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Convert WP Files to Word or PDF Format


The WPtoWord converter | The WPLO ConverterThe WPtoDOCX converter | A Windows script that uses Word to convert WP to DOCXA Windows script that uses Word to convert to RTF | A standalone script that uses LibreOffice to convert WP to DOC | Frequently-asked questionHome page


This page is about standalone utility programs and Windows scripts that convert WordPerfect files into Word or PDF format. These programs do not require WordPerfect to be installed on your system. A separate page is devoted to WordPerfect macros that can also be used to convert WP files into RTF, DOC, DOCX, and PDF formats. 

The vDosWP and DOSBoxWP systems both include WP macros that convert WP files to Word and PDF format. You may not need these separate utilities if you use those systems.

Note: A different page provides information on the reverse  conversion: converting Microsoft Word files into WordPerfect for DOS formats.

For other methods of creating PDF files directly from WPDOS, see a separate page about "printing" PDF files from WPDOS. The methods on that page will produce more accurate results than the methods described on the page you are reading now, because the methods on the other page "print" a PDF file directly from WordPerfect instead of using Microsoft Word or LibreOffice to convert the file first.

The WPLO Converter application does not require Microsoft Word to be installed on your system.

The WPtoWord converter and the WPtoDOCX converter both require Microsoft Word to be installed on your system. The WPtoWord Converter requires Word 2007 or later; the WPtoDOCX converter requires Word 2003 or later.

The two Windows scripts that convert WP files to DOCX or RTF formats, WP2MSW.VBS and WP2RTF.VBS, both require Microsoft Word 2003 or later to be installed on your system.

The script that uses LibreOffice to convert WP files to DOC format, WP-LO.VBS, requires LibreOffice to be installed on your system, but you will get better results with the standalone WPLO Converter utility, which does not require a separate copy of Libre Office to be installed on your system.


The WPtoWord converter

This site provides a WPtoWord.exe application that produces the best available results when converting WP documents in DOCX (Word 2007) or later. It requires Word 2007 or later on your system, but it does not use (and therefore does not require) WordPerfect, and works equally well whether or not WPDOS is installed. It may be used to convert one or more WP documents into DOCX format.

Download WPtoWord.exe and move it to any convenient directory. You may use it in two different ways: either drop one or more WPs file on the application (or a shortcut to it) or run the application and select a WP file when prompted. The application will create DOCX-format files with the same name as the original, but with a .DOCX extension added. Of course your original file will not be changed in any way. (If the original file has a .WPD extension, the converted output file will have only a .DOCX extension, not both.) The converted file will open in Word when the conversion is complete.

The converter uses Word's conversion filters - the best available - for converting WP files to DOCX format. Since these filters produce best results when opening WPDOS 5.1 files, the converter uses Corel's old DOS-based ConvertPerfect application to convert WPDOS 6.x files into 5.1 format before opening them in Word.

Word's conversions are not perfect. If you want Word to run a macro that automatically makes formatting or other changes in imported WP files, record such a macro and name it WPtoWordMacro. The converter will automatically run any macro with that name when it converts a WP file.

If you rename the application to include the string "PDF" in the filename (e.g. WPtoWordPDF.exe), it will create a PDF file, not a DOCX file. The converted file will open in your system's default PDF viewer.

if you rename the application to include the string "silent" in its name, then it will not open the converted document and give no visible indication that the conversion is complete. If you rename it to include "ask" in its name, it will prompt you before opening the converted file.

You may use one or more command-line parameters when running this file from the Windows command prompt, or you may add one or more paramaters to the Program field in a Windows shortcut. The parameter "pdf" will cause the application to output PDF files. The parameter "silent" will prevent the application from opening the converted file.

Word may not succeed in opening large or complicated WP files. If the application reports that Word could not open a file, try a different converter from the choices on this page.


The WPLO Converter

The WPLO Converter uses a reduced copy of LibreOffice to convert WP files into DOC or PDF formats; the resulting file will automatically open in your default application for DOC files or PDF files. The results will not be as satisfactory as those produced by the WPtoWord converter described above, but the WPLO Converter has this advantage: unlike the WPtoWord converter, it does not require Word (or LibreOffice) to be installed on your system.

One advantage of the WPLO Converter is that it converts WP files created by WordPerfect for the Macintosh 3.x and 3.5e as well as files created by WPDOS 5.x and 6.x in addition to files created by any version of WordPerfect for Windows.

Download and run the WPLO Converter Setup installer. It will install the WPLO Converter program and (optionally) create a desktop shortcut for it. Then either drop one or more WordPerfect files on the WPLO Converter desktop shortcut (or on the application itself) to produce a DOC file in the same folder with the original file, or double-click on the application or its shortcut and select a file. Alternatively, run the application from the Windows command prompt, with the name of a WP file as a command-line parameter.

The installer offers the option of creating a second desktop shortcut that will create PDF files instead of DOC files. You can also make the program create PDF files by adding the string "PDF" to the name of the application itself (e.g., something like WPLO PDF Converter.exe) or by using "PDF" as a command-line parameter when launching the program (you can use a filename and "PDF" as a parameter in any order).

