Spring 2013 MESAAS Courses


This information is subject to change. For the most up-to-date information, please visit the Registrar's Directory of Classes.

Note that enrollment in language courses is determined in some cases by placement examinations. See Languages for details, and consult the pages on specific languages, such as Arabic for further information. Language courses must be taken for a letter grade. Pass/Fail or Registration credit (R) is not permitted.

For course requirements, see the pages on the Graduate and Undergraduate programs.

Course Numbering System

  • 1000 and 2000: Undergraduate-level courses. Introductory and intermediate language courses are numbered at the 1000 level.
  • 3000: Advanced undergraduate courses.
  • 4000: Courses for graduate students and, in some cases, advanced undergraduates.
  • 6000 and higher: Graduate-level courses; some 8000- and 9000-level courses are reserved for Ph.D. students only.

The following course designators appear in abbreviated form:

  • MDES (Designator for all MESAAS courses that are not cross listed)
  • AHUM (Asian Humanities)
  • ASCM (Asian Civilizations-Middle East)
  • CLME (Comparative Literature-Middle East)
  • HSME (History-Middle East)
  • ANME (Anthropology of Middle East)
CONTEMPORARY ISLAMIC CIVILIZATION ASCM V2008
Professor George Saliba  

The contemporary Islamic world studied through freshly translated texts; recorded interviews with religious, political, and intellectual leaders; and films highlighting the main artistic and cultural currents. Topics include religion and society, religion and politics, issues of development, theories of government, gender issues, East-West confrontation, theatre, arts, films, poetry, music, and the short novel. Lecture and recitation. No previous study of Islam is required

MODERN SOUTH ASIA: INTRO TO BOLLYWOOD MDES W2640
Professor Anuja Jain  

India is the world's largest film-producing nation, releasing over 900 films every year. Indian film industry remains an exceptional industry, holding its own against Hollywood's expansion into markets like India. This course provides a historical and thematic introduction to different forms of Indian cinema, with a particular focus on Bombay cinema or Hindi language popular Indian cinema. Starting with late colonization in the 1940s, and moving chronologically through the decades to the present, we will explore various genres within Indian cinema, and examine the way in which Indian cinema addresses the socio-political issues of caste, class, religion, and gender, as it engages with the events and experiences that shape the cultural, social, and political realities of modern South Asia.

PALESTINIAN-ISRAELI POLITICS & SOCIETY MDES W3042
Professor Joseph A. Massad  

The History of the Jewish Enlightenment (Haskala) in 19th century Europe and the development of Zionism through the current "peace process" between the state of Israel and the Arab states and the Palestinian national movement. Provides a historical overview of the Zionist-Palestinian conflict to familiarize undergraduates with the background of the current situation.

EAST AFRICA & THE SWAHILI COAST IN AN INTERCONNECTED WORLD MDES W3130
Professor Kai Kresse  

This course offers an introduction to East African history and society. Students read anthropological and historical studies of the region, alongside works of literature by a number of leading East African writers. The course emphasizes the historical role of the Swahili coast and Swahili language, as forces that shaped an interconnected world stretching far inland and across the Indian Ocean, but that also shaped adversity and antagonisms. The course examines a number of themes and case studies that illustrate these social dynamics in the region over the long term, including religion (particularly Islam), trade, and family networks. It also considers the history of colonialism in East Africa and the variety of postcolonial scenarios. It looks at politics, literature, and popular culture (including poetry, dance, and song) as part of the wider field of social interaction to be investigated. This course is intended primarily for those who have taken an introductory course in African studies, such as ANTH 2010, AFCV 1020, or similar courses.

ZIONISM: A CULTURAL PERSPECTIVE MDES W3541
Professor Dan Miron  

The course, based on Zionist texts of various kinds, will offer a view of Zionism as a cultural revolution aimed at redefining Judaism and the Jewish Identity.

A HISTORY OF AFRICAN CITIES MDES W3915
Professor Jinny Prais  

This seminar examines the political, social, and cultural life of African cities in the pre-colonial, colonial and post-colonial periods. It explores historical forms of urban cultures, political economies, leisure and social activities, and visual and literary and representations that are shaped by and shape the various ways that urban dwellers experience life in their cities. Broadly, we will consider: (1) the space and environment of African cities; (2) the institutions and representations of the city; (3) global and diasporic elements of African cities; and (4) topics such as urban life, women, gender, leisure, and religion.

