Public Perception of Climate Change and the New Climate Dice

<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><>

Figure in Author Summary Published in Print

Figure P1. Frequency of occurence (y-axis) of local temperature anomalies divided by local standard deviation (x-axis) obtained by binning all local results for the indicated region and 11-year period into 0.05 frequency intervals. Area under each curve isunity. Standard deviations are for the 1951-1980 period.
In PDF. (Last modified: 2012/02/07)

Data for part A, part B, part C, part D.
Only part A in PDF.

<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><>

Figure in GISS Popular Science Page [for NH Land]

A.

In PDF: All 4, (Last modified: 2012/08/03)

D.


In PDF: All 4, 1951-1980, 1981-1991, 1991-2001, 2001-2011. (Last modified: 2012/08/03)

<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><>

Updates of Figures Published in PNAS Plus On-Line

Now we use GHCN v3.3.0 and ERSST v4, but our updates will be mostly forcused over the land and ERSST doesn't matter.

Figure 1. Jun-Jul-Aug surface temperature anomalies in the middle year of six 11-year periods in 1950-2015 and the past six years relative to 1951-1980 mean. Number on upper right is the global mean (average over all area with data).
(Last modified: 2015/08/30)

Figure 1 but Dec-Jan-Feb. (Last modified: 2015/08/30)

Figure 2 Simplified. Standard deviation of local Jun-Jul-Aug (left) and Dec-Jan-Feb (right) mean surface temperature for 30-year-period 1951-1980. (Last modified: 2015/08/29)

Figure 2, but for NH and SH land only. (Last modified: 2015/08/29)

Figure 3. Jun-Jul-Aug surface temperature anomalies in units of the local 1951-1980 standard deviation. Numbers above each map are percent of surface area covered by each category in the color bar.

Figure 3. but for Dec-Jan-Feb.
(Last modified: 2015/08/30)

Figure 6.
(Last modified: 2015/08/30)

Figure 6 but Dec-Jan-Feb.
(Last modified: 2015/08/30)

Figure 6 but S. Hemisphere.
(Last modified: 2015/08/31)

Figure 6 but Dec-Jan-Feb in S. Hemisphere.
(Last modified: 2015/08/31)

Figure 4. Frequency of occurence (y-axis) of local temperature anomalies (relative to 1951-1980 mean) divided by local standard deviations (x-axis) obtained by counting how many gridboxes have anomalies within each 0.05 interval over 11-year periods. Area under each curve is unity.
In PDF. (Last modified: 2011/12/31)

Figure 5. Area covered by temperature anomalies in the categories defined as hot (> 0.43σ), very hot (> 2σ), and extremely hot (> 3σ) with analogous divisions for cold anomalies. Anomalies are relative to 1951-1980 climatology, with σ also from 1951-1980 data. Lowest row is Southern Hemisphere summer.
(Last modified: 2012/01/26)

Figure 7. Percent area covered by temperature anomalies categpries defined as hot (> 0.43σ), very hot (> 2σ), and extremely hot (> 3σ). Anomalies are relative to 1951-1980 climatology; σ is from 1951-1980 data, but results are similar for the alternative choices in Figure 2.
In PDF. (Last modified: 2012/01/26)

Figure 8. Jun-Jul-Aug and Dec-Jan-Feb temperature anomalies (°C) for area shown on the right.
In PDF. (Last modified: 2011/10/18)

Figure 9. Frequency of occurrence (y-axis) of local temperature anomalies divided by local standard deviation (x-axis) obtained by binning all local results for 11-year periods into 0.05 frequency intervals. Area under each curve is unity. Standard deviations are for the indicated base periods.
In PDF. (Last modified: 2012/01/19)

Figure 9 but only for the base periods and 2001-2011.
In PDF. (Last modified: 2012/07/31)

Figure S1. Jun-Jul-Aug surface temperature anomalies in 1931, 1934, 1936, 1941, 1947, 1953. Number on upper right is the global mean (average over all area with data).
In PDF. (Last modified: 2012/03/26)

Figure S2. Jun-Jul-Aug surface temperature anomalies over land in 1931, 1934, 1936, 1941, 1947, 1953 relative to 1951-1980 mean temperature in unit of the local 1951-1980 standard deviation of temperature. Numbers above each map are the percent of surface area covered by each category in the color bar. Figure in PDF. (Last modified: 2012/03/26)

<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><>

With 1931-1980 for the anomaly base period and standard deviation calculations

With GHCN-M version 2 used in PNAS paper, Fig. 1 (Jun-Jul-Aug), Fig. 1 (Dec-Jan-Feb) (2012/08/08)

With GHCN-M version 3 which we should use from now, Fig. 1 (Jun-Jul-Aug), Fig. 1 (Dec-Jan-Feb) (2012/08/07)

-----------------------------------------------------

With GHCN-M version 2 used in PNAS paper, Fig.2 (2012/08/08)

With GHCN-M version 3 which we should use from now, Fig.2 (2012/08/09)

-----------------------------------------------------

With GHCN-M version 3 which we should use from now, Fig.6 (2012/08/09)

-----------------------------------------------------

With GHCN-M version 3 which we should use from now, Colored Bell Curves.

<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><>

Extra Figures not Shown in the Paper

In the U.S. and the northern part of Eurasia the winters were very cold in the late 1970s. We should check how large portions were with < -3σ.

Dec-Jan-Feb, 1977-1979. (Last modified: 2012/03/20)

Dec-Jan-Feb, 1977-1979. (Last modified: 2012/03/20)

(Last modified: 2012/03/20)

(Last modified: 2012/03/20)

(Last modified: 2012/03/20)

The results show that although there were regions with T < -4C, there was not much area with < -3σ because standard deviations were large in winter, ~2C in the very cold regions and these regions sum up negligible when we look at the whole NH land.

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Regional Summer Temperature in Longer Time Period

The work below was done more recently with GHCN v3, so you may see slight difference from Fig. 8, but it won't change our basic results.

PDF The middle row shows the temperature anomalies in °C, and the bottom row shows the temperature anomalies in the units of the local 1951-1980 standard deviations. Data through 2011. Updated on 2012/03/23