Outlining a Philosophy Paper Prepared for TF 4081

This handout was originally prepared for a paper writing workshop in which students constructed a philosophical argument for or against the position that teachers should be required to take a philosophy of education course. You may find the skeletal outline to be a helpful guide in outlining your philosophy paper. This is, of course, only one suggested approach; there are other ways to tackle a philosophy paper. You should keep in mind, though, that any philosophy paper should have the following:

 

Outline

1. Introduction

a) the question that drives the paper (i.e., should teachers be required to study phil. of .ed?)

b) the position that the paper will take on the question

c) how the paper will argue that position

2. Background information (this could also be covered in the introduction)

a) defining terms: e.g., what do we mean by "philosophy of education?"

b) parameters: e.g. who do we think should/should not be required to take a course? when?

c) justification: why is the question of whether a teacher takes a philosophy of education course important?

3. First reason why teachers should/should not have to take a philosophy of education course

a) your reason

b) support from other philosophers for that reason

c) anticipated objections

d) refutation of objections

e) transition to the next point

4. Second reason why teachers should/should not have to take a philosophy of education course

a) your second reason

b) support from other philosophers for that reason

c) anticipated objections

d) refutation of objections

e) transition to the next point

5. Third reason why teachers should/should not have to take a philosophy of education course

a) reason

b) support from other philosophers for that reason

c) anticipated objections

d) refutation of objections

6. Conclusion