SCIENCE ACROSS CULTURES INSM C3940
Professor George A. Saliba  

Open to seniors and some qualified juniors. Priority given to seniors. Development of scientific thought from various cultures and from antiquity till the time of the European Renaissance. Provides examples of the process by which scientific thinking has developed and illustrates that although science may not have always developed in a linear fashion, the problems science was called upon to solve exhibited a continuity that crossed cultural, linguistic, and religious borders. Prerequisites: Enrollment limited

CONTEMPORARY TURKEY THROUGH A CONSTRUCTED LENS MDES W3943
Professor David C. Cuthell  

Turkey today is a nation of seventy three million people occupying a space on the globe that is squarely in the middle of East and West. The Turkish economy has been one of the world's top performers during the past five years and contemporary Turks are increasingly connected to their peers and the outside world. The result has been an explosion of creative energy in art, music and especially in Turkish film which is in the vanguard of the many societal debates, including the role of Islam, women's rights, economic and social justice, and the question of whether or not Turkey is of the East or the West, to name a few. This course will examine a series of Turkish films in an effort to explore the many issues and debates in Turkish society. It will aim to strip away the constructed artifice of the directors and examine the social and political debates that underlie these works. To do so the course will also involve a series of readings that will examine film and film criticism as well as those that will supply a contemporary and historical background of Turkey.

HONORS THESIS SEMINAR MDES W3960
Professor Allison Busch  

This is a one-year course that begins in the fall semester (1 point) and continues through the spring semester (3 points). Only students who have completed both semesters will receive the full 4 points of credit. Prerequisites: Minimum GPA of 3.5 in MESAAS courses. The MESAAS honors seminar offers students the opportunity to undertake a sustained research project under close faculty supervision. The DUS advises on general issues of project design, format, approach, general research methodologies, and timetable. In addition, students work with an individual advisor who has expertise in the area of the thesis and can advise on the specifics of method and content. The thesis will be jointly evaluated by the adviser, the DUS, and the honors thesis TA. The DUS will lead students through a variety of exercises that are directly geared to facilitating the thesis. Students build their research, interpretive, and writing skills; discuss methodological approaches; write an annotated bibliography; learn to give constructive feedback to peers and respond to feedback effectively. The final product is a polished research paper in the range of 40-60 pages.

POLITICS, RELIGION & THE SECULAR:THEORIES AND METHODS MDES G4004
Professor Youssef Belal  

According to the narratives of modernity, “religion” has been differentiated from (and often opposed to) the “non-religious”, notably to the social, the legal, the political and the economic spheres. Although this differentiation is contestable and ungroundable, it is nevertheless effective, not without tensions. “Religion” and the other spheres are shaped and transformed by the contradictory demands of modernity and secularism, which rely on an unstable category of religion.

This course examines the theorization of the category of “religion” and the “non-religious” in the narratives of modernity, particularly in the sociology and anthropology of religion, and its usages in the Islamic colonial and post-colonial contexts. It relies on a close reading of some of the classical texts of the sociology and anthropology of religion, the anthropology of Islam and recent contributions to the critical study of the categories of the religious and the secular. Monographs and other writings on the colonial and post-colonial periods will also be used.

MUSLIM SPAIN: LITERATURE & SOCIETY MDES W4223
Professor Alan Verskin  

For almost eight centuries, Muslim Spain was distinguished by great cultural, religious and ethnic diversity. Sometimes peaceful, sometimes volatile, it was in this region that some of Islam's greatest intellectual and cultural accomplishments were achieved. This course examines life in Muslim Spain through an examination of the chronicles, poetry, literature, philosophy and legal works that were produced there.

ISLAMIC CONTEXT ARABIAN NIGHTS CLME G4227
Professor Muhsin Al-Musawi  

This course questions the popular assumption that the tales of the Thousand and One Nights lack any Islamic content and that their fantastic or erotic dimensions are the only dynamic narrative components behind the vogue. This collection is read against a number of contemporaneous writings (in English translation), including al-Hamadan’s Manama, to discuss issues that relate to market inspectorships, economy, social order, marginal groups like the mad, the use of public space including the hammed, and the position on fate, destiny, time, afterlife, sex and love. The course takes its starting point from classical Arabic narratives, poetry and epistolary art and follows up the growth of this repository as it conveys, reveals, or debates Islamic tenets and jurists’ stand. The course aspires to provide students with a solid and wide range of information and knowledge on Islamic culture since the emergence of the Islamic center in Baghdad (b. 762). Students are expected to develop a critical method and insightful analysis in dealing with the text, its contemporaneous works from among the belletristic tradition and popular lore, its adaptations, and use and misuse in Arabic culture since the ninth century. Prerequisites: No prior knowledge of Arabic language is required.

