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Past Events of Fall 2011

Monday, September 19 - The Mellon Sanskrit Lecture Series
A talk by Alexis G. J. S. Sanderson (Oxford University)

"The Saiva Age: Further Evidence of the Buddhist and Jain Adaptation of Saiva Models and Sources in Early Medieval India"

Introduction by Sheldon Pollock, William B. Ransford Professor of Sanskrit & Indian Studies, Department of Middle Eastern, South Asian and African Studies

Alexis Sanderson is Spalding Professor of Eastern Religions and Ethics, Faculty of Oriental Studies and Sub-faculty of South and Inner Asian Studies, All Souls College, Oxford University). After taking an undergraduate degree first in Classics (1969) and then in Sanskrit (1971) at Balliol College, Oxford, Alexis Sanderson spent six years in Kashmir, studying with a scholar and traditional guru of Saivism. He was Lecturer in Sanskrit in the University of Oxford and a Fellow of Wolfson College from 1977 to 1992. From 1992 to the present he has occupied the Chair of Eastern Religions and Ethics in the same university, and as the holder of that post became a Fellow of All Souls College. His field is early medieval religion in India and Southeast Asia, focusing on the history of Saivism, its relations with the state, and its influence on Buddhism and Vaishnavism.

Time: 4:00pm - 5:30pm
Location: Knox Hall, Room 208, 606 West 122nd Street, between Broadway and Claremont Avenue

Wednesday, September 21 - Lecture
A talk by Ahson Rabbani (The Citizen's Foundation, Pakistan)
"The State of Education in Pakistan and The Citizen Foundation's Role"

Organized by the South Asia Association at SIPA

As Vice President of The Citizens Foundation (TCF), Dr. Rabbani is intimately involved in TCF's 2011 goal of taking ten thousand urban Pakistani children off the streets and enrolling them in TCF schools. Part of his talk highlights their framework for doing this and why it is important for Pakistan. He received a B.E. in Electrical Engineering from NED University of Engineering in Karachi, Pakistan in 1985, as well as an MSEE in Electrical Engineering from the University of Miami (1989), an MBA from the University of Miami (1990), and a Doctorate of Business Administration from the University of Phoenix in 2007, focusing on Determinants of sustained behavior change. Before his position as Vice President of TCF (website: http://www.thecitizensfoundation.org) he was General Manager of Green Star--the largest formal education NGO in Pakistan.

Time: 11:30am - 1:00pm
Location: Room 1512, International Affairs Building (SIPA), 420 West 118th Street at Amsterdam Avenue

Monday, September 26 - South Asia Graduate Student Forum
A Presentation by Anand Venkatkrishnan (Religion)

"Hum Hain Naye, Andaz Kyun Ho Purana?
Hermeneutical Innovations in Advaita Vedanta Intellectual History"

Abstract: The sixteenth-century South Indian polymath Appayya Dik?ita opens his popular encyclopedic work on historical variations in Advaita Vedanta, the Siddhantalesasa?graha (Brief Compendium of the Doctrines), with a series of debates on the srava?avidhi, the so-called "injunction to listen" to the teachings of the Upani?ads. How did the topic of the vidhi, the Vedic injunction, come to gain such prominence in Advaita discourse, which, in its initial phases, tried relentlessly to distance itself from the ritualist implications of its hermeneutical predecessor, the Purva Mima?sa? In this paper, Anand Venkatkrishnan will follow Appayya's historicist instincts and extract vignettes from the intellectual history of the srava?avidhi, in order to argue: a) that the lure of Mima?sa for Vedantins may have owed in some way to the consolidation of monastic institutions in medieval India (13th-14th C.), and b) that the growing challenge of a rival theological school in Dvaita prompted Advaitins in the early-modern period (16th-17th C.) to make new use of this theme to draw clear sectarian lines.

