Michele Miozzo

Ph.D. from Harvard University (2000) and from University of Trieste, Italy (1997)

 

Journal Articles

  • Miozzo, M., Jacobs, M., & Singer, N. W. S. (in press). The representation of homophones: evidence from anomia. Cognitive Neuropsychology.
  • Caccappolo-van Vliet, E., Miozzo, M., & Stern (in press). Phonological dyslexia: a test case for reading models. Psychological Science.
  • Caccappolo-van Vliet, E., Miozzo, M., & Stern (in press). Phonological dyslexia without phonological impairment? Cognitive Neuropsychology.
  • Caramazza, A., Bi, Y., Costa, A., & Miozzo, M. (2004). What determines the speed of lexical access: homophone or specific-word frequency? Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 30, 278-282.
  • Miozzo, M. (2003). On the processing of regular and irregular forms of verbs and nouns: evidence from neuropsychology. Cognition, 87, 101-127.
  • Miozzo, M., & Caramazza, A. (2003). When more is less: a counterintuitive effect of distractor frequency in the picture-word interference paradigm. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, 132, 228-258.
  • Caccappolo-van Vliet, E., Miozzo, M., Marder, K., & Stern (2003). Where do perseverations come from? Neurocase, 9, 297-307.
  • Morsella, E., & Miozzo, M. (2002). Evidence for a cascade model of lexical access in speech production. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 28, 555-563.
  • Miozzo, M., & De Bastiani, P. (2002). The organization of letter-form representations in written spelling: evidence from acquired dysgraphia. Brain and Language, 80, 366-392.
  • Miozzo, M., Caramazza, & A., Costa, A. (2002). The absence of a gender congruency effect in Romance languages: A matter of SOA? Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 28, 388-391.
  • Caramazza, A., Costa, A., Miozzo, M., Bi, Y. (2001). The representation of homophones: evidence from the frequency effect in picture naming. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 27, 1430-1450.
  • Miozzo, M. & Caramazza, A. (1999). The selection of lexical-syntactic features in noun phrase production: Evidence from the picture-word interference paradigm. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning Memory and Cognition,25, 907-922.
  • Costa, A., Miozzo, M., & Caramazza, A. (1999). Lexical selection in bilinguals: Do words in bilingual's lexicon compete for selection? Journal of Memory and Language, 41, 365-397.
  • Costa, A., Sebastian-Galles, N., Miozzo, M., & Caramazza, A. (1999). The gender congruity effect: evidence from Spanish and Catalan. Language and Cognitive Processes, 14, 381-391.
  • Caramazza, A. & Miozzo, M. (1998). More is not always better: a response to Roelofs, Meyer, and Levelt. Cognition, 69, 231-241.
  • Miozzo, M. & Caramazza, A. (1998). Varieties of Alexia: The case of failure to access graphemic representations. Cognitive Neuropsychology, 15, 203-238.
  • Miozzo, M. & Caramazza, A. (1997a). On knowing the auxiliary of a verb that cannot be named: Evidence for the independence of grammatical and phonological aspects of lexical knowledge. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, 9, 160-166.
  • Miozzo, M. & Caramazza, A. (1997b). Retrieval of lexical-syntactic features in tip-of-the-tongue states. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning Memory and Cognition, 23, 1410-1423.
  • Caramazza, A. & Miozzo, M. (1997). The relation between syntactic and phonological knowledge in lexical access: Evidence from the 'tip-of-the-tongue' phenomenon. Cognition, 64, 309-343.
  • Badecker, W., Miozzo, M., & Zanuttini, R. (1995). The two-stage model of lexical retrieval: Evidence from a case of anomia with selective preservation of grammatical gender. Cognition, 57, 193-216.
  • Sartori, G., Coltheart, M., Miozzo, M., & Job, R. (1994). Category specificity and informational specificity in neuropsychological impairments of semantic memory. In C. A. UmiltÓ & M. Moscovitch (Eds.), Attention & Performance XV. Cambridge (MA): The MIT Press.
  • Caramazza, A., Hillis, A., Leek, E. C., & Miozzo, M. (1994). The organization of lexical knowledge in the brain: Evidence from category- and modality-specific deficits. In L. A. Hirschfeld & S. A. Gelman (Eds.), Mapping the mind. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Sartori, G., Miozzo, M., & Job, R. (1994). Rehabilitation of semantic memory impairments. In M. J., Riddoch & G. W. Humphreys (Eds.), Cognitive Neuropsychology and Cognitive Rehabilitation. Hove: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.
  • Job, R., Miozzo, M., & Sartori, G. (1993). On the existence of category-specific impairments: A reply to Parkin and Steward. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 46A, 511-516.
  • Sartori, G., Miozzo, M., & Job, R. (1993). Category-specific naming impairments? Yes. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 46A, 489-504.
  • Sartori, G., Job, R., Miozzo, M., Zago, S., & Marchiori, G. (1993). Category-specific form-knowledge deficit in a patient with herpes simplex virus encephalitis. Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology, 15, 280-299.


Book Chapters

  • Caramazza, A., Miozzo, M., Costa, A., Schiller, N., & Alario, X-F. (2001). Lexical selection: a cross-language investigation of determiner production. In E. Dupoux (Ed.), Language, Brain and Cognitive Development: Essays in Honor of Jacques Mehler. Cambridge (MA): MIT Press.
  • Sartori, G., Miozzo, M., & Job, R. (1994). Rehabilitation of semantic memory impairments. In M. J., Riddoch & G. W. Humphreys (Eds.), Cognitive Neuropsychology and Cognitive Rehabilitation. Hove: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.
  • Caramazza, A., Hillis, A., Leek, E. C., & Miozzo, M. (1994). The organization of lexical knowledge in the brain: evidence from category- and modality-specific deficits. In L. A. Hirschfeld & S. A. Gelman (Eds.), Mapping the mind. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Sartori, G., Coltheart, M., Miozzo, M., & Job, R. (1994). Category specificity and informational specificity in neuropsychological impairments of semantic memory. In C. A. UmiltÓ & M. Moscovitch (Eds.), Attention & Performance XV. Cambridge (MA): MIT Press.