ARAB STREET: POLITICS & POETICS OF TRANSFORMATION CLME G4228
Professor Muhsin Al-Musawi  

This course responds to the sweeping winds of change in the Arab region, covering a great amount of archival and media material including documentaries, films, narratives, poetry and songs. It substantiates and synthesizes its analysis with a theoretical frame that makes use of Arab intellectual thought in translation, along with legacies of popular revolutions and liberation movements in the Arab region and in the three continents, along with readings of significance in the literature of World War I and II. The course initiates its discussion with experts' speculations on the difference between the deliberate 'creative chaos' as part of an imperial strategy, and popular revolutions that swept some autocratic and dictatorial regimes. To reach a better understanding of this difference, the course will explore the rites of passage through which these movements grow and authenticate their presence before finding the right medium or occasion to burst out in a volcanic fashion. The course explores: memory, the changing role of the elite, youth movements, people's leadership, the changing lexicon, conceptualization of nationhood, social media and solidarity, regional specifics and common concerns, and the rise of a new poetics as a confederation of semiotics, rhetoric and expressive devices. In their presentations and research students are encouraged to participate in archival material gathering, analysis of required texts and active participation in roundtable discussions.

THE ARAB UPRISINGS: CONTEXTS, ORIGINS, AND SIGNIFICANCE MDES G4254
Professor Mayssoun Succarieh  

This course examines the recent uprisings in Tunisia, Syria, Egypt, Libya, Yemen, and the Gulf, exploring the social and economic transformations that swept the Arab World and investigating the origins and significance of the 2011 uprisings. It examines the interplay of culture, political economy, and history to help us contextualize the ongoing Arab revolts. The course sheds light on the different facets of these uprisings by examining the interplay of culture, politics and economics, and historical context. Drawing on readings in multiple disciplines, and comparing different theoretical approaches, the course engages debates about the changing contours of the Middle East and North Africa in a world marked by economic crisis.

THE ARMENIAN GENOCIDE OF 1915: LITERARY AND ARTISTIC RESPONSES MDES G4326
Professor Armen Marsoobian  

There are many approaches to the study of genocide. While the historian's methods often rely upon an examination of the archive, both for official documentation and eyewitness testimony, this is not the only approach that is worthy of undertaking. Genocide is a highly complex human phenomenon that engenders complex responses on the part of individuals - both by those who were directly affected by the violence and those in the generations that followed. Literature and the arts - both visual and performing - have tried to make sense of this most evil of crimes. In the case of the Armenian Genocide, a genocide that soon vanished in the general public consciousness and was often called, "Forgotten Genocide," response has the complicating factor of Turkish denial. Historians attempt to respond to the state sponsored denial of the Genocide through evidential refutation; artists create works of art that generate new meaning for audiences and readers. While we may search for answers in these works, they often raise new and often troubling questions. It is often remarked that art is about memory. We will use art to explore the memories of the Armenian Genocide.

COURT CULTURES OF INDIA MDES G4621
Professor Allison Busch  

This course approaches the phenomenon of princely India from a range of perspectives. Students learn about the political and cultural practices of specific courts that played a major role in Indian history such as the Guptas, Vijayanagarm and the Mughals, while also being exposed to aspects of Indian courtly life more generally. Topics include, among others, literature, art, architecture, intellectual practices, music and the science of erotics (Kamasutra). While the emphasis is on Indian court culture as seen from within India, cross cultural perspectives are also introduced. For instance, why were Sanskrit literature and Indian architecture emulated far afield in Southeast Asia in the first millenium? And how was Indian court culture perceived by Europeans in the early modern and colonial periods? The course concludes with some reflections on the legacy of Mughals and maharajas in postcolonial India.

READINGS IN URDU LITERATURE II MDES W4636
Professor Frances Pritchett  

Conducted largely in Urdu. Includes reading and discussion of selected literary, social science, historical, and/or journalistic texts. Since the content changes each term, the course may be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: MDES W4630 or the instructor's permission.