Time: 4:10-6:00pm
Location: Knox Hall, Room 208, 606 West 122nd Street (Between Broadway and Claremont Avenue)

Thursday, September 29 - The Mellon Sanskrit Lecture Series
A talk by Sir James Mallinson

"Yoga and Yogis"

Introduction by Sheldon Pollock, William B. Ransford Professor of Sanskrit & Indian Studies, Department of Middle Eastern, South Asian and African Studies

Sir James Mallinson is an independent scholar of Sanskrit literature. He received his BA and PhD from Oxford University. Mallison's publications for the Clay Sanskrit Library include volumes one and two of The Ocean of the Rivers of Story [Kathasaritsagara by Somadeva] (2007, 2009), as well as volumes one and two of The Emperor of the Sorcerers [Brhatkathaslokasamgraha by Budhasvamin] (2005), Messenger Poems (2006), and from Routledge, Khecarividya of Adinatha: a critical edition and annotated translation of an early text of hathayoga (2007).

Time: 4:00pm - 5:30pm
Location: Knox Hall, Room 207, 606 West 122nd Street, between Broadway and Claremont Avenue

Tuesday, October 11 - The Mellon Sanskrit Lecture Series
A talk by Richard Salomon (University of Washington)

"Fifteen years later: Progress toward recovering the lost Buddhist literature of Gandhara"

Introduction by Sheldon Pollock, William B. Ransford Professor of Sanskrit & Indian Studies, Department of Middle Eastern, South Asian and African Studies

Richard Salomon is Professor, Asian Languages and Literatures at the University of Washington. He directs the British Library/University of Washington Early Buddhist Manuscripts Project, founded in 1996 to promote the study and publication of seventy-seven extant birch-bark scrolls, written in the Kharosthi script and the Gandhari language, housed across several institutions. These manuscripts date from the first century BCE to the third century CE, and as such are the oldest surviving Buddhist manuscripts as well as the earliest manuscripts from South Asia.

Salomon earned his BA at Columbia, and his PhD in Sanskrit from the University of Pennsylvania. His research and teaching fields include Sanskrit and Prakrit language and literature, epigraphy, ancient Indian history, and Gandharan studies. He is the author of Indian Epigraphy: A Guide to the Study of Inscriptions in the Indo-Aryan Languages (1998); and is general editor of the Gandharan Buddhist Texts series, including the Gandhari version of the Rhinoceros Sutra: British Library Kharosthi fragment 5B (2000); and Two Gandhari manuscripts of the Songs of Lake Anavatapta (Anavatapta-gatha): British Library Kharosthi fragment 1 and Senior Scroll 14 (2008).

Time: 4:00pm - 5:30pm
Location: Knox Hall, Room 207, 606 West 122nd Street, between Broadway and Claremont Avenue

Friday - Saturday, October 14 -15 - Conference
Beyond Security:
Democratic Contestations in Bangladesh and Pakistan

Introduction by Ambassador Abdullah Hussain Haroon, Permanent Representative of Pakistan to the United Nations

Plenary Speakers:

Aitzaz Ahsan (Lawyer's Movement; Past President, Supreme Court Bar Association)
Sara Hossain (Advocate, High Court Division, Supreme Court of Bangladesh)

Participants include:

Hassan Abbas (National Defense University)
Aasim Sajjad Akhtar (Quaid-e-Azam University)
Sajeda Amin (Population Council)
Janaki Bakhle (Columbia University)
Partha Chatterjee (Columbia University)
Jamal Elias (University of Pennsylvania)
Ananya Jahanara Kabir (University of Leeds)
Amina Jamal (Ryerson College)
Elizabeth Kolsky (Villanova University)
Auj Khan (Stony Brook University)
Brian Larkin (Barnard College)
David Lewis (London School of Economics)
Naeem Mohaiemen (independent scholar)
Nayanika Mookherjee (University of Durham)
Shuja Nawaz (Atlantic Council)
Ali Riaz (Illinois State University)
Yasmin Saikia (Arizona State University)
Aqil Shah (Harvard University)
Dina Siddiqi (Hunter College, CUNY)
Willem van Schendel (University of Amsterdam)
Saadia Toor (College of Staten Island, CUNY)
Mooed Yusuf (US Institute for Peace)
S. Akbar Zaidi (Columbia University)
Afiya Shehrbano Zia (independent scholar)

Schedule of panels and speakers

Time: Friday, October 14, 9:00am to 6:30pm
         Saturday, October 15, 10:00am to 6:30pm

Location: International Affairs Building, 15th floor, 420 West 118th Street at Amsterdam Avenue

