Source: Abu'l-Fazl 'Allami, A'IN-I AKBARI (3 vols.). Vol. 1 trans. H. Blochmann, 1927. Vol. 1, pp. 15-16. Ed. *ZDJ*


Book 1, Chapter 3: The Treasury for Precious Stones

If I were to speak about the quantity and quality of the stones it would take me an age. I shall therefore give a few particulars, "gathering an ear from every sheaf."

His Majesty appointed for this office an intelligent, trustworthy, clever treasurer, and as his assistants, an experienced clerk, a zealous darogha, and also skilful jewellers. The foundation therefore of this important department rests upon those four pillars. They classified the jewels, and thus removed the rust of confusion.

Rubies.-1st class rubies, not less than 1000 muhrs in value; 2nd class, from 999 to 500 muhrs; 3rd class, from 499 to 300; 4th class, from 299 to 200; 5th class, from 199 to 100; 6th class, from 99 to 60; 7th class, from 59 to 40; 8th class, from 39 to 30; 9th class, from 29 to 10; 10th class, from 9.75 to 5; 11th class, from 4.75 to 1 muhr; 12th class, from .75 muhr to .25 rupee. They made no account of rubies of less value.

Diamonds, emeralds, and the red and blue yaquts, were classified as follows: 1st class, from 30 muhrs upwards; 2nd class, from 29.75 to 15 muhrs; 3rd class, from 14.75 to 12; 4th class, from 11.75 to 10; 5th class, from 9.75 to 7; 6th class, from 6.75 to 5 ; 7th class, from 4.75 to 3; 8th class, from 2.75 to 2; 9th class, from 1.75 to 1 muhr; 10th class, from 8.75 rupees to 5 rupees; 11th class, from 4.75 to 2 rupees; 12th class, from 1.75 to .25 rupee.

The Pearls were divided into 16 classes, and strung by scores. The first string contained twenty pearls, each of a value of 30 muhrs and upwards; 2nd class pearls varied from 29.75 to 15 muhrs; 3rd class, from 14.75 to 12; 4th class, from 11.75 to 10; 5th class, from 9.75 to 7; 6th class, from 6.75 to 5; 7th class, from 4.75 to 3; 8th class, from 2.75 to 2; 9th class, from 1.75 to 1; 10th class, less than a muhr, down to 5 rupees; 11th class, less than 5, to 2 rupees; 12th class, less than 2 rupees, to 1.25 rupees; 13th class, less than 1.25 rupees, to 30 dams; 14th class, less than 30 dams, to 20 dams; 15th class, less than 20 dams, to 10 dams; 16th class, less than 10 dams, to 5 dams. The pearls are strung upon a number of strings indicating their class, so that those of the 16th class are strung upon 16 strings. At the end of each bundle of strings the imperial seal is affixed, to avoid losses arising from unsorting, whilst a description is attached to each pearl, to prevent disorder.

The following are the charges for boring pearls, independent of the daily and monthly wages of the workmen. For a pearl of the 1st class, .25 rupee ; 2nd class, 1/8 rupee; 3rd class, 1/10 rupee; 4th class, 3 dams; 5th class, 1 suki; 6th class, 1 dam; 7th class, .75 dam; 8th class, .5 dams; 9th class, .25 dams; 10th class, .2 dams; 11th class, 1/6 dams; 12th class, 1/7 dams; 13th class, 1/8 dam; 14th class, 1/9 dam; 15th class, 1/10 dam; 16th class, 1/11 dam, and less.

The value of jewels is so well known that it is useless to say anything about it; but those which are at present in the treasury of his Majesty may be detailed as follows:

Rubies weighing 11 tanks, 20 surkhs, and diamonds of 5.25 tanks, 4 surkhs, each one lakh of rupees; emeralds weighing 17.75 tanks, 3 surkhs, 52,000 rupees; yaquts of 4 tanks, 7.75 surkhs, and pearls of 5 tanks, each 50,000 rupees.


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