19TH CENTURY INDIAN MUSLIMS HSME G4643
Professor S. Akbar Zaidi  

This is an advanced undergraduate/graduate history seminar course over thirteen weeks, designed to introduce upper level students to the study of Muslims in colonial India in the nineteenth century. Although dealing with this period, the main focus of this course will be on social, religious and political developments, inspired by, and affecting, India's Muslims in the second half of the century.

IRAN: FILM, FICTION, POETRY AND HISTORY CLME G4733
Professor Hamid Dabashi  

Through varied exposure to Iranian film and fiction, and Persian poetry, this course is designed to introduce students to critical themes and creative effervescence of modern Iranian culture. The course will concentrate on Iranian cultural history of the last two centuries, with particular emphasis on contemporary issues.

READINGS IN AFRICAN INTELLECTUAL HISTORY MDES G6144
Professor Kai Kresse  

This seminar is conducted entirely in Arabic sources. We will carefully read various passages or chapters from the works of Ușūl al-Fiqh as well as from related genres. The goal is to train students in this complex and difficult field, beginning with how to read, analyze and finally master its texts. Individual words and concepts will be subject to “archaeological” scrutiny, meaning that every technical word must be checked against its various uses in other works (from various periods) in the same genre as well as in technical dictionaries.

ISLAMIC LAW THROUGH TEXTS MDES G6232
Professor Wael Hallaq  

This graduate seminar is conducted entirely in Arabic sources. We will read various passages from the Quran in order to highlight the Quran’s moral imperatives about living in nature as well as about the generation of wealth and its distribution within the social order. We will then move on to examine the genre of fiqh (substantive law) with regard to the same themes, examining the moral structures of society in terms of the ethic of spending. Themes such as making money, building capital, charity, welfare, etc. will be examined in depth as constituting a system of checks-and-balances, through close readings of the concepts of kasb, zakat, sadaqa, waqf, etc. PROFICIENCY IN ARABIC REQUIRED.

ADVANCED READINGS IN LEGAL THEORY MDES G6234
Professor Wael Hallaq  

This seminar is conducted entirely in Arabic sources. We will carefully read various passages or chapters from the works of Usūl al-Fiqh as well as from related genres. The goal is to train students in this complex and difficult field, beginning with how to read, analyze and finally master its texts. Individual words and concepts will be subject to “archaeological” scrutiny, meaning that every technical word must be checked against its various uses in other works (from various periods) in the same genre as well as in technical dictionaries. PROFICIENCY IN ARABIC REQUIRED.

DYNAMICS OF ISRAELI CULTURE CLME G6530
Professor Dan Miron  

The course will survey the development of Israeli Literature within three time sections and along the evolving process of its three main genres. The time sections are those a) the birth of Israeli literature in the aftermath of the 1948 War (the 1950s); b)the maturation of Israeli literature during the 1960s and 1970s; c) Israeli Literature in the era of the peace process and the Intifadas (1980s and 1990s). The genres are those of lyrical poetry, prose fiction (mainly novels), and drama. The course will also follow the crystallization of three sets of Israeli poetics: the conservative (realistic) one, the modernist, and the post-modernist ones. All texts will be available in English translations. Participation does not depend on former knowledge of Hebrew or Israeli literature.

POSTCOLONIAL THEORY MDES G6600
Professor Hamid Dabashi  

This course will go over some philosophical and interpretative problems raised by recent works in a field described as "postcolonial theory". It will start with the original debates about "Orientalism" – particularly its critical arguments about the question of representation of the Orient in art and literature, the question of the writing of history, and the logic of basic concepts in the social sciences. The course will analyse some "Orientalist" texts in detail, assess the criticisms offered by postcolonial writers, and take up these three problems – of representation, history and conceptualization for detailed, rigorous critical discussion.

DISSERTATION COLLOQUIUM MDES G8008
Professor Timothy Mitchell  

UNIVERSALIZING SEXUALITY MDES G8220
Professor Joseph A. Massad  

This doctoral seminar will address how the universalization of sexuality as an essential human (and sometime animal) attribute that transcends cultures began to be studied in U.S. academia in earnest in the 1970s, proceeding apace with the mobilization for sexual rights in U.S. domestic social activism, and by the 1980s with the mobilization of universal human rights as a central agenda for both U.S. foreign policy and international activism.

