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The Seventh Multilingual Kalevala Marathon

Wednesday, March 6, 2013 - 5:00pm - 9:00pm
Columbia University Morningside Campus Deutsches Haus

The Finnish Studies program at Columbia University is organizing the seventh Kalevala Marathon on March 6, 2013 to be held at Deutsches Haus, Columbia University.

You are cordially invited to join us for this collective multilingual event of readings, with musical and theatrical performances and audience participation centered around the Kalevala, the Finnish folklore epic.


The Kalevala Marathon a biennial poetry-reading event where people are invited to read or recite passages of the Kalevala in any of the languages it has been translated into. At the moment it has been translated into over sixty languages. The Finnish Studies Program has translations available in the following of them: Arabic, Chinese, Czech, Danish, Dutch, English (in five different translations), Estonian, the Savo dialect of Finnish, French, Georgian, German, Greek (Ancient and Modern), Hebrew, Hindi, Hungarian, Italian, Japanese, Latin, Latvian, Polish, Romanian, Russian, Sanskrit, Serbo-Croatian, Slovene, Spanish, Swahili, Swedish, Tamil, Tulu, Turkish, Ukrainian, Vietnamese and Yiddish.


If you would like to read or recite or sing a brief passage (3 - 4 minutes) in a language of your choice, please let us know, or just drop by and enjoy. Copies of The Kalevala, The Kanteletar and original folk poetry in Finnish and in translation into other languages will be available at the Marathon and beforehand, at Deutsches Haus, Seminar room 1, Columbia University.


Performances by the following artists: Ulla Suokko, bass flute, birchbark flute, kantele, voice; and others to be announced later.


For reservations and further information, contact Tiina Haapakoski, lecturer in Finnish:
tth2109@columbia.edu

Free and open to the public.


Presented by the Finnish Studies Program, Department of Germanic Languages, Columbia University, with support from the Finlandia Foundation NY Metropolitan Chapter and the Finnish Cultural Institute in New York