Haruo Shirane Faculty Profile

 

BIBLIOGRAPHIC GUIDE TO JAPANESE LITERATURE

PART VII
ENCYCLOPEDIAS

 


JAPANESE ENCYCLOPEDIAS

Koji ruien. Call no.: 031 H79.
Compiled by Hosokawa Junjirō and other. 60 volumes. Japanese encyclopedia compiled in Meiji period and completed in 1914. This is the 1930s reprint edition.       

Kōbunko
広文庫. By Mozume Takami. 20 volumes. 1928 printing by Kōbunko Kankōkai. Call no.: REF AE35.2M69 1916.
Encyclopedia work done by the author of the Gunsho sakuin.        

Dai Nihon hyakka jiten
(Encyclopedia Japonica).  23 vols.  Shôgakkan, 1972‑1973. Call no.: AE 35.2 D3. Fukuda: A84.        

Nihon daihyakka zensho
(Encyclopedia Nipponica).  25 vols.  Shôgakkan, 1984‑89.    

Heibonsha Daihyakka jiten
.  16 vols.  Heibonsha, 1984‑85. Call no.: AE 35.2 .D24 1984. IHJ: 1001; Fukuda: A83.
The 1972‑73 Shôgakkan work is superseded now by the new revised edition of 1984‑1989, but the CV Starr Library has decided to go rather with Heibonsha. In the older Shôgakkan work, all major articles are signed, and helpful bibliographic references are appended to many articles. In comparison to the new Heibonsha work, the text is less encumbered with references to names of works, authors, and dates, so it is generally easier to use for quick reference.        

Sekai Daihyakka Jiten
.  35 vols.  Heibonsha, 1988. Call no.: AE 35.2 .S4 1988.
The Heibonsha is generally acknowledged to be the most comprehensive and up‑to‑date encyclopedia in the Japanese language.  The two Heibonsha encyclopedias listed are basically the same work. Both editions also have a comprehensive index in both wabun and ôbun. The ôbun index is particularly useful as a reference for the proper transliteration of European language names, places, etc. into Japanese, while the wabun index may be used to trace katakana designations back into their original languages. One additional feature of the 1989 edition is an index to color plates.            

Super Nipponica Light Edition. Shôgakukan. CD rom. This features the Nihon daihyakka zensho (Shôgakukan), the 1989 revised version, plus the Kokugo daijiten (Shôgakukan), a condensed version of the ten volume Kokugo daijiten (without all the examples). For a student of literature or history, this is a marvelous combination since you go to an entry in the encyclopedia and click on any word for a reference to either the encyclopedia or the dictionary instantaneously. Another feature that is very useful is the printout and the copy feature, which allows the user to create a computer file from any entry. The entries have furigana on names and difficult kanji, making this useful for students.

Sekai daihyakkan jiten, nenkan, benran, chizu. Hitachi-Heibonsha. CD rom. This features the second edition of the Seikai daihyakkakan jiten by Heibonsha, plus many other features, including chronologies and maps. The comprehensiveness of the entries make this an indispensable computer tool. As with the Super Nipponica, each entry comes with many links to related topics, which are extremely helpful. The Sekai daikyakkan jiten is far more comprehensive than the Super Nipponica, but it does not use furigana and is not linked to a comprehensive dictionary as the Super Nipponica is.

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INTRODUCTION

PART I
MULTI-VOLUME COMPENDIA OF JAPANESE LITERATURE


PART II
MODERN SCHOLARSHIP


PART III
LITERATURE DICTIONARIES


PART IV
LANGUAGE DICTIONARIES


PART V
CHRONOLOGICAL TABLES AND LITERARY HISTORY


PART VI
ENGLISH REFERENCE AND TRANSLATION


PART VII
ENCYCLOPEDIAS


PART VIII
MISCELLANEOUS


PART IX


PART X


PART XI


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