 

LANGUAGE COURSES


Middle East Languages


Arabic

ARABIC FOR HERITAGE SPEAKERS II MDES W1209
Youssef Nouhi Registrar's Information
FIRST YEAR ARABIC II MDES W1211
Youssef Nouhi Registrar's Information
Reem Faraj Registrar's Information
Tarik Belhoussein Registrar's Information
May Ahmar Registrar's Information
Taoufik Ben-Amor Registrar's Information
Tarik Belhoussein Registrar's Information

An introduction to the language of classical and modern Arabic literature.

FIRST YEAR ARABIC I MDES W1210
Ouijdane Absi Registrar's Information

An introduction to the language of classical and modern Arabic literature.

SECOND YEAR ARABIC II MDES W1215
Ghada Badawi Registrar's Information
Rym Bettaieb Registrar's Information
Tarik Belhoussein Registrar's Information

Prerequisite: MDES W1210-W1211 or the equivalent. A continuation of the study of the language of contemporary writing.

SECOND YEAR ARABIC I MDES W1214
Reem Faraj Registrar's Information

Prerequisite: MDES W1210-W1211 or the equivalent. A continuation of the study of the language of contemporary writing.

THIRD YEAR ARABIC I MDES W4210
Ouijdane Absi Registrar's Information
THIRD YEAR ARABIC II MDES W4211
Ghada Badawi Registrar's Information
Rym Bettaieb Registrar's Information
4TH YEAR ARABIC II: MODERN PROSE MDES W4213
May Ahmar Registrar's Information

Prerequisites: MDES W4212 Through reading a full novel, Tayyib Salah's Season of Migration to the North, students will be able to increase their fluency and accuracy in Arabic while working on reading and being exposed to the main themes in modern Arabic literature, acquiring a sense of literary style as well as literary analytical terminology and concepts. The novel will be divided into twelve parts that the students will read in detail, writing critical pieces, engaging in discussion, and having assignments which will expand their vocabulary, manipulation of advanced grammar concepts, and employment of stylistic devices in their writing. The course works with all four skills (listening, speaking, reading and writing). Arabic is the language of instruction.

ADVANCED ARABIC II: CLASSIC PROSE MDES W4214
Taoufik Ben-Amor Registrar's Information

Prerequisites: MDES W4212 Through reading excerpts from thirteen essential works, starting with Jabarti's history of the French Campaign in Egypt to a chapter from al-Qur'an, students will be able to increase their fluency and accuracy in Arabic while working on reading text and being exposed to the main themes in Classical Arabic literature, acquire a sense of literary style over a period of fourteen centuries as well as literary analytical terminology and concepts. The texts are selections from essential works that the students will read in detail, write critical pieces, engage in discussion and have assignments which will expand their vocabulary, manipulation of advanced grammar concepts, and employing stylistic devices in their writing. This course will enable students to start doing research in classical Arabic sources and complements MEALAC's graduate seminar Readings in Classical Arabic. The course works with all four skills (listening, speaking, reading and writing). Arabic is the language of instruction.


Hebrew

1ST YEAR MODERN HEBREW: ELEMENTARY II MDES W1511
Rina Kreitman Registrar's Information
Illan Gonen Registrar's Information

This is an introductory course for which no prior knowledge is required. Equal emphasis is given to listening, speaking, reading, writing and grammar. Daily homework includes grammar exercises, short answers, reading, or paragraph writing. Frequent vocabulary and grammar quizzes.

2ND YEAR MODERN HEBREW: INTERMEDIATE II MDES W1513
Rina Kreitman Registrar's Information
Illan Gonen Registrar's Information
Rina Kreitman Registrar's Information

Prerequisites: Prerequisite: MDES W1511 or the equivalent. Equal emphasis is given to listening, speaking, reading and writing. Regular categories of the Hebrew verb, prepositions, and basic syntax are taught systematically. Vocabulary building. Daily homework includes grammar exercises, short answers, reading, or short compositions. Frequent vocabulary and grammar quizzes.

