Patrick Honored for Contributions

Photograph: Professor Hugh Patrick receives the Order of the Sacred Treasure, Gold and Silver, from Ambassador Hiromoto Seki, consul general of Japan in New York. Patrick is the director of the Center on Japanese Economy and Business.

The Government of Japan has honored Columbia Professor Hugh Patrick for a lifetime of outstanding contributions to the study of Japan's economy and to the improvement of U.S.-Japan relations.

Ambassador Hiromoto Seki, consul general of Japan in New York, bestowed the Order of the Sacred Treasure, Gold and Silver on Patrick in a ceremony in New York Dec. 12.

Patrick earned the B.A. and an honorary M.A. from Yale. At the University of Michigan, he earned an M.A. in East Asian studies, and an M.A. and a Ph.D. in economics.

Patrick has authored 105 academic essays and authored or edited 14 books, including most recently The Financial Development of Japan, Korea and Taiwan: Growth, Repression and Liberalization and The Japanese Main Bank System: Its Relevance for Developing and Transforming Economies.

Over the past 35 years he has lectured on Japan's economy at the University of Michigan, Yale and Columbia. At Yale, Patrick was chairman of the Council on East Asian Studies and chairman of the Economic Growth Center.

Established Center

In 1984 he left Yale and joined Columbia's Graduate School of Business where two years later he established the Center on Japanese Economy and Business. He has been director since its creation.

Outside academia Patrick has been a leader in many professional and public service organizations, including serving as chairman of the International Steering Committee of the Pacific Trade and Development Conference series and of the board of the Social Science Research Council. He was a member of the board of directors of the Japan Society for six terms.

He has also served as the only academic among the four American members of the Japan-U.S. Economic Relations Groups appointed by Prime Minister Ohira and President Carter.

His work at the Center on Japanese Economy and Business has been dedicated to promoting America's understanding of Japan and other Asian-Pacific economies.


Columbia University Record -- February 3, 1995 -- Vol. 20, No. 15