registrar's Information

Prerequisites: A knowledge of basic vocabulary and limited speaking and listening skills in Urdu. An accelerated course for students of South Asian origin who already possess a knowledge of basic vocabulary and limited speaking and listening skills in Urdu.

ELEMENTARY HINDI-URDU I MDES W1610
Rakesh Ranjan Registrar's Information
Dalpat Rajpurohit Registrar's Information
TBA Registrar's Information

An introduction to the most widely spoken language of South Asia. Along with an understanding of the grammar, the course offers practice in listening and speaking. The Hindi (Devanagari) script is used for reading and writing.

INTERMEDIATE HINDI-URDU I MDES W1612
Dalpat Rajpurohit Registrar's Information
Aftab Ahmad Registrar's Information

Prerequisites: MDES W1610-W1611 or the instructor's permission. Continuing practice in listening, speaking, and grammatical understanding. Along with the Hindi (Devanagari) script, the Urdu (Perso-Arabic) script is taught in the class; both scripts are used for reading and writing.

READINGS IN HINDI LITERATURE I MDES W4610
Dalpat Rajpurohit Registrar's Information

Prerequisites: MDES W1613 or the instructor's permission. Conducted largely in Hindi. Includes reading and discussion of selected literary, social science, historical, and/or journalistic texts. Since the content changes each term, the course may be repeated for credit.

READINGS IN URDU LITERATURE I MDES W4635
Aftab Ahmad Registrar's Information

Prerequisites: MDES W1613 or the instructor's permission. Conducted largely in Urdu. Includes reading and discussion of selected literary, social science, historical, and/or journalistic texts. Since the content changes each term, the course may be repeated for credit.


Tamil

ELEMENTARY TAMIL I MDES W1101
D. Samuel Sudanandha Registrar's Information

Introduces students to the basic grammatical and syntactical skills required to function adequately in a Tamil-speaking environment. Of particular interest to students planning to conduct scholarly research or fieldwork in that region of the world. Introduces students to the rich culture of the Indian subcontinent where Tamil is spoken.

INTERMEDIATE TAMIL I MDES W1201
D. Samuel Sudanandha Registrar's Information

Prerequisites: MDES W1101-W1102 or the instructor's permission. Further develops students' written and oral proficiency in order to allow them to function adequately in a Tamil-speaking environment. Of particular interest to students planning to conduct scholarly research or fieldwork in a Tamil-speaking context. Develops the students' appreciation for the rich culture of the Indian subcontinent where Tamil is spoken.

ADVANCED TAMIL I MDES W4118
D. Samuel Sudanandha Registrar's Information

 



African Languages


Pulaar

ELEMENTARY PULAAR I PULAAR W1101
Mariame Sy Registrar's Information

Introduction to the basic grammatical structures of Pulaar, a major language of West Africa spoken in the Senegal River valley area.

Swahili

ELEMENTARY SWAHILI I SWHL W1101
Abdul Nanji Registrar's Information
Jane N. Clayton Registrar's Information

Essentials of grammar, basic vocabulary, practice in speaking and reading Swahili the most widely used indigenous language of East Africa.

INTERMEDIATE SWAHILI I SWHL W1201
Abdul Nanji Registrar's Information

Prerequisites: SWHL 1101-1102 or instructor's permission A review of the essentials of Swahili grammar; detailed analysis of Swahili texts; practice in conversation.

ADVANCED SWAHILI I SWHL W3335
Abdul Nanji Registrar's Information

Wolof

ELEMENTARY WOLOF I WOLOF W1101
Mariame Sy Registrar's Information

Introduction to the basic grammatical structures of Wolof, a major language of West Africa spoken primarily in Senegal and Gambia.

INTERMEDIATE WOLOF I WOLOF W1201
Mariame Sy Registrar's Information

Prerequisites: WLOF W1101-W1102 or the instructor's permission. Further develop a student's knowledge of Wolof, a major language of West Africa spoken primarily in Senegal and Gambia.

ADVANCED WOLOF I WOLOF W3331
Mariame Sy Registrar's Information

Zulu

ELEMENTARY ZULU I ZULU W1101
John Zuzo Registrar's Information

Introduces students to the basic structures of Zulu, a Bantu language spoken in South Africa, especially in the Zululand area of Kwa Zulu/Natal province

INTERMEDIATE ZULU I ZULU W1201
John Zuzo Registrar's Information

Prerequisites: ZULU W1201-W1202 or the instructor's permission. Provides students with an in-depth review of the essentials of the Zulu grammar. Students are also able to practice their language skills in conversation.