Co-sponsored by
Department of History
Department of Middle Eastern, South Asian, and African Studies
Institute for Religion, Culture, and Public Life
Institute for Research on Women and Gender
Institute for Social and Economic Research and Policy
School of International and Public Affairs

With special thanks to Zeelaf and Munir Mashooqullah, Dr. Azra Raza, and Pakistan International Airlines.
Funded by the U.S. Department of Education and the Taraknath Das Foundation

Tuesday, October 18 - Book Reading and Discussion
With Aatish Taseer

Aatish Taseer has worked as a reporter for Time Magazine and has written for the Sunday Times, the Sunday Telegraph, the Financial Times, Prospect, TAR Magazine and Esquire. He is the author of Stranger to History: a Son's Journey through Islamic Lands (2009) and a highly acclaimed translation Manto: Selected Stories (2008). His novel, The Temple-Goers (2010) was shortlisted for the 2010 Costa First Novel Award. A second novel, Noon, is to be published later this year by Picador (UK) and Faber & Faber (USA). He lives between London and Delhi.

Time: 5:00pm - 6:30pm
Location: Knox Hall, Room 208, 606 West 122nd Street, between Broadway and Claremont Avenue



Monday, October 24 - Distinguished Lecture Series
A talk by H. L. Seneviratne (Virginia)

"Re-Discovering Buddhism: Some Aspects of Revivalism in Mid 20th Century Sri Lanka"

Introduction by Professor E. Valentine Daniel, Department of Anthropology

H. L. Seneviratne is Professor Emeritus in the Anthropology Department, University of Virginia. He received his PhD from the University of Rochester. Seneviratne has been a Fellow at Cambridge, Chicago and Harvard and has been awarded grants by NEH, SSRC, and Fulbright. His research interests include religion and politics, socialism, classical social theory, human rights, democracy and free market economy, ethno-nationalism, cinema, art and popular culture. His published work includes The Work of Kings: The New Buddhism in Sri Lanka (2000) and Rituals of the Kandyan State (1978) and the edited volume The Anthropologist and the Native: Essays for Gananath Obeyesekere (2009).

Time: 4:00pm - 5:30pm
Location: Knox Hall, Room 208, 606 West 122nd Street, between Broadway and Claremont Avenue

Tuesday, October 25 - The Mellon Sanskrit Lecture Series
A talk by Dragomir Dimitrov (University of Marburg)

"The Legacy of the Jewel Mind: On the Oeuvre of the Buddhist Scholar Ratnamati"

Introduction by Sheldon Pollock, William B. Ransford Professor of Sanskrit & Indian Studies, Department of Middle Eastern, South Asian and African Studies

Dragomir Dimitrov is Assistant professor at the Department of Indology and Tibetology, Faculty of Foreign Languages, University of Marburg, where he received his PhD in 2004. Dimitrov served as Local Representative of the Nepalese-German Manuscript Cataloguing Project and Acting Director of the Nepal Research Centre in Kathmandu, Nepal from 2004-2007. His most recent publications include the annotated editions Sabdalamkaradsavibhaga (2011), and The Bhaiksuki Manuscript of the Candralamkara. (2010).

Time: 4:00pm - 5:30pm
Location: Knox Hall, Room 207, 606 West 122nd Street, between Broadway and Claremont Avenue

Monday, October 31 - University Seminar
EVENT CANCELED
A talk by Imran Aslam (President, GEO-TV Pakistan)

"Media in Pakistan: Hope, Hype or Hysteria"

The talk will be followed by a no-host dinner (about $24) at *Faculty House. If you wish to attend the Seminar Dinner following Imran Aslam's talk, please RSVP as soon as possible by notifying our substitute rapporteur, Ariel Rubin (email:ajr2112@columbia.edu).

