Columbia News Video Forum

War on Terror is Not Foreign Policy, Its American Primacy, Say SIPA Panelists

Leading faculty offer interim assessments on the Sept. 11 attacks and the resulting U.S. foreign policy and war on terrorism during a SIPA panel discussion. American primacy is one of the main reasons for the war on terror, says Richard Betts.

Demetrios James Caraley
 
Demetrios James Caraley

Caraley Warns Against Defocusing America's War on Terror
"It was not Iraq; it was Al Qaeda who killed 3000," says international and public affairs professor and panel chair Demetrios James Caraley. He warns against the defocusing of America's war on terrorism and unilateral war-making powers by President Bush.

Real (8:41)Video
Richard Betts
 
Richard Betts

American Primacy Is a Main Reason for the War on Terror, Says Betts
American primacy is one of the main reasons for the war with terrorists, says Richard Betts, director of the Institute of War and Peace Studies. Terrorists, utilizing asymmetric strategies, have been able to expose weak points in the American system and wreak massive damage with little expense, he says.

Real (12:26)Video
Robert Jervis
 
Robert Jervis

Bush's Position Has Changed from Unilateral Thrust to Maintaining Stability, Says Jervis
Progress in the war on terror is difficult to measure, says Political Science Professor Robert Jervis, who concurs that the war does not represent foreign policy, but rather American primacy. He says Bush came to office with a strong unilateral thrust, but in a post-Sept. 11 world realizes that often he has to take action for the good of the world and to maintain stability.

Real (17:17)Video
Ruth Wedgwood
 
Ruth Wedgwood

Wedgwood Calls for More Cooperation between FBI and CIA
More intense cooperation is needed between the FBI and CIA, says Ruth Wedgwood, Yale law professor. "There's no smoking gun, there's just a thousand pieces of paper." Al Qaeda has attacked as in an act of war, and therefore we should act as if we are in one, she says.

Real (18:21)Video
Warner Schilling
 
Warner Schilling

Terrorists and Their Cells Are Still in Business, Says Schilling
Many terrorists and terror cells, with a lot of initiative, are still potentially in business, says Warner Schilling, professor of international relations. Yet, the war on terrorism is moving to Iraq because many officials "take it personally that Saddam Hussein survived the war," he says.

Real (19:09)Video

Shot: Sep 11, 2002
Published: Oct 28, 2002
Last modified:Nov 06, 2002