Ghazal 65, Verse 2x

{65,2x}

rag-e gul jaadah-e taar-e nigah se ;had muvaafiq hai
mile;Nge manzil-e ulfat me;N ham aur ((andaliib aa;xir

1a) the vein of the rose, to/with the path of the thread of the gaze, is supremely similar/analagous
1b) the vein of the rose, like the path of the thread of the gaze, is supremely favorable/suitable

2) we and the Nightingale will meet at the destination/stage of affection, finally

Notes:

;had : 'Boundary, term, limit, bounds, extreme, extremity, extent; ... —a definition; —the point, or verge (of an event), utmost point or degree'. (Platts p.475)

 

muvaafiq : 'Conformable, consonant, congruous, agreeing, according, concordant, suiting, suitable; apt, expedient; like, similar, analogous; prosperous, favourable, propitious;'. (Platts p.1085)

 

ulfat : 'Familiarity, intimacy; attachment, affection, friendship'. (Platts p.76)

Asi:

The 'vein of the rose' is a very, very delicate thread within the leaves of the rose. The poet gives for this the simile of the 'thread of the gaze', and says that the vein of the rose and the path of the thread of the gaze are both finally entirely one. The result of this will be that we and the Nightingale will arrive at the stage of affection and meet, because he is a traveler on the path of the vein of the rose, and the thread of my gaze is just the same kind of path. Thus both must arrive at the very same place. (118)

Zamin:

Perhaps the meaning might be that we and the Nightingale have the very same road, some time or other we will definitely meet. Because the Nightingale, fluttering its wings, takes the rose-vein road to the destination of affection; and the lover has become a melody of ardor and runs along the thread of the glance. In any case, the verse was fit for ignoring, and it was ignored [in choosing divan verses]. ;had muvaafiq = limitlessly favorable/similar. (170)

Gyan Chand:

The vein of the rose has great similitude with the road of the thread of my gaze. I am moving along the thread of the road of the gaze; and the Nightingale, along the road of the vein of the rose. The meaning of this is that finally, at the destination of affection, we will both meet.

== Gyan Chand, p. 208

FWP:

SETS
GAZE: {10,12}
ROAD: {10,12}

For background see S. R. Faruqi's choices. This verse is NOT one of his choices; I thought it was interesting and have added it myself. For more on Ghalib's unpublished verses, see the discussion in {4,8x}.

The word muvaafiq has just the right range of meanings (see the definition above) to generate two distinct possibilities in the first line. By no coincidence, both work elegantly with the second line.

If we take the first line as saying that the 'vein of the rose' and the 'path of the thread of the gaze' are 'similar, analogous' (1a), then it follows naturally that the speaker and the Nightingale would finally meet at the same destination. And if we read se as short for jaise , which is a perfectly colloquial and satisfactory thing to do, then we learn in the first line that the vein of the rose and the path of the thread of the gaze have in common their both being 'favorable, suitable' (1b), so that the speaker and the Nightingale can both be expected to arrive finally at the same desirable destination.

Then, what exactly is this destination of ulfat ? It could mean that the speaker and the Nightingale would both obtain 'familiarity, intimacy, affection' with their beloveds. Or it could mean that they would attain it with each other, as comrades and fellow-travelers along the long and winding road of passion.