Time: 4:00pm - 5:30pm
Location: Room 1, Faculty House, 64 Morningside Drive (between 116th - 118th Streets)
*Directions to the meeting at Faculty House: http://facultyhouse.columbia.edu/content/contact-us-new-york-event-and-reception-venue#Directions

Tuesday, November 1 - The Mellon Sanskrit Lecture Series
A talk by Lyne Bansat-Boudon (EPHE and EHESS)

"Satisfied with the Performance: An Embryonic Aesthetics in the Indian Theatre's Myth of Origin"

Introduction by Sheldon Pollock, William B. Ransford Professor of Sanskrit & Indian Studies, Department of Middle East, South Asia and African Studies

Lyne Bansat-Boudon is Directeur d'Etudes, Ecole pratique des hautes études, Section des sciences religieuses, Sorbonne; and Directeur d'Etudes, at the Centre d'études de l'Inde et de l'Asie du sud, L'École des hautes études en sciences sociales. She is an honorary senior member of the Institut Universitaire de France. Bansat-Boudon recently published, with Kamalesha Tripathi, The Paramarthasara of Abhinavagupta and Its Commentary by Yogaraja (2010).

Time: 4:00pm - 5:30pm
Location: Knox Hall, Room 207, 606 West 122nd Street, between Broadway and Claremont Avenue

Tuesday, November 1, 2011 - Lecture
A talk by Nand Kishore Singh
"Reinvigorating the Indian Economy: Governance and Other Reforms"

N. K. Singh will speak to the Indian Economy Class co-taught by Professors Jagdish Bhagwati and Arvina Panagariya on the topic of "Reform in The Indian Economy." Mr. Singh is a renowned politician, economist and former top bureaucrat. He is currently a Member of Parliament in the Rajya Sabha as a representative of the state of Bihar, from the Janata Dal (United) party. Mr. Singh has served as an IAS officer with top positions in the Ministry of Finance and Home Affais. In 1998, he became Principle Secretary to then Prime Minister, A. B. Vajpayee. Additionally, he has taken up various international responsibilities in the UN, World Economic Forum, Indian Embassy (Tokyo), IMF, etc. He has contributed several articles in the field of economics to India's biggest dailies, The Financial Express and The Indian Express.

Space is limited.
Register for the event here.

Time: 4:00pm - 5:45pm
Location: International Affairs Building, Room 151, 420 West 118th Street at Amsterdam Avenue

Tuesday, November 1 - Reading and Discussion
Reading and Discussion with Arvind Krishna Mehrotra (Allahabad)
Introduction by Jack Hawley (Religion, Barnard College)

"Translating the Indian Past: The Poets' Experience"

Organized by the Center for Translation Studies at Barnard College.

Poet and translator Arvind Krishna Mehrotra teaches at the University of Allahabad. Among his translations are The Absent Traveller: Prakrit Love Poetry from the Gathasaptasati of Satavahana Hala (2008), and most recently Songs of Kabir (2011), a new and acclaimed rendering of poems of the 15th-century Indian mystic and saint.

Professor Mehrotra will read from and talk about the translations of five Indian poets, Toru Dutt, A. K. Ramanujan, Arun Kolatkar, Dilip Chitre and himself.

Time: 7:00pm - 8:30pm
Location: Event Oval, The Diana Center
Barnard College (entrance at 117th Street and Broadway)
Map: http://www.columbia.edu/content/maps.html

Wednesday, November 2 - Panel Discussion
"Post-War Sri Lanka"

Featuring leaders from the Tamil National Alliance:
K. (Suresh) Premachandran
R. Sampanthan
Mavai S. Senathirajah
M. A. Sumanthiran

With Remarks by:
David L. Phillips (Director, Program on Peace-building and Rights, Institute for the Study of Human Rights)
Professor E. Valentine Daniel (Anthropology Department)

Co-sponsored by the Institute for the Study of Human Rights and the South Asia Institute

A Senior delegation to the United Nations of leaders from the Tamil National Alliance will discuss conditions in Sri Lanka after the defeat of the LTTE, including the status of political talks to address the root causes of conflict through devolution of power, fiscal decentralization, local policing, and minority language rights.

Time: 5:00 - 6:30 pm
Location: Room 801, International Affairs Building, 420 W. 118th Street at Amsterdam Avenue

Wednesday, November 9 - Workshop
"Sacred Sites: Post-Gujarat Hindu-Muslim Violence Reconciliation"

Organized by the Center for the Study of Democracy, Toleration, and Religion

Co-sponsored by the Institute for Religion, Culture, and Public Life (IRCPL); the Columbia University Seminar on History, Redress, and Reconciliation; and the South Asia Institute

The 2002 pogrom in Gujurat, India, which resulted in 2,000 - mostly Muslim - casualties was exceptional not only because of its magnitude but also because of its spread to the countryside, where a large number of Muslims were attacked by their Hindu neighbours. After the pogrom, NGOs committed themselves to relief work, judicial assistance and attempts at reconciliating Hindus and Muslims. This workshop will engage NGO activists involved in reconciliation work to share their experience and assess the impact of their efforts. The workshop is part of the ongoing Sacred Sites project, organized by Karen Barkey and Elazar Barkan.

