Weatherhead Forum in Taipei

The Weatherhead East Asian Institute at Columbia University is pleased to present a lecture series in partnership with the Center for China Studies at National Taiwan University.

All events are free and open to the public. Please stay tuned for more events.

May 2
(Wednesday)

"Non-Governmental, Person-to-Person Modes of Cross-Strait Interaction, 1987-2012"
Murray Rubinstein, Senior Research Scholar, Weatherhead East Asian Institute, Columbia University
Moderated by Yun-han Chu, Professor of Political Science, National Taiwan University
12:00 PM – 2:00 PM
Second Floor, Administration Building, College of Social Sciences, National Taiwan University
No. 21, Hsu-chow Road, Chung-Cheng District, Taipei, Taiwan

For more information, please click here

June 14
(Thursday)

"Audacious Fraud or Masterful Imitation? Early Twentieth-Century Chinese Copycats and the Global Trademark Regime"
Eugenia Lean, Associate Professor of Modern Chinese History, Columbia University
Moderated by Chang Chia-feng, Associate Professor of History, National Taiwan University
10:30 AM – 12:00 PM
Conference Room, Department of History, Second Floor, College of Liberal Arts, National Taiwan University
No. 21, Hsu-chow Road, Chung-Cheng District, Taipei, Taiwan
Please note, this lecture is in Chinese.
For more information, please click here or contact ntuccs@ntu.edu.tw
Co-sponsored by the Center for China Studies and the Department of History at National Taiwan University

June 14
(Thursday)

"The Stone Phenomenon: Grand Prospect Garden and Its Visual Representations, 1791-1919"
Wei Shang, Du Family Chair of Chinese Culture; de Bary and Class of 1941 Collegiate Professor of Asian Humanities, Columbia University
Moderated by Tsao Shu-chuan, Professor of Chinese Literature, National Taiwan University
3:30 PM – 5:00 PM
Conference Room, Department of Chinese Literature, Second Floor, College of Liberal Arts, National Taiwan University
No. 21, Hsu-chow Road, Chung-Cheng District, Taipei, Taiwan
Please note, this lecture is in Chinese.
For more information, please click here or contact lintm@ntu.edu.tw
Co-sponsored by the Department of Chinese Literature at National Taiwan University

June 15
(Friday)

"How Should We Read Jinpingmei Cihua (The Plum in the Golden Vase)"
Wei Shang, Du Family Chair of Chinese Culture; de Bary and Class of 1941 Collegiate Professor of Asian Humanities, Columbia University
Moderated by Kang Yun-mei, Professor of Chinese Literature, National Taiwan University
10:30 AM – 12:00 PM
Conference Room, Department of Chinese Literature, Second Floor, College of Liberal Arts, National Taiwan University
No. 21, Hsu-chow Road, Chung-Cheng District, Taipei, Taiwan
Please note, this lecture is in Chinese.
For more information, please click here.
Co-sponsored by the Department of Chinese Literature at National Taiwan University

 

 

Speaker Bios

Eugenia Lean offers courses in modern Chinese history, gender, history of science, urban society in China, consumer culture in the modern world, and cultural theory and historical methods.  She is the author of Public Passions: The Trial of Shi Jianqiao and the Rise of Public Sympathy in Republican China (UC Press, 2007), which was awarded the 2007 John K. Fairbank Prize for the best book in modern East Asian history.  Professor Lean is currently research a project titled “Global Soap, Local Desires: Industrial Modernity and Cultural Ambivalence in Modern China,” which focuses on the material object of modern soap to explore the impact of industrialization, science, and commerce on everyday life in modern China.

Murray Rubinstein taught East Asian history at Baruch College of the City University of New York for over thirty years and was a visiting professor at Columbia University teaching on Taiwan history in 2010-2011.  Professor Rubinstein writes on Christianity in China, Chinese popular religion, and on sociopolitical development in both Taiwan and Fujian, China.  His monographs include The Protestant Community on Modern Taiwan and The Origins of the Anglo-American Missionary Enterprise in China, 1807-1840. His edited volumes include The Other Taiwan and Taiwan, 1600-1996.  He is currently finishing work on his upcoming publication "James Klein, General Instrument, and the American Corporate Role in the Taiwan Miracle, 1964-1992" (Columbia University Press) in addition to several articles for Merwin Asia and Routledge.

Wei Shang is a scholar of Chinese literature and cultural history.  One of his ongoing projects is concerned with Jinpingmei cihua (The Plum in the Golden Vase), commercial print culture, and fiction commentary of the Ming and Qing periods.  He is the co-editor of several books including Dynastic Crisis and Cultural Innovation: From the Late Ming to the Late Qing and Beyond (2005).  His forthcoming publications include “The Stone Phenomena and Its Transformation, 1791-1919”; “The Story of the Stone and its Visual Representations, 1791-1919” in Approaches to Teaching The Story of the Stone (Modern Language Association, forthcoming 2012), and Li yu shiba shiji de wenhua zhuanzhe: Rulin waishi yanjiu (Ritual and Cultural transformation in Eighteenth-Century China: A Study of Rulin waishi) forthcoming from Sanlian Shudian, Beijing, in August 2012.

 

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