Columbia News Video Brief

Interest in Learning About Experiences Prior Generations Leads to Rise in Holocaust Films, Says SOA's Annette Insdorf

There is still tremendous audience interest in Holocaust films because younger generations want to know what happened to their parents and grandparents and aging survivors feel an urgency to speak, says Annette Insdorf, film professor. Insdorf has researched nearly 300 Holocaust-related films for her book "Indelible Shadows: Film and the Holocaust."

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New Documentaries by Children/Grandchildren of Holocaust Survivors Return to Scene
There is a growing number of documentaries by children and grandchildren of Holocaust survivors that return to the scene of the crime or rescue, says Annette Insdorf, film professor and author of "Indelible Shadows: Film and the Holocaust." Insdorf has researched nearly 300 Holocaust-related films for this book, which won of the 2002 National Board of Review's William K. Everson Award for film history.

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Annette Insdorf

Aging Holocaust Survivors Feel Urgency to Speak
There is still tremendous audience interest in Holocaust films because younger generations want to know what happened to their parents and grandparents and aging survivors feel an urgency to speak, says Insdorf. However, she reminds us that "the authenticity within each film is to be applauded, but the knowledge that this was only a small part of the total historical picture must be acknowledged afterwards."

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Shot: Decc 09, 2002
Published: Feb 17, 2003
Last modified:Jan 29, 2004