Workshop Schedule

12:00 - 12:30 - Introduction, Elazar Barkan (SIPA Institute for the Study of Human Rights) and Karen Barkey (Sociology)
The Gujarat pogrom, Christophe Jaffrelot (CERI, Sciences Po)

12:30- 2:15 - Panel: Gujarat Living Memory - Civil Society Advocacy in the Last Decade
Youth Development, the Rewriting of History and Conflict Transformation, Vijay Parmar
Post-conflict Reconciliation: Engaging with History, Shabnam Hashmi (Act Now for Democracy and Harmony)
No accountability, no justice? Gujarat ten years after, Christophe Jaffrelot (CERI, Sciences Po)

2:15 - 4:00 - Panel: Sacred sites, violence and coexistence
Is Violence Inevitable: Comparative Perspectives, Karen Barkey (Sociology)
Choreography of Violence, Elazar Barkan (SIPA Institute for the Study of Human Rights)
Syncretism and Coexistence in India, Rajeev Bhargava (Centre for the Study of Developing Societies, Delhi)

Time: 12:00pm - 4:00pm
Location: Third floor, Faculty House, at 64 Morningside Drive (between 116th - 118th Streets)
*Directions to the meeting at Faculty House: http://facultyhouse.columbia.edu/content/contact-us-new-york-event-and-reception-venue#Directions

Wednesday, November 9 - Film Screening
Parzania

Presented by the Center for Democracy, Toleration, and Religion Film Festival

Co-sponsored by the Institute for Religion, Culture, and Public Life (IRCPL); the Columbia University Seminar on History, Redress, and Reconciliation; and the South Asia Institute

Parzania is an award-winning Indian film from 2006 based on the true story of ten-year-old Parsi boy Azhar Mody, who disappeared during the violence in Gujarat. Starring Naseeruddin Shah and Sarikah, Parzania won the Silver Lotus for Best Actress and Golden Lotus for Best Direction at the 2006 Indian National Film Awards.

Time: 6:00pm - 10:00pm
Location: Third floor, Faculty House, at 64 Morningside Drive (between 116th - 118th Streets)
*Directions to the meeting at Faculty House: http://facultyhouse.columbia.edu/content/contact-us-new-york-event-and-reception-venue#Directions

Monday, November 14 - Distinguished Lecturer Series
A talk by Ann Grozins Gold (Syracuse)

"Sweetness and Light: The Bright Side of Pluralism in a Rajasthan Qasba"

Introduction by Jack Hawley (Religion, Barnard College)

Ann Grozins Gold is Thomas J. Watson Professor of Religion and Professor of Anthropology at the Maxwell School at Syracuse University. Gold earned her PhD in Anthropology at the University of Chicago and has been a Visiting Professor at Colgate and Cornell. From 2005-2008, she served as Director of the South Asia Center at Syracuse University. She has received fellowship awards from the American Institute of Indian Studies, Fulbright Foundation, NEH, and the Spencer Foundation.

Her fieldwork in the North Indian state of Rajasthan has included studies of pilgrimage, gender relations, epic tales of world renunciation, and cultural constructions of the environment. Her current research centers on complex intersections of religious values and narratives with biodiversity conservation in the contexts of seed-saving movements and of sacred groves surrounding goddess shrines. Her recent publications include In the Time of Trees and Sorrows: Nature, Power, and Memory in Rajasthan (2002, co-authored with Bhoju Ram Gujar); and the edited volumes Women's Renunciation in South Asia: Nuns, Yoginis, Saints, and Singers (2006, co-edited with Meena Khandelwal and Sondra L. Hausner), and Histories of Intimacy and Situated Ethnography (2010, co-edited with Karen Isaksen Leonard and Gayatri Reddy). .

