Summer Scholarships for Science and Math Courses
Available to Local High School Students

Local teens in the School of Continuing Educationís Summer Program for high school students
						Photo: School of Continuing Education
Local teens in the School of Continuing Educationís Summer Program for high school students
Photo: School of Continuing Education

June 16, 2008

Columbia University’s School of Continuing Education is offering tuition-free science and math courses to high school students who reside or attend school in the neighborhoods surrounding the University, including Harlem, Washington Heights and Inwood.

 

During the summer, 60 scholarships will be available for science and math courses in the School of Continuing Education’s Summer Program for High School Students. Some scholarships are still available for August courses in biological conservation and engineering. High school juniors and seniors who live or attend schools in Manhattan north of 92nd Street may apply.

 

The pharmaceutical manufacturer Pfizer is generously providing more than $250,000 to support the scholarships. The program was arranged with the  assistance of Rep. Charles B. Rangel (D-Harlem).

 

“We’re particularly excited that this funding will allow us to engage local students in the academic life of Columbia,” said Darlene Giraitis, director of secondary school programs. “These scholarship students will be part of an overall student population of more than 1,300 students from 20 countries.”

 

The summer program offers highly motivated students the opportunity to attend classes, labs and lectures at one of the world’s leading universities. Among numerous other benefits, scholarship recipients study alongside students from across the globe while receiving instruction from, and interacting with, leading faculty. Among other subjects, courses on offer include modern mathematics, chemistry, physics, genetics, biomedical engineering and molecular biology.

 

To apply online and to learn more about the programs, visit www.ce.columbia.edu/hs.


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