Updated November 26, 2014

Courses for Biotechnology MA Students

Here is a list of required and pre-approved elective courses.  Even though our program will accept courses in the list to fulfill degree requirements, it does not mean that you automatically qualify to take them. Check with the professor and the department offering the courses to see if you meet the pre-requisites set forth by them.  Courses availability and time are tentative and will be updated as information becomes available. Always check Directory of Classes for official listing of actual offering time and location.

 

Elective Keys

 

 

Core Biotechnology Courses (Required, 9 points)
  F     BIOL
W4034
3

MW

4:10-5:25

Biotechnology. D. Kalderon and L. Chasin
Prerequisite: genetics or molecular biology. Techniques currently used to explore and manipulate gene function. Topics include characterization of biochemical activities of gene products in vitro and in heterologous cells, and investigation of gene function in model genetic organisms and in humans. Study of human genetic disease is emphasized.  
  F     BIOL
W4300
3 MW
2:40-3:55
Drugs and Disease.  L. Yamasaki
The molecular basis of human diseases will be discussed with an emphasis on novel therapeutic approaches. The course will include a combination of lectures and discussion or original research articles. Prerequisites: Four semesters of biology including a foundation in molecular and cellular biology. web site
v Sp     BIOL
G4305
3 W
2:10-4
Seminar in Biotechnology. L. Yamasaki
A weekly seminar and discussion course focusing on the most recent development in biotechnology.  Professionals of the pharmaceutical, biotechnology and related industries will be invited to present and lead discussions.  Prerequisites: W4300 web site

 

Laboratory (minimum 6 points)
  F     BIOL
G4260
3

T
9:10-12:15

Proteomics Laboratory. L. Brown
The course is open to students in M.A. in Biotechnology Program (points can be counted against laboratory requirement for that program), Ph.D. and advanced undergraduate students with background in genetics or molecular biology.  Students should be comfortable with basic biotechnology laboratory techniques as well as being interested in doing computational work in a Windows environment.  This course deals with the proteome: the expressed protein complement of a cell, organelle, matrix, tissue, organ or organism. The study of the proteome (proteomics) is broadly applicable to life sciences research, and is increasingly important in academic, government and industrial research through extension of the impact of advances in genomics. These techniques are being applied to basic research, exploratory studies of cancer and other diseases, drug discovery and many other topics. Techniques of mass spectrometry relating to proteomics will be covered.  Emphasis will be on mastery of practical techniques of  Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption and Ionization (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry and database searching for identification of proteins separated by gel electrophoresis as well as background tutorials and exercises covering other techniques used in descriptive and comparative proteomics.  Practice in the analysis of liquid chromatography/ mass spectrometry (LC/MS) data for protein identification will also be included.  Lab Fee: $150. 

Course Aims This class will provide hands-on experience in MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry and computational biology for protein identification.  The aim of the course is to enable students to achieve a level of mastery of these techniques through example lab exercises, tutorial lectures and practice. The expected outcome of the course would be mastery of a discrete skill set that would allow a student to identify proteins using these techniques. There will also be exposure through demonstration and lecture/tutorial to a wide range of other proteomic strategies and hardware including other mass spectrometers and strategies in comparative proteomics. Students should expect to spend lab time doing mass spectrometry and a significant amount of computational analysis of data as well as some "wet lab" work (sample preparation).

Prerequisites Permission of instructor; please contact by email. Students should bring a Windows laptop computer to some classes. Any student who does not have the required computer may contact the instructor for special arrangements to be made.

  Su     BIOL
G4310
6 MTWR
9-2
Summer Intensive Laboratory in Biotechnology. L. Yamasaki
Intended for those without prior lab experience. Intense laboratory exercise where students meet 4 days a week for eight weeks in the summer, participating in experimental design, bench work, and data analysis.  Grades depend on participation in the laboratory, reports, and practical exams.  Class starts immediately following Spring final exams.  web site

 

v


F
Sp
Su
    BIOL
G4500
G4501
S4502
S4503
2-6   Supervised Research. L.Yamasaki
Students conduct research related to biotechnology under the sponsorship of a mentor within or outside the University. Credits received from this course may be used to fulfill the laboratory requirement for the degree.  Students may work on a significant research problem related to their professional needs. The student and the mentor determine the nature and extent of this independent study. In some laboratories, the student may be assigned to work with a postdoctoral fellow, graduate student or a senior member of the laboratory, who is in turn supervised by the mentor. The mentor is responsible for mentoring and evaluating the student’s progress and performance. web site
  Sp     CHEN
E4760
3 M
1:30-4:30
Genomics Sequencing Laboratory. J. Ju
Prerequisites: Undergraduate level biology, organic chemistry and instructor's permission. The chemical, biological and engineering principles involved in the genomics sequencing process will be illustrated throughout the course for engineering students to develop the hands-on skills in conducting genomics research.
  F     BMEN
E6500
4 F
1:10-5:25
Tissue and Molecular Engineering Laboratory. C. Jacobs
Hands on experiment in molecular and cellular techniques, including fabrication of living engineered tissues. Covers sterile technique, culture of mammalian cells, microscopy, basic subcloning and gel electrophoresis, creation of cell-seeded scaffolds, and the effects of mechanical loading on the metabolism of living cells or tissues.

