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Calendar of Events: Archive of Events

Spring 2002

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Modern Doubles
Recent efforts in cultural studies to move "beyond dichotomies" may overlook vital links between dichotomy production and the creation of modern subjects. This series of papers links conceptual doubling to questions of agency, experience, and knowledge in the construction of nationalism, scientific disciplines, and colonial modernity.

February 7

'EVEN THE TOOLS WILL BE FREE': SOME HUMANISTIC ORIGINS OF MECHANICAL OBJECTIVITY
John Tresch
Society of Fellows

February 14

NATIONAL HEALTH AND PERSONAL HEALTH: FOOD AND BICORPORALISM IN REPUBLICAN SHANGHAI
Mark Swislocki
Society of Fellows

February 20

"THE PROBLEM OF CONSENSUS"*
Rick Perlstein

February 21

HUCKLEBERRY FINN, RACE AND HISTORY
Candace J. Waid
University of California, Santa Barbara

February 28

'THE ENEMY IS WITHIN': THE UNITED STATES AND ITS SOUTH IN THE ERA OF DECOLONIZATION
Jennifer Greeson
Society of Fellows

'People of the Pen': New Studies in Islamic Manuscripts
This series of papers will showcase recent research in the field of sacred and secular Islamic manuscripts. Each of the four lectures will re-examine well-known manuscript groups from a new perspective in order to suggest solutions to puzzling problems they continue to represent.

March 14

"'BETWEEN MAHFUZ AND MAQRU': DECODING THE PRODUCTION OF EARLY QUR'ANS"
David Roxburgh
Harvard University

April 4

CHASING SHADOWS: TEXT AND IMAGE IN HARIRI'S MAQAMAT
Mark Swislocki
Society of Fellows

April 10

AFTER MEMORY*
Andre Aciman
CUNY Graduate Center

April 11

"ONLY FOOLS AND HORSES. IN THE STEPPES OF MUHAMMAD SIYAH QALAM"
Julian Raby
University of Oxford

* Special event.




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