HEBREW FOR HERITAGE SPEAKERS II MDES W1518
Nehama R. Bersohn Registrar's Information
3RD YEAR MODERN HEBREW II MDES W4511
Nehama R. Bersohn Registrar's Information

Prerequisites: Hebrew W1513 or W1515 or the instructor's permission. Students are expected to have basic familiarity with regular and irregular verbs in five categories of the Hebrew verb system: Pa'al, Pi'el, Hif'il, Hitpa'el and Nif'al. The course focuses on vocabulary building and on development of reading skills, using adapted literary and journalistic texts with and without vowels. Verb categories of Pu'al and Huf'al are taught systematically. Other verb forms are reviewed in context. A weekly hour is devoted to practice in conversation. Daily homework includes reading, short answers, compositions, listening to web-casts, and giving short oral presentations via voice e-mail. Frequent vocabulary quizzes.


Persian

ELEMENTARY PERSIAN II MDES W1711
Hassan Hussain Registrar's Information
Hassan Hussain Registrar's Information

An introduction to the spoken and written language of contemporary Iran.

INTERMEDIATE PERSIAN II MDES W1713
Ghazzal Dabiri Registrar's Information

Prerequisite: MDES W1710-W1711 or the equivalent. A general review of the essentials of grammar; practice in spoken and written Persian; Arabic elements in Persian; selected readings emphasizing Iranian life and culture; materials from Tajikistan and Afghanistan, Indari.

ADVANCED PERSIAN II MDES W4711
Ghazzal Dabiri Registrar's Information

Turkish

ELEMENTARY MODERN TURKISH II MDES W1911
Zuleyha Colak Registrar's Information
INTERMEDIATE MODERN TURKISH II MDES W1913
Ihsan Colak Registrar's Information
ADVANCED TURKISH II MDES W4911
Ihsan Colak Registrar's Information
BEGINNING OTTOMAN TURKISH II MDES W4922
Ihsan Colak Registrar's Information
INTERMEDIATE OTTOMAN TURKISH II MDES W4927
Zuleyha Colak Registrar's Information

Armenian

ELEMENTARY ARMENIAN II MDES W1311
Charry Karamanoukian Registrar's Information
INTERMEDIATE ARMENIAN II MDES W1313
Charry Karamanoukian Registrar's Information

Prerequisites: MDES W1310-W1311 or the equivalent. A continuation of the study of reading, writing and speaking of Armenian.


South Asian Languages


Sanskrit

ELEMENTARY SANSKRIT II MDES W1402
Guy Leavitt Registrar's Information

An introduction to classical Sanskrit. Grammar and reading of texts.

INTERMEDIATE SANSKRIT II MDES W1405
Guy Leavitt Registrar's Information

Reading and grammatical analysis of a literary text, chosen from the dramatic and narrative tradition.

ADVANCED SANSKRIT II MDES W4812
Guy Leavitt Registrar's Information

Prerequisites: Two years of Sanskrit or instructor permission The two levels of advanced Sanskrit are typically given in alternate years. In 2011-12, kavya and alankarasastra will be offered; in 2013-14, mimamsa and nyaya. Additional courses, including Introduction to Panini and Introduction to the Literary Prakrits, are also available periodically. Final examinations will be required of all students in the first year of Advanced Sanskrit. In the second year, students are required to prepare a research project in lieu of the examination. This may be a research paper, a book or articles review, a bibliographical study, a translation, or whatever will advance the student’s research capabilities.


Hindi-Urdu

HINDI FOR HERITAGE SPEAKERS II MDES W1609
Rakesh Ranjan Registrar's Information

This is an accelerated course for students of South Asian origin who already possess a knowledge of basic vocabulary and limited speaking and listening skills in Hindi. They may not have sufficient skills in reading and writing but are able to converse on familiar topics such as: self, family, likes, dislikes and immediate surroundings. This course will focus on developing knowledge of the basic grammar of Hindi and vocabulary enrichment by exposing students to a variety of cultural and social topics related to aspects of daily life; and formal and informal registers. Students will be able to read and discuss simple texts and write about a variety of everyday topics by the end of the semester.

URDU FOR HERITAGE SPEAKERS II MDES W1615
Aftab Ahmad Registrar's Information

Prerequisites: A knowledge of basic vocabulary and limited speaking and listening skills in Urdu. An accelerated course for students of South Asian origin who already possess a knowledge of basic vocabulary and limited speaking and listening skills in Urdu.

ELEMENTARY HINDI-URDU II MDES W1611
Aftab Ahmad Registrar's Information
Rakesh Ranjant Registrar's Information

An introduction to the most widely spoken language of South Asia. Along with an understanding of the grammar, the course offers practice in listening and speaking. The Hindi (Devanagari) script is used for reading and writing.