 

Electives (minimum 15 points)
Traditional Track: 9 or more points from category A (). The remainder can be from category A () or category B ().

Entrepreneurship Track: 6 or more points from category A (). The remainder from category A () or category B ().

 

Biological Sciences (bulletin listing)
  F  

BIOL

W4001

3

T

1:10-3:55

Advanced Genetic Analysis. M. Chalfie

Prerequisites: For undergrads:Introductory Genetics (W3031)and permission of the instructor. This seminar course provides a detailed presentation of areas in classical and molecular genetics for advanced undergraduates and beginning graduate students. Topics include transmission genetics, gain and loss of function mutations, genetic redundancy, suppressors, enhancers, epistasis, expression patterns, using transposons, and genome analysis. The course is a mixture of lectures, student presentations, seminar discussions, and readings from the original literature. Undergraduates wishing to take the course need to have taken Genetics W3031 or its equivalent and received the instructor's permission. Enrollment is limited to 25 students.
  F   BIOL
W4004
4 TR
4:10-5:25
Cellular and Molecular Neurobiology. S. Firestein.
Recitation: hours to be arranged. Prerequisite: one year of biology, and a course in physics is highly recommended. An introduction to the cellular and molecular aspects of nerve cell function. Topics include the cell biology and biochemistry of nerve cells, ionic and molecular bases of electrical signals, synaptic transmission and its modulation, and sensory receptors. Recitation emphasizes readings from the primary literature. 
v Sp   BIOL
W4005
4 TR
4:10-5:25
Systems Neurobiology.  R. Yuste 
Recitation: hours to be arranged. Prerequisite: one year of biology or instructor's permission. An introduction to the development and properties of ensembles of neurons, particularly the vertebrate central nervous system (CNS). Topics include CNS organization and development, parallel and serial processing in sensory and motor systems, modulation of neural activity by hormones and neurotransmitters, and neuroethology. Major emphasis is placed on readings from the primary literature.  web site
  Sp   BIOL
W4008
3

TR
5:40-6:55

The Cellular Physiology of Disease. J. Fernandez
This course will present a quantitative description of the cellular physiology of excitable cells (mostly nerve and muscle).  While the course will focus on examining basic mechanisms in cell physiology, there will be a thread of discussion of disease mechanisms throughout.  The end of each lecture will include a discussion of the molecular mechanisms of selected diseases that relate to the topics covered in the lecture.  The course will consist of two lectures per week.  This course will be of interest to advanced (3000-4000 level) undergraduates that aim to pursue careers in medicine as well as those that will pursue careers in biomedical research. This course will also be of interest to graduate students desiring an introduction to the cellular physiology of nerve and muscle. 

 

 

F   BIOL
W4011
3 F
9- 11
Neural System - Circuits in the Brain.  R. Yuste  
This course will review current knowledge about the computation carried out by different microcircuits in the mammalian CNS. The levels of analysis covered by the course will span channel behavior, synaptic physiology, dendritic integration, neuro anatomy, and circuit studies.
  F   BIOL
G4013
3 W
4:10-6

Advanced Seminar in Neurobiology. J. Yang
Sensory systems provide a window on the brain. From the primary events of signal transduction to the organization of receptive fields and higher order processing, the senses utilize mechanisms that are shared by all neural systems. This seminar stresses the general principles of signalling and the common neurobiological motifs typified in sensory systems. Results emerging from biophysical, molecular, physiological, and computational approaches are treated, utilizing both the current literature and classic papers in the field. 

Prerequisites: one year of introductory biology and W3004/W4004 "Cellular and Molecular Neurobiology" (or equivalent). Students will read and discuss classical as well as contemporary research papers on membrane excitability, ion channels and transporters, synaptic transmission and plasticity, and sensory receptors.  Focus will be on intellectual creativity, conceptual breakthroughs and technical advances.  A key goal of this course is to help students become a critical reader and thinker. 

