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   IT IS NOT SURPRISING THAT COLUMBIA PRODUCES OUTSTANDING ALUMNI WHO CONTRIBUTE TO THE WELL-BEING OF THE CITY. OUR LOCATION HELPS ATTRACT A SPECIAL KIND OF STUDENT IN THE FIRST PLACE. APPLICANTS TO COLUMBIA RECOGNIZE THE OPPORTUNITIES AND CHALLENGES THEY WILL ENCOUNTER IN NEW YORK, THE MOST EXCITING EDUCATIONAL MILIEU IN THE COUNTRY.

The Heart of the Enterprise

The city's cultural, scientific, and commercial resources provide a unique working laboratory for students seeking a comprehensive education in virtually any field.

To delineate the nature of the institution's interactions with the city, the following pages highlight three dimensions of the University's mission: education, research, and professional service. In fact, of course, these dimensions do not occur in isolation from each other. For example, a Columbia dentist involved in the DentCare program or a physician staffing a neighborhood clinic may be accompanied by students who are there as part of their educational program. A Columbia doctor is often teaching even as he or she conducts research or performs service for the community.

The three strands also merge in the Urban Technical Assistance Project (UTAP), an independent program based in the Architecture School's Urban Planning Program with support from the Edna McConnell Clark Foundation and the University's Strategic Initiative program. Led by Professor Lionel McIntyre '88ARCH and modeled on the agricultural extension service developed in land grant universities, UTAP provides low-cost urban planning and support services to community organizations. The focus is on research and planning, but the program also features strong educational and service components, with interns from the Architecture School joining high school students and others on projects that have included the revitalization of neighborhoods in Central Harlem, Washington Heights, Inwood, and the South Bronx. One recent project undertaken in cooperation with Manhattan Borough President C. Virginia Fields resulted in a plan for enhancing Frederick Douglass Boulevard in the area from 110th Street to 135th Street.

UTAP may be a one-of-a-kind undertaking, but it also epitomizes Columbia's approach to education. Students learn, both in the classroom and by doing. Faculty members and other experts increase their store of experience and knowledge. And the University and community are stronger thanks to the efforts of diverse partners working together for the benefit of all.

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Section [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 ]