Time: 5:00pm - 6:30pm
Location: Knox Hall, Room 208, 606 West 122nd Street, between Broadway and Claremont Avenue

Tuesday, November 15 - South Asia Graduate Student Forum
A presentation by Katherine E. Kasdorf (Art History and Archaeology):

"Seeing a City Through its Temples: Halebid and the Hoysala Capital"

AUTHOR ABSTRACT: To judge from most scholarship, one might surmise that South Asian temples are rather isolated structures, architecturally and socially detached from their built environments. Studies typically focus on such factors as architecture, sculptural style, iconography, sectarian affiliation, ritual, and patronage in order to build knowledge about specific temples grouped by region and historical period, or about the communities who made and used these sacred buildings. Examining the temples of Halebid, Karnataka - formerly Dorasamudra, capital of the Hoysala dynasty between the mid-11th and mid-14th centuries - in this paper I build on alternative methodologies of more site-contextualized studies. In the absence of premodern civic and residential architecture, I argue that the temples of a particular locality should be understood not only as architectural entities with various ritual and political purposes, but also as components of a greater urban setting that has historically encompassed a range of activities, communities, and forms. By comparing the temples' architectural and sculptural forms, their sources of patronage, and their sectarian affiliations, and by considering the architectural character of distinct zones and potential routes of access between surviving features, we can understand much about the urban forms and social organization of the Hoysala capital. Furthermore, the alterations made to Halebid's temples and the reuse of Hoysala-period architectural materials in temples built after the dynasty's fall provide insight into the shifting character of the town's neighborhoods and populations. Complicating the familiar narrative of post-Hoysala decline and inactivity, these later constructions attest to the town's continued vibrancy, even after the period of its highest status as a political capital.

Open to all members of the Columbia community. Contact Owen Cornwall (otc2101@columbia.edu) or Andrew Ollett (aso2101@columbia.edu) for further information.

Time: 4:00pm - 5:30pm
Location: Knox Hall, Room 207, 606 West 122nd Street, between Broadway and Claremont Avenue

Thursday, November 17 - Ifriqiyya Lecture Series
A talk by Sugata Bose (Harvard)
"Oceanic Poetry: Tagore and his Times"

Sponsored by the Institute of African Studies

Sugata Bose is Gardiner Professor of Oceanic History and Affairs, History Department, Harvard University. His field of specialization is modern South Asian and Indian Ocean history. Bose earned his PhD at the University of Cambridge, and in 1997, was a Guggenheim Fellow. His publications include His Majesty's Opponent: Subhas Chandra Bose and India's Struggle against Empire (2011); A Hundred Horizons: the Indian Ocean in the Age of Global Empire (2006); and with Ayesha Jalal, Modern South Asia: History, Culture, Political Economy (2004, 2011).

About Ifriqiyya: Ifriqiyya is a study group concerned with the study of Islam in Africa. The word 'Ifriqiya' is a name that Rome gave to its southernmost province (Tunisia), that Ibn Khaldun used to refer to lands to the south, a region that Hegel characterized as 'Africa proper' in contradistinction to 'European Africa' (North Africa) and 'Asiatic Africa' (Egypt, Nubia and Ethiopia). Ifriqiya appropriately highlights the instability of the contemporary designation, Africa, and the debates around it.

Time: 12:00pm - 2:00pm
Location: Knox Hall, Room 207, 606 West 122nd Street, between Broadway and Claremont Avenue

Monday, November 21 - University Seminar
A talk by Tayyab Mahmud (Seattle)

"The Durand Line and the Unending Wars along the Afghanistan-Pakistan Frontier"

ABSTRACT: The Durand Line, the border between Afghanistan and Pakistan and the epicenter of prolonged wars in the region, testifies to the enduring ramifications of colonial cartographies. Colonial rule reordered subjects and spaces. Territorial demarcations of colonial possessions played a pivotal role in this process. Incipient constructs of modern international law, geography, geopolitics, and the frontier, all fashioned in the age of empire, were interwoven in frames that made the drawing of colonial borders like the Durand Line possible. In colonial India, imperatives of colonial rule and compulsions of imperial rivalries positioned this demarcation that cuts across age-old cultural and historical social units, and prompted the establishment of a garrison state in the Punjab. Pakistan inherited colonial demarcations, and intractable security and nation-building dilemmas that issue from the dissonance between the prescribed model of a territorially bounded nation-state and the imprisonment of heterogeneity in territorial straitjackets bequeathed by colonial cartographies. Contested demarcations like the Durand Line facilitated transformation of Pakistan into a praetorian state-nation, and helped turn the region into a critical theater of the Cold War. Today, as global competition for energy resources engulfs Western South Asia the Durant Line will continue to be an epicenter of insecurity and instability.