You can prevent the application from automatically opening a converted output file by adding the string "silent" to the name of the application; or you can cause it to prompt you before opening an output file by adding the string "ask" to the name of the application. You can also use "silent" as a command-line parameter to prevent the output file from opening.

Note: If you drop a Word or other document file (instead of a WP file) on the converter, it will convert in the reverse direction, creating a WP document. This procedure is documented on a separate page.


The WPtoDOCX converter

This site provides a WPtoDOCX.exe application that effectively converts WP documents into DOCX (Word 2007 and later) format. It requires Word 2003 or later on your system, but it does not use (and therefore does not require) WordPerfect, and works equally well whether or not WPDOS is installed. In general, it produces different and less effective results than the WPtoWord converter described above, but may be preferable with some WP documents. Unlike some other methods on this page, this application converts only one document at a time, not multiple documents.

Download WPtoDOCX.exe and move it to any convenient directory. You may use it in two different ways: either drop a WP file on the application (or a shortcut to it) or run the application and select a WP file when prompted. The application will create a DOCX-format file with the same name as the original, but with a .DOCX extension added. Of course your original file will not be changed in any way. (If the original file has a .WPD extension, the converted output file will have only a .DOCX extension, not both.)

If Word 2003 is installed on your system, instead of Word 2007 or later, the converted file will be in .DOC format and have a .DOC extension.

This application uses the old Word for Word conversion filters to convert from WP to RTF format, and then uses the open-source DocTo.exe to automate a conversion from RTF to DOCX format; the DocTo.exe program uses your installed copy of Word to perform the actual conversion.

An alternate version of this application uses the old ConvertPerfect program (instead of Word for Word) to perform the initial conversion from WP to RTF format. The results will probably be less satisfactory than the Word-for-Word-based conversion, but you may want to experiment with both programs to see which works best with your documents. For this alternate version, download WPtoDOCX-CV.exe.


A standalone script that uses Microsoft Word to convert to DOC or PDF

In order to use this script, you must have Microsoft Word installed on your system.

The script is available via this link to WP2MSW.VBS (right-click and choose Save Link Location or Download Link, or some similar item). Save the script in any convenient location.

Before proceeding, you may want to make a desktop shortcut of the WP2MSW.VBS script file that you installed when you followed the instructions above, although this step is not essential. (See Help! What's a shortcut? and read the instructions for creating a shortcut for any Windows program or any other file.)

If you have the WordPerfect for Windows fonts installed on your system, and, after using the script to convert a file, you find that you cannot search for apostrophes and dashes in converted files, that means that Word has used WPTypographicSymbols and other WP fonts instead of standard Windows fonts. This can only cause trouble. You can prevent Word from using WP fonts in a number of ways:

You can open the script file in Windows Notepad or any similar text editor and edit its many options. These options let you suppress some of the prompts that the script ordinarily offers; whether to use .DOC or .PDF as the default output; and whether and how to use advanced font-substitution and formatting options.

You may run this script either by double-clicking on its icon, by dropping a file or folder on its icon, or by running it from the Start/Run... command line in Windows. Follow the specific instructions below:

Double-click the script's icon or shortcut. The script will prompt you to enter a filename, a directory name, or a wildcard specification (for example C:\myfiles\wp*.*). The script will then open Word (invisibly), import the matching files into Word, and export copies of the files in Word format. By default, the exported output files will have the same name as the input files, but with a .DOC extension; this .DOC extension will be added to any existing filename extension that the original file already had.

Drop a WP file or a folder icon on the script's icon or shortcut. In Windows Explorer, click on a WP file or on a folder that contains WP files, and drop the file or folder on the script's icon or shortcut. The script will export copies of the files to Word format. By default, the exported output files will have the same name as the input files, but with a .DOC extension.

Run the script from the command line. This is by far the most powerful option. The script can be run with up to four command-line parameters. These parameters let you specify the output filename (when the script converts a single file) or the output folder; they also let you specify DOC or PDF output, whether or not the script runs "silently" (without prompts), and whether it also processes subdirectories when you specify a folder of files for conversions. For details of these options, open the script in Windows Notepad or a similar text editor and study the instructions found in the script.

Remember that your original WPDOS files are not changed in this process and remain on your disk with their original names!


A standalone script that uses Microsoft Word to convert to RTF or PDF

In order to use this script, you must have Microsoft Word installed on your system. If you want to use WP macros so that you can use this script from inside WPDOS, you may try to modify the macros described elsewhere on this page for converting from WP to DOC format. If you want me to create the macros for you, be prepared to make a very large contribution to this site.

The script to convert WP to RTF documents is available via this link to WP2RTF.VBS (right-click and choose Save Link Location or Download Link, or some similar item.) After downloading WP2RTF.VBS, copy or move the file to a convenient location on your hard drive. Remember where it is. You may want to make a desktop shortcut of the script file, although this step is not essential. (See Help! What's a shortcut? and read the instructions for creating a shortcut for any Windows program or any other file.)

