FOLK NARRATIVE


=PANCHATANTRA: in Arthur Ryder's trans. (1925): [on this site]
=PANCHATANTRA: some excerpts: [site]

=PANCHATANTRA: THE TORTOISE AND THE GEESE AND OTHER FABLES OF BIDPAI, by Maude Barrows Dutton (1908): [site]

=HITOPADESHA (date uncertain), in a slightly abridged trans. by Sir Edwin Arnold (1861): [on this site]

=JATAKA TALES, by Ellen C. Babbitt (1912): [site]; and
=MORE JATAKA TALES by her (1922): [site]
=EASTERN STORIES AND LEGENDS by Marie L. Shedlock (1920), a retelling of some of Rhys Davids' Jataka tales: [site]

=AESOP'S FABLES in various translations: [site]; another site: [site]

=TWENTY-TWO GOBLINS in the translation by Arthur W. Ryder (1917): [site] ; another location: [site]; also through Project Gutenberg: [site]

=DASAKUMARACHARITAM (late 11th c.?): Hindu Tales, or the Adventures of Ten Princes, trans. by P. W. Jacobs, 1873: [site]

=KATHASARITSAGARA by Somadeva (11th c.), in the Tawney trans. (1880): [site]

=Ziya ud-din Nakhshabi (d.1350), Tuti-namah (Story of the Parrot) (1330), a Persian adaptation of the Shuka-saptati, later revised by Abu'l-Fazl, and again by Muhammad Qadiri: [site]; Packard Humanities Institute: [site]

=Shaikh Inayat-ullah Kanbu (d.1671), Bahar-i danish (Springtime of Knowledge) (1651), an free adaptation of the Shuka-saptati into Persian: [site]; Packard Humanities Institute: [site]

=BAITAL PACHCHISI (The Twenty-five Tales of the Vampire, 1802), a Fort William College work presented here in Hindi, Urdu, and the English translation by John Platts (1871): [on this site]
=VIKRAM AND THE VAMPIRE, eleven of the Baital tales translated by Richard Burton (1870): [site]; also [site]

=BAGH O BAHAR, or the TALE OF THE FOUR DERVISHES, by Mir Amman Dihlavi (1804), trans. by Duncan Forbes (1874): [on this site]

=HINDU TALES FROM THE SANSKRIT, by S. M. Mitra and Nancy Bell Mitra (1919):  [site]

=INDIAN FABLES, by Ramaswami Raju (London, Sonnenschein, nd): [site]

=INDIAN FAIRY TALES, by Joseph Jacobs: [site]

=A GROUP OF EASTERN ROMANCES, mostly from Persian, including 'Gul-e Bakavali' from Urdu, translated by William Alexander Clouston (1843-96): [site]

=KALILA WA DIMNA (retold as Anvar-i Suhaili, the Lights of Canopus), by Husain Va'iz al-Kashifi, trans. by Edward B. Eastwick (1854): [site]

=TALES OF THE SUN, South Indian folktales trans. and ed. by Mrs. Howard Kingscote and Pandit Natesa Sastri,1890: [site]

=QISSAH-I HATIM TAI, trans. from the Persian by Duncan Forbes (3rd ed., 1911): [site]

=OLD DECCAN DAYS, by Mary Frere, 1868: [site]

=INDIAN FAIRY TALES, by Maive Stokes, 1880: [site]

=DECCAN NURSERY TALES, by C. A. Kincaid, 1914: [site]

=TALES OF THE PUNJAB, by Flora Annie Steel, 1894: [site]; also [site]. For comparison, see also her ENGLISH FAIRY TALES, 1918: [site]

=TALES OF BENGAL, by S. P. Banerjea [early 1900's]: [site]

=FOLKLORE OF THE SANTAL PARGANAS, by Cecil Henry Bompas, 1909: [site]

=INDIAN FAIRY TALES by Joseph Jacobs, 1912: [site]

=FOLK-TALES OF THE KHASIS, by K. U. Rafi, 1920: [site]

=A FLOWERING TREE AND OTHER ORAL TALES FROM INDIA, by A. K. Ramanujan, 1997: [site]

=A CARNIVAL OF PARTING: The Tales of King Bharthari and King Gopi Chand As Sung and Told by Madhu Natisar Nath of Ghatiyali, Rajasthan, trans. by Ann Grodzins Gold (Berkeley: Univ. of California Press, 1992). An example of real, unexpurgated North Indian (Rajasthani) oral storytelling: [site].

=RELIGION AND RAJPUT WOMEN: The Ethic of Protection in Contemporary Narratives, by Lindsey Harlan (1992): [site]. An interpretive study of some kinds of modern Rajasthani folk narrative.

=THE EPIC OF PABUJI, a Rajasthani oral tale cycle: [site]

="SHRI BADAT THE CANNIBAL KING: A Buddhist Jataka from Gilgit," by John Mock: [site]

=LISTEN TO THE HERON'S WORDS: Reimagining Gender and Kinship in North India, by Gloria Goodwin Raheja and Ann Grodzins Gold (1994): [site]. An interpretive study of the uses of folklore materials.

=AKBAR-BIRBAL JOKES: some unpublished translations by FWP: [on this site]

=DASTAN-E AMIR HAMZAH (1871) by Abdullah Bilgrami, abridged and translated by FWP from the Urdu, with much background material: [on this site]

=MARVELOUS ENCOUNTERS: FOLK ROMANCE IN URDU AND HINDI (1985), FWP's dissertation: [on this site]

=ARABIAN NIGHTS
    The Arabian Nights, trans. by Richard Francis Burton, Project Gutenberg: [site] and many following volumes
    Fairy Tales from the Arabian Nights, by E. Dixon: [site]
    The Arabian Nights Entertainments, trans. by Andrew Lang, Project Gutenberg: [site]
    The Book of the Thousand Nights and One Night, trans. by John Payne: [vol.1]; [vol.2]; [vol.3]; [vol.4]
    The Arabian Nights' Entertainment, trans. by Jonathan Scott, 1890: [vol.1]; [vol.2]; [vol.3]; [vol.4]
    The Arabian Nights Entertainment, by Anon., illustrated, 1914: [site]
 

=THOUSAND AND ONE DAYS (Persian traditional tales), attrib. to Muhli, McCarthy ed. (1892): [site]; Packard Humanities Institute: [site]

=SONG AND LEGEND FROM THE MIDDLE AGES, William D. McClintock and Porter Lander McClintock, eds (1893): a free public book on NetLibrary [site]; also Project Gutenberg [site]. European material, for comparison. 

="LALLA ROOKH" (1817), a long poem by Sir Thomas Moore: once extremely popular, this amply-footnoted "Eastern Romance" is based on a frame story involving a daughter of Aurangzeb: [on this site]; it offers much cheerful commentary about storytelling

=FAIRY TALES OF HANS CHRISTIAN ANDERSEN (1835-): [site]

=GRIMM'S FAIRY TALES: [site]

=STORIES OF KING ARTHUR AND HIS KNIGHTS, by U. Waldo Cutler (1905): [site]

=SPEAK, BIRD, SPEAK AGAIN: Palestinian Arab Folktales, Ibrahim Muhawi and Sharif Kanaana (1989): [site]

=MANY MORE ONLINE BOOKS for comparative folklore study: [site]

="ORAL TRADITION," a journal about folk narrative etc.: [site]

="FOLKLORE AND MYTHOLOGY: ELECTRONIC TEXTS," a valuable site by Prof. D. L. Ashliman: [site]


 
 

 
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