Ghazal 145, Verse 7x

{145,7x}

ta;Gaaful-mashrabii se naa-tamaamii baskih paidaa hai
nigaah-e naaz chashm-e yaar me;N zunnaar-e miinaa hai

1) through heedlessness-drinking, {although / to such an extent} incompleteness has arisen

2a) the glance/gaze of coquetry in the beloved's eye is a 'sacred-thread of the wine-flagon'
2b) the 'sacred-thread of the wine-flagon' is a glance/gaze of coquetry in the beloved's eye

Notes:

ta;Gaaful : 'Unmindfulness, heedlessness, forgetfulness, neglect, negligence, inattention, inadvertence, indifference, listlessness'. (Platts p.328)

 

naa-tamaamii : 'Incompleteness; imperfection; deficiency'. (Platts p.1110)

 

miinaa : 'Heaven, paradise; the sky, the azure vault; —a blue colour; ... —a goblet, glass; decanter'. (Platts p.1107)

Zamin:

zunnaar-e miinaa = the line of the wine-flagon, or the 'hair' of the glass.

That is, since the beloved is accustomed to showing heedlessness, her gaze is not usually outside her eye, like the line or 'hair' of the wineglass. The zunnaar-e miinaa he has said only for the wordplay of drinking. There was no occasion for incompleteness. For the line of the wine-flagon not to be separate from the wine-flagon, or for the gaze not to come out of the eye, cannot be a proof of the incompleteness of eye or flagon. (360)

Gyan Chand:

If the bottle [botal] would be half-full and half-empty, then they call the line of the wine the 'sacred-thread of the wine-flagon'. The glances of the heedlessness-practicing beloved too, instead of going out forward, stop inside the eyes-- through which the mood of the 'sacred-thread of the wine-flagon' is created. The 'sacred-thread of the wine-flagon' is a symbol of the bottle's not being full, which is a deficiency. Thus the glance of heedlessness too is, for the beloved's eye, a deficiency.

== Gyan Chand, p. 367

FWP:

SETS == BASKIH; SYMMETRY
GAZE: {10,12}
RELIGIONS: {60,2}
WINE: {49,1}

For background see S. R. Faruqi's choices. For more on Ghalib's unpublished verses, see the discussion in {4,8x}. This verse is from a different, unpublished, formally identical ghazal, {358x}, and is included for comparison. On the presentation of verses from unpublished ghazals like this one along with formally identical divan ghazals, see {145,5x}.

To make grammatical sense of the first line, we need to read ta;Gaaful-mashrabii as, literally, 'heedlessness-drinking', with a sense to be determined by the context; for more on such noun compounds, see {129,6x}. It could mean 'drinking of heedlessness' (parallel to 'wine-drinking'), or 'drinking while in a state of heedlessness' (a state of the drinker's), or 'drinking in a manner full of heedlessness' (a quality of the action of drinking). Mystical possibilities of course arise, as well as images of intoxication and erotic longing.

And then, the second line can be read as either 'A is B' (the glance is a sacred-thread) or 'B is A' (the sacred-thread is a glance). When these possibilities are put together with the convenient doubleness of baskih ('although' or 'to such an extent'), the array of permutations becomes impressive. Here are a few of the most obvious ones:

=Although 'heedlessness-drinking' has created a state of incompleteness, still I am undeterred, and am eager to continue my efforts: the beloved's coquettishly heedless glance that I have been 'drinking in' is like the line that marks a wine-flagon that's still half-full.

=Although my inattentive 'heedlessness-drinking' has created a state of incompleteness, still I am undeterred, and am eager to continue my efforts: the line that marks the wine-flagon as still half-full allures me like the glance of a beloved.

='Heedlessness-drinking' has created such a state of deficiency that it makes me desperate to remedy the lack: the beloved's coquettishly 'heedless' glance that I have been 'drinking in' compels me the way a half-finished flagon of wine, demanding to be finished, compels a drinker.

='Heedlessness-drinking' has created such a state of deficiency that it makes me desperate to remedy the lack: the line of wine in the half-finished wine-flagon is as irresistible as the coquettishly 'heedless' glance of a beloved.

Compare {117,4x}, another verse about the zunnaar-e miinaa; on the zunnaar more generally, see {60,8}.

For more about the complexities of lines on wine-vessels, see {81,6x}.