You can open the script file in Windows Notepad or any similar text editor and edit its many options. These options let you suppress some of the prompts that the script ordinarily offers; including whether and how to use advanced font-substitution and formatting options.

You may run this script either by double-clicking on its icon, by dropping a file or folder on its icon, or by running it from the Start/Run... command line in Windows. Follow the specific instructions below:

Double-click the script's icon or shortcut. The script will prompt you to enter a filename, a directory name, or a wildcard specification (for example C:\myfiles\wp*.*). The script will then open Word (invisibly), import the matching files into Word, and export copies of the files in RTF format. By default, the exported output files will have the same name as the input files, but with a .RTF extension; this .RTF extension will be added to any existing filename extension that the original file already had.

Drop a WP file or a folder icon on the script's icon or shortcut. In Windows Explorer, click on a WP file or on a folder that contains WP files, and drop the file or folder on the script's icon or shortcut. The script will export copies of the files to Word format. By default, the exported output files will have the same name as the input files, but with a .RTF extension.

Run the script from the command line. This is by far the most powerful option. The script can be run with up to four command-line parameters. These parameters let you specify the output filename (when the script converts a single file) or the output folder; they also let you specify whether to export to .RTF or .PDF format, and whether or not the script runs "silently" (without prompts), and whether it also processes subdirectories when you specify a folder of files for conversions. For details of these options, open the script in Windows Notepad or a similar text editor and study the instructions found in the script.

If you have a 64-bit version of Windows: Open the WP2RTF.VBS script file in Windows Notepad or some other text editor. Search for the line that reads DisableWPFonts (approx. line 202). Comment out this line by adding a straight apostrophe (') at the start of the line so that it reads: 'DisableWPFonts and save the file. If, after using the script to convert a file, you find that you cannot search for apostrophes and dashes in converted files, then you have the WPTypographicSymbols and other WP fonts installed in your system; remove them from your Windows Fonts folder (you almost certainly do not need them), and run the script again. If you absolutely need to have the WPTypographicSymbols font on your system, and you have 64-bit Windows, use some other method of converting WP files to RTF format.

Remember that your original WPDOS files are not changed in this process and remain on your disk with their original names!


A standalone script that uses LibreOffice to convert to DOC or PDF

To use this method, you must have a recent version of LibreOffice installed on your system. The script was revised on 9 December 2012 to work correctly with recent versions of LibreOffice.

The script (without the accompanying macros) is available via this link; download it to any convenient location.

Note: Before proceeding, you may want to make a desktop shortcut for the WP-LO.VBS script file that you installed when you followed the instructions above, although this step is not essential. (See Help! What's a shortcut? and read the instructions for creating a shortcut for any Windows program or any other file.)

You can open the script file in Windows Notepad or any similar text editor and edit its options. These include options to default to PDF instead of DOC output, and to suppress some of the prompts that the program normally offers.

You may run this script either by by dropping a file on its icon or by running it from the Start/Run... command line.

Drop a WP file on the WP-LO.VBS script's icon or shortcut. In Windows Explorer, drag a WP file and drop it on the script's icon or shortcut. The script will export a copy of the file to Word format. By default, the exported output file will have the same name as the input file, but with a .DOC extension. (But this can be changed by changing in an option in the script itself.)

Run the WP-LO.VBS script from the command line. This is the more flexible option. The script can be run with one or two command-line parameters. The first parameter specifies the input WP file. The optional second parameter specifies the output filename; you can specify a filename with the extension .PDF or .DOC and the script will create a file with the desired format. Alternatively, you can use simply PDF or DOC as the second parameter, and the script will export a file with the same name as the input file but with a .PDF or .DOC extension added.

For details of these options, open the script in Windows Notepad or a similar text editor and study the instructions found in the script.

Remember that your original WPDOS files are not changed in this process and remain on your disk with their original names!


Frequently-asked question

Q. I was stupid enough to download and use your programs and scripts, and the results aren't as good as I wanted. You have destroyed my files! The fonts are all wrong! The formatting is wrong! Everything is a total disaster! Word uses fonts with weird names like Shruti or Uighur instead of the fonts I carefully chose in WordPerfect! I lost all the work I did over the last fifteen years! This is all your fault!
   A. Breathe deeply, make an effort to stay calm, and read the following sentences very slowly until you are absolutely sure that you understand them - and I mean really understand them. First, your original WordPerfect files have not been changed at all. They are still on your disk, exactly where they have always been, with exactly the same content and format that they have always had, and exactly the same names. You are complaining about the mistakes that Microsoft Word, and only Microsoft Word, made when creating copies of your original files in a different format. Remember, it was Microsoft Word and only Microsoft Word that decided which fonts to use in the exported files that it created! My script includes features that let you fix the problems caused by Word, by specifying in the script the fonts that Word should use when converting your file. But you will need to calm yourself and read the instructions in the script file before you can use these features. Also, please complain to Microsoft about the bugs and limitations of its file converters. It does you no good to complain to me.


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