1918 - 1993 * A BRIEF HISTORY

OF THE FOREIGN PRESS ASSOCIATION


Roy Murphy


Editor Roy Murphy
Photographic Editor Joseph Aranha
History Committee Roy Murphy, Joseph Aranha, John Fercsey,Mitja Mersol
The original book was designed by Roy Murphy and set in 11 point Times New Roman TrueType and published in 1993 by the
Foreign Press Association
110 East 59th Street, 2nd Floor
New York, NY 10022-1304
We would like to dedicate this special private electronic edition of the book to all of present and past FPA members, whose support, dedication and journalistic achievements have helped to make the 75th anniversary in 1993 a special one.
Producer and editor of this 2001 private electronic edition: Josef Schrabal
Several (old) photographs were improved, other photos were added.

The first electronic edition was produced in 1995 by Josef Schrabal with help of Roy Murphy and Josef Aranha. - The second 1999 private electronic edition was produced by Josef Schrabal

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

The idea of a “progression through the years” for the cover originally came from Joseph Aranha's wife Marisilis. After much discussion with Bill Stricker and others, the final design was produced in full color with the help of Duggal Color Printing.


FPA President Roy Murphy (right) with
"Nick" (Nicholas) King, Director of the
FPC, USIA (photo J. Schrabal)

 

This book was made possible in part by the generosity of the advertisers: Duggal Color Printing, Eastman Kodak and BASF Corporation. Baldev Duggal of Duggal Color Printing also kindly donated the full-color covers of the Brief History and the Directory of Members 1993.

We also note with sadness the untimely passing of Nicholas King, the Director of the USIA Foreign Press Center in New York, on December 9, 1992. Mr King served foreign correspondents since his appointment on July 1, 1981 with style and intelligence, and always with a touch of acerbic wit. Although a political appointee of the Republican Administration, there was no hint of partisanship in his dealings with journalists. His presence and advice is missed by the FPA.

Photo credits are due on pages 14 and 15 for the photos of: Balaraman, Charlotte Kahler; Blyth, Joseph Aranha; Bueno, Charlotte Kahler; Levin, Kathryn Millan; Murphy, Joseph Aranha; Steinitz, Fred Stein; and Tetlow, Laurie Gardos. * Photo: M. S. Essaka lli

LIFE MEMBERS

(In alphabetical order): Krishna Balaraman, Jeffrey Blyth, Guy Bueno, John Cappelli, Gianni Capra, Monsignor J. Patrick Carroll-Abbing, Alec Leonard Collett, David Horowitz, Jerry Levin, Roy Murphy, Elena F. Nielsen, Gastone Orefice, Renato M. Pachetti, I sabelle Silk, Hans Steinitz, William Stricker, Edwin Tetlow, Fred Vaz Dias, Alfred von Krusenstiern, Elie Wiesel

DISTINGUISHED MEMBERS

We are proud to record that amongst our members we number two Nobel Prize winners: Czeslaw Milosz, a poet who won the prize for Literature in 1980, and Elie Wiesel, who won the Peace Prize in 1986.

Czeslaw Milosz

Milosz is a regular contributor to the Polish publications Kultura in Paris, Tygodnik Powszechny Magazine in Poland and Dziennik Polski in London. Born in Lithuania in 1911, Milosz was educated in independent Poland in the 1920s and 1930s. His first work was published in the 1930s when he became one of the leaders of the avant-garde poetry movement in Poland. During the Nazi occupation, underground editions of his writing were published in Warsaw. Milosz served as a cultural attaché at Polish embassies in Washington and Paris, but asked for asylum in Paris in 1951 and went into exile. He has been Professor of Slavic Languages and Literatures at the University of California at Berkeley since 1961. Literature historian Joseph Brodsky says Milosz is “one of the greatest poets of our time . . . perhaps the greatest.”
Photo: Czeslaw Czaplinski

Elie Wiesel

Wiesel, whose photo appears amongst our Life Members on page 15, has been a member of the FPA since 1956 when he came to New York to report on the United Nations for the Tel Aviv daily Yediot Achronot. Born in Romania and educated in France, Wiesel became a victim of Nazi persecution during the Second World War. He was held in Auschwitz concentration camp where his mother and sister died in the gas chambers. Then he was sent to Buchenwald where his father perished. Wiesel is said to have been the first to use the term “holocaust” to describe the killing of six million Jews by the Nazis.
Wiesel has spoken out on behalf of other groups, including South Africa's blacks, the boat people of Indochina, the Meskite Indians of Nicaragua, and Argentine political prisoners. The FPA elected Wiesel a Life Member in 1985 in recognition of his wor k, and the following year he was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.
His biographer, Robert McAfee Brown, describes Wiesel as “a messenger for all humanity” whose “themes touch all of us.”

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