INTERMEDIATE HINDI-URDU II MDES W1613
Aftab Ahmad Registrar's Information
Dalpat Rajpurohit Registrar's Information

Prerequisites: MDES W1610-W1611 or the instructor's permission. Continuing practice in listening, speaking, and grammatical understanding. Along with the Hindi (Devanagari) script, the Urdu (Perso-Arabic) script is taught in the class; both scripts are used for reading and writing.

ADVANCED HINDI-URDU II MDES W4625
Dalpat Rajpurohit Registrar's Information

This is a third year (or sixth semester) course in the Hindi-Urdu program that aims to continue building upon the existing listening, speaking, reading, writing and cultural skills in Hindi and Urdu. Students will be expected to expand their vocabulary, enhance their structural accuracy and develop their cultural appropriateness through their enthusiastic participation in classroom activities and immersing themselves in the speech community outside. The objective of the course is to strengthen students’ language skills and to go beyond them to understand and describe situations and people, understand and discuss short stories, news items and events. Writing in the target language will be emphasized throughout as a support skill to enable students to use their diverse vocabulary and grammatical structures.

READINGS IN URDU LITERATURE II MDES W4636
Frances Pritchett Registrar's Information

Prerequisites: MDES W1613 or the instructor's permission. Conducted largely in Hindi. Includes reading and discussion of selected literary, social science, historical, and/or journalistic texts. Since the content changes each term, the course may be repeated for credit.


Tamil

ELEMENTARY TAMIL II MDES W1102
D. Samuel Sudanandha Registrar's Information

Introduces students to the basic grammatical and syntactical skills required to function adequately in a Tamil-speaking environment. Of particular interest to students planning to conduct scholarly research or fieldwork in that region of the world. Introduces students to the rich culture of the Indian subcontinent where Tamil is spoken.

INTERMEDIATE TAMIL II MDES W1202
D. Samuel Sudanandha Registrar's Information

Prerequisites: MDES W1101-W1102 or the instructor's permission. Further develops students' written and oral proficiency in order to allow them to function adequately in a Tamil-speaking environment. Of particular interest to students planning to conduct scholarly research or fieldwork in a Tamil-speaking context. Develops the students' appreciation for the rich culture of the Indian subcontinent where Tamil is spoken.

ADVANCED TAMIL II MDES W4119
D. Samuel Sudanandha Registrar's Information

 



African Languages


Pulaar

ELEMENTARY PULAAR II PULAAR W1102
Mariame Sy Registrar's Information

Introduction to the basic grammatical structures of Pulaar, a major language of West Africa spoken in the Senegal River valley area.

Swahili

ELEMENTARY SWAHILI II SWHL W1101
Abdul Nanji Registrar's Information
Jane N. Clayton Registrar's Information

Essentials of grammar, basic vocabulary, practice in speaking and reading Swahili the most widely used indigenous language of East Africa.

INTERMEDIATE SWAHILI II SWHL W1202
Abdul Nanji Registrar's Information

Prerequisites: SWHL 1101-1102 or instructor's permission A review of the essentials of Swahili grammar; detailed analysis of Swahili texts; practice in conversation.

ADVANCED SWAHILI II SWHL W3336
Abdul Nanji Registrar's Information

Wolof

ELEMENTARY WOLOF II WOLOF W1102
Mariame Sy Registrar's Information

Introduction to the basic grammatical structures of Wolof, a major language of West Africa spoken in Senegal and Gambia.

INTERMEDIATE WOLOF II WOLOF W1202
Mariame Sy Registrar's Information

Prerequisites: WLOF W1101-W1102 or the instructor's permission. Further develop a student's knowledge of Wolof, a major language of West Africa spoken primarily in Senegal and Gambia.

ADVANCED WOLOF II WOLOF W3332
Mariame Sy Registrar's Information

Zulu

ELEMENTARY ZULU II ZULU W1102
John Zuzo Registrar's Information

Introduces students to the basic structures of Zulu, a Bantu language spoken in South Africa, especially in the Zululand area of Kwa Zulu/Natal province

INTERMEDIATE ZULU II ZULU W1202
John Zuzo Registrar's Information

Prerequisites: ZULU W1201-W1202 or the instructor's permission. Provides students with an in-depth review of the essentials of the Zulu grammar. Students are also able to practice their language skills in conversation.