Home Help
 Academic Programs
 Research
 Libraries
 Medical Center
 Athletics
 Arts
 Events Calendar
 Prospective Students
 Students
 Faculty & Staff
 Alumni
 Neighbors
 About Columbia
 A–Z Index
 E-mail & Computing


Columbia News
Search Columbia News
 
Advanced Search
News Home | New York Stories | The Record | Archives | Submit Story Ideas | About | RSS Feed
Columbia Programs Receive Nearly $30 Million in Grants
Money goes to a variety of health-related endeavors

A trio of Columbia University programs have received a total of nearly $30 million in grants to research novel cardiac surgeries, create a multimedia HIV prevention program and refine the sequencing DNA.

Columbia surgeons perform a cardiac surgery
Columbia surgeons perform a cardiac surgery.

The largest award of $23 million goes to the International Center for Health Outcomes and Innovation Research, a joint initiative of Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health and the Department of Surgery at Columbia’s College of Physicians and Surgeons.

The grant, from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, will be used to create a data coordinating center for the newly established Cardiothoracic Surgery Investigations Network. The network brings together leading medical institutions to develop multiple interventions in the field of cardiac surgery in order to evaluate their safety and efficacy as they move from laboratory science to broad clinical use.

The National Institute of Mental Health has awarded a $3.5 million grant to the School of Social Work’s Social Intervention Group and Columbia Center for New Media Teaching and Learning. The five-year research grant will fund a collaborative project to evaluate an effort using multimedia and Web-based technology to distribute an HIV prevention program.

Sequencing DNA on a chip in polymerase reaction: Researchers from Columbia University Medical Center have received a $2.8 million grant to refine this process.
Sequencing DNA on a chip in polymerase reaction: Researchers from Columbia University Medical Center have received a $2.8 million grant to refine this process.

Organizers say the project is the first prevention program designed for heterosexual couples at risk of HIV infection and will select 80 community-based organizations in New York State to receive either the paper or electronic version. The latter will incorporate videos, interactive tools and activities that support both the facilitator in sessions with clients as well as training of the facilitator. The collaborators anticipate the technology to reduce facilitators' preparation time, enabling them to focus more on clients.

Researchers from Columbia University Medical Center have received a $2.8 million grant from National Human Genome Research Institute, part of the National Institutes of Health, to develop novel molecular engineering approaches to decipher the genome on a chip.

The Columbia research team, led by Jingyue Ju, professor of chemical engineering and head of DNA sequencing and chemical biology at Columbia Genome Center, aims to further refine the sequencing.

Published: Aug. 3, 2007
Last modified: Aug 07, 2007