Ghazal 174, Verse 9

{174,9}

;xi.zr sul:taa;N ko rakhe ;xaaliq-e akbar sar-sabz
shaah ke baa;G me;N yih taazah nihaal achchhaa hai

1) may the Great Creator keep Khizr Sultan green/flourishing
2) in the Shah's garden, this fresh new/young plant is good

Notes:

Nazm:

It is in praise of Khizr Sultan, son of Bahadur Shah Zafar. (196)

== Nazm page 196

Bekhud Dihlavi:

Prince Khizr Sultan was a son of Bahadur Shah Zafar; this verse is in his praise. (253)

Bekhud Mohani:

May the Mighty Lord keep Khizr Sultan happy and thriving, may he flourish well. In the King's garden this small plant (child) is very good. (343)

Arshi:

Khizr Sultan was Zafar’s son and Ghalib’s pupil. He was born in 1831, and on September 23, 1857, was killed by a bullet from Major Hudson. Since this ghazal is from after 1847, this verse should not be understood as connected with the birth of Khizr Sultan. (318)

FWP:

SETS == WORDPLAY

Besides the (rare) personal flattery of two royal patrons, the verse is based entirely on wordplay around ;xi.zr , which means 'green' in Arabic. It of course also evokes Khvajah Khizr, who wears green robes and is associated with water and fertility. In the verse, sar-sabz -- literally 'green-headed'-- and baa;G and taazah and nihaal all echo these associations.

That doesn't make it a very interesting verse, since even minor poets can spin out such sets of associations by the yard. But it makes the verse slightly less mediocre than it would otherwise be-- which isn't saying much. It's easy to see why Ghalib might have recited this verse at court, but I wonder why he bothered to include it in his published divan editions, when he omitted so many much better ones.