Tibetan Studies at Columbia

CULTURE & HISTORY COURSES
Spring 2014

4000 Level

20th Century Tibetan History
(East Asian, History W4720; Call Number: 19871; 3 points)

This seminar is designed for students interested in gaining a broad view of Tibetan history in the 20th century. We will cover the institutional history of major Tibetan state institutions and their rivals in the Tibetan borderlands, as well as the relations with China, Britain, and America. Discussion sessions throughout the semester will focus on important historical issues.

Tuesdays from 2:10pm to 4:00pm in Room 522c, Kent Hall
Instructor: Gray W. Tuttle (SIPA #913, gwt2102@columbia.edu)

 

Tibetan Cultures and Societies
(East Asian W4548; Call Number: 08723; 4 points)

This seminar introduces students to major themes and issues in traditional and contemporary Tibetan culture. Key topics include conceptions of sacred landscape, the human body as a microcosm of the universe, and the social order, including contested ideas of regional identity and of ‘Tibet" itself. We examine these themes via Buddhist and non-Buddhist literature, poetry, epic, auto/biographies, traditional histories, medical texts, pilgrimage guides, travelers' accounts, ritual materials, and artistic works, as well as though ethnographies and related studies. There will be several NYC field trips and 4 required films. No language or other prerequisites.

Wednesdays at 11am–12:50pm in Room 227, Milbank Hall (Barnard)
Instructor: Annabella Pitkin (Milbank 317, apitkin@barnard.edu)

 

Biography, Memory and Modern Tibet
(East Asian G4618; Call Number: 60870; 3 points)

A seminar studying modern Tibet through its biographies, autobiographies, testimonies and life-stories. The course involves reading and analyzing texts by officials, intellectuals, lamas, and revolutionaries in translation, studying their influences, and carrying out interviews with Tibetans in the community. Major Cultures Requirement: East Asian Civilization List B only when paired with ASCE V2365 Introduction to East Asian Civilization: Tibet

Mondays 4:10-6:00pm in Room 522c, Kent Hall

No approvals or prerequisites are required for this course.
Instructor: Robert Barnett (SIPA 939, rjb58@columbia.edu)

 

Associated Culture & History Courses

3000 Level

Major Texts: Middle East/India
(East Asian V3399; Call Number: 24702; 4 points)

A colloquium for the study of major texts in Middle East and South Asian traditions, part of Asian Humanities.

Mondays 2:10pm to 4:00pm in CO1, Knox Hall
Instructor: Dominique Townsend (Heyman Center, dt80@columbia.edu)

 

8000 Level

History and Culture of Nomadic Civilization: Nomads of the Eurasian Steppe – From Genghis Khan to Stalin and Beyond
(History G8233; Call Number: 12985; 4 points)

A colloquium that seeks to employ new perspectives in examining the economic, political, cultural, and environmental history of the nomadic steppe populations of Eurasia, which main body lies within the borders of the former Soviet Union. Extended to the east into Mongolia and Northern China and to the west to the Carpathian Mountain range in Central Europe, the Steppe region has played a major role in Eurasian history, although its importance is often overlooked. By connecting east with west via trade routes (the Silk and Tea Roads), it facilitated travel of goods, cultures and ideas between their populations through its inhabitants, the nomadic peoples, who were the main mediators in bringing many innovations to both sides. The course is open to both undergraduate and graduate students.

Fridays 2:10pm to 4:00pm in 302, Fayerweather
Instructor: Gulnar Kendirbai (303 Lewisohn,gk2020@columbia.edu)

 

LANGUAGE COURSES
MODERN TIBETAN

Elementary Modern Tibetan II
(Tibetan G4601; Call Number: 67566; 5 points)

This course introduces students to conversational and basic written skills in modern Tibetan, Lhasa dialect. Students are also introduced to modern Tibetan studies through selected readings and guest lectures.

Mon Tues Wed Thurs 10:10am-11:15pm
Check with instructor for the location
Instructor: Tenzin Norbu Nangsal (SIPA #907a, tn218@columbia.edu)

 

Intermediate Modern Tibetan II
(Tibetan G4604; Call Number: 14200; 3 points)

Introduces students to conversational and basic written skills in modern Tibetan, Lhasa dialect. Students are also introduced to modern Tibetan studies through selected readings and guest lectures.

Two classes per week<
Check with instructor for the times and location of classes
Instructor: Tenzin Norbu Nangsal (SIPA #907a, tn218@columbia.edu)

 

Advanced Modern Tibetan II
(Tibetan G4612; Call Number: 70285; 3 points)

This course introduces students to conversational and basic written skills in modern Tibetan, Lhasa dialect. Students will also be introduced to modern Tibetan studies through selected readings and guest lecturers.

Two classes per week
Check with instructor for the times and location of classes
Instructor: Tenzin Norbu Nangsal (SIPA #907a, tn218@columbia.edu)

 

CLASSICAL TIBETAN

Elementary Classical Tibetan II
(Tibetan W4411; Call Number: 13029; 4 points)

An introduction to Classical Tibetan.

Mondays, Wednesdays 11:00am-12:50pm.
The class meets at Room 352c in the SIPA building
Instructor: Paul Hackett (80 Claremont #103, ph2046@columbia.edu)

 

Intermediate Classical Tibetan II
(Tibetan W4412; Call Number: 19231; 3 points)

Two classes per week
Check with instructor for the times and location of classes
Instructor: Paul Hackett (80 Claremont #103, ph2046@columbia.edu)

 

RELIGION COURSES

Interpreting Buddhist Yoga
(Religion W4018; Call Number: 24332)

How do we interpret yogic reality and the literature describing it? A seminar exploring the 21st Century meanings of Buddhist Tantric Yogic practice, as well as time, music and mortality, through the lenses of Buddhist and Western hermeneutics, digital and analogue.

Thursdays 4:10-6pm, 80 Claremont Ave #201
Instructor: David Kittay (80 Claremont Ave #103, drk2004@columbia.edu)

 

Buddhist Contemplative Sciences
(Religion W4035; Call Number: 83546)

This seminar will explore key Buddhist contemplative sciences, including: stabilizing meditation; analytic insight meditation; the four immeasurables; form and formless trances; mind training; and the subtle body-mind states activated and transformed through advanced Tantric yoga techniques. These will be explored both within their traditional interdisciplinary frameworks, as well as in dialog with related contemporary arts and sciences.

Thursdays 2:10-4pm, 80 Claremont Ave #201
Instructor: Tom Yarnall (ty37@columbia.edu)

 

Research in Religion II
(Religion G9902; Call Number: 92105; 1-6 points)

Prerequisites: Instructor's permission. Guided individual research.
Instructor: Robert Thurman (80 Claremont Ave #308, tbt7@columbia.edu)

 

Guided Reading and Research
(Religion V3902; Call Number72148; 1-4 points)

Independent study. Prerequisites: Instructor's permission.
Instructor: Robert Thurman (80 Claremont Ave #308, tbt7@columbia.edu)