Tayyab Mahmud joined the faculty of the Seattle University School of Law in 2006, where he is Director of the Center for Global Justice, and was Associate Dean for Research and Faculty Development from 2007-2009. He is a Visiting Research Scholar in the Program in Law and Public Affairs, at the Woodrow Wilson School, Princeton University. He was a Visiting Scholar at Harvard Law School (1997-98); Visiting Professor at Seattle University School of Law, 2003-04; and Professor of Law and Chair, Global Perspectives Group, John Marshall Law School in Chicago (2004-06). Mahmud earned a Ph.D. in Political Science from the University of Hawaii, and a J.D. from the University of California Hastings College of the Law. His legal experience includes working with the California Attorney General, the Los Angeles District Attorney, the San Francisco-based firm Pettit & Martin, and the Pakistan-based firm Walker Martineau Saleem. Mahmud has published extensively in the areas of comparative constitutional law, human rights, international law, legal history and legal theory. His research areas include critical legal theory, colonial legal regimes, international law, and post-colonial legal systems. His current research is focused on extra-constitutional usurpation and exercise of power in post-colonial states.

The talk will be followed by a no-host dinner (about $24) at Faculty House. If you wish to attend the Seminar Dinner following Prof. Mahmud's talk, please RSVP as soon as possible by notifying our substitute rapporteur, Ariel Rubin (email: ajr2112@columbia.edu)

Time: 4:00pm - 5:30pm
Location: Room 1, Faculty House, 64 Morningside Drive (between 116th - 118th Streets)
*Directions to the meeting at Faculty House: http://facultyhouse.columbia.edu/content/contact-us-new-york-event-and-reception-venue#Directions

Tuesday, November 29 - Lecture
A talk by Christophe Jaffrelot (CNRS and Sciences-Po)

"Muslims of India's Cities"

Christophe Jaffrelot is Research Director at Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique and teaches South Asian history and politics at Sciences-Po. Jaffrelot was Director of Centre d'Etudes et de Recherches Internationales at Sciences Po, 2000-08. He has been a Visiting Professor at Columbia, Yale, Princeton, and Johns Hopkins. Jaffrelot is author of India's Silent Revolution: The Rise of the Low Castes in North India (2003); Dr. Ambedkar and Untouchability: Fighting the Indian Caste System (2005); and Religion, Castes and Politics in India (2011). His most recent co-edited volumes are Armed Militias of South Asia: Fundamentalist, Maoists and Separatists (2009) and Rise of the plebeians? The changing face of Indian legislative assemblies (2009).

Time: 4:00pm - 5:30pm
Location: Knox Hall, Room 207, 606 West 122nd Street, between Broadway and Claremont Avenue

Monday, December 5 - Lecture
A talk by Kavita Sivaramakrishnan (Columbia University)

"Coming of Age: The politics of family, aging and social work in a newborn Indian nation"

Kavita Sivaramakrishnan is Assistant Professor, Sociomedical Sciences at the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health. She has been trained in history, political theory and in population health at Cambridge University, Jawaharlal Nehru University and at the Center for Population and Development Studies at Harvard University. She has been a fellow at London University, the Public Health Foundation of India, and the Center for Chronic Disease Control. She is the author of Old Potions, New Bottles: Recasting Indigenous Medicine in Colonial Punjab (2006). Her expertise and interests are in the history of medicine in south Asia, and the politics of 'new' and reemerging pandemics. She is working on a book project that examines the place of Asia in shaping 'global' health interests, in particular the history of global population aging, with a focus on post-colonial Indian public health and welfare debates.

Time: 4:00pm - 5:30pm
Location: Knox Hall, Room 208, 606 West 122nd Street, between Broadway and Claremont Avenue
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