  F   BIOL
W4022
3 TR
1:10-2:25
Developmental Biology.  A. Heicklen
Prerequisites:  BIOL C2005-C2006 or equivalent An introduction to developmental biology stressing the molecular mechanisms controlling development. Topics include sex determination, imprinting, X-chromosome inactivation, gametogenesis, stem cells, cloning, fertilization, the Pill, early development, and aging.
v Sp  

BIOL
W4028

new!

3 W
4:10-7

Computer Models in Biology. J. Fernandez
Prerequisites:Calculus, Cell Biology (or a strong intro class), PChem desirable but not required, or permission from the instructor.  Some computer programming desirable, but is neither required nor essential.    This course is intended to introduce students in the biological and physical sciences to techniques in computer programming and the modeling of biological systems.

v Sp   BIOL
W4031
3 TR
10:10-11:25

Genetics. A. Brent
Optional one-hour problem session to be arranged. Prerequisite: BIOL C2005-C2006 or the equivalent. Recommended requisite: one term of organic chemistry. A general course in genetics dealing with principles of gene structure, function, and transmission. The historical development and experimental basis of current knowledge are stressed.

v Sp   BIOL
G4035
3 T
2:10-4:00
Seminar in Epigenetics. S. Jia 
This is a combined lecture/seminar course designed for advanced undergraduates and graduate students. The focus is on understanding the mechanisms underlying epigenetic phenomena: he heritable inheritance of genetic states without change in DNA sequence. Epigenetic mechanisms play important roles during normal animal development and oncogenesis. It is an area under intensive scientific investigation and the course will focus on recent advances in understanding these phenomena. In each class, students will present and discuss in detail recent papers and background material concerning each individual topic, followed by an introductory lecture on the following week’s topic. This course will emphasize critical analysis of the scientific literature and help students understand how to identify important biological problems and how to address them experimentally. Prerequisites: Genetics or Molecular Biology, and the permission of the instructor.
  F   BIOL
W4041
3 TR
10:10-11:25
Cell Biology. E. Miller  
Prerequisite: one year of biology, normally BIOL C2005-C2006, or the equivalent. Recommended preparation or core requisite: organic chemistry and rudimentary physics. An introduction to cell biology stressing the relations of cell structure to physiology, biochemistry, and heredity, and the experimental and observational basis of current views of the cell. 
  Sp   BIOL
G4044
3 R
4:10-6
Advanced Topics in Cell Biology.  J. Bulinski
Advanced Topics in Cell Biology is a graduate course, primarily enrolling Ph.D. students, but also enrolling advanced M.A. students and undergraduates with consent of one of the instructors. This year’s offering will concentrate on the basic cell biology of signal transduction and its readouts within the cytoskeleton and its activities inside the cell. Students will read the literature and give presentations. Topics include the pathways by which cells respond to extracellular signals such as growth factors and cell-cell contact, and the mechanisms by which extracellular signals are translated into alterations in the cell cycle, morphology, differentiation state, and motility of the responding cell. 
  F   BIOL
G4045
3 W
4:10-6
Seminar in Cell Biology. E. Miller
Prerequisites: Cell Biology (3041/4041) and the permission of the instructor.
This is a combined lecture/seminar course designed for advanced undergraduates and graduate students. The focus is on understanding how infectious microbes manipulate host cell processes to multiply and evade immune detection. In each class, an introductory lecture will provide a summary of the biology of the organism under discussion and historical findings that have improved our understanding of host/pathogen interactions. Students will then present and discuss in detail recent papers and background material concerning specific aspects of microbial infection and the host response.
  Sp   BIOL
W4070
3

W
4:10
-7

Biology and Physics of Single Molecules.  J. Fernandez and  M. Sheetz
This course will examine the fundamental mechanisms underlying the behavior of biological molecules, at the single molecule level. The course will cover the methods used to track single molecules: optical tweezers, single molecule AFM, Magnetic tweezers, Optical techniques and Fluorescence energy transfer (FRET) probes. The course will cover the mechanism of action of mechanical motors such as myosin dyneyin, kinesin. It will cover the action of DNA binding enzymes such as topoisomerases, helicases, etc. We will also discuss the function of large motors such as the ATP Synthase and the bacterial AAA ATPases. We will discuss the mechanical properties of DNA, RNA, and proteins. The course will consist mainly of reviewing classical experiments in each category, and developing the background physical theories to promote a deep understanding of biological mechanisms at the mesoscopic level.  
  Sp  

BIOL

W4075

3

R 4:10 - 6

 

Biology at Physical Extremes. Ozgur Sahin

Prerequisites: One year each of biology and physics, or permission from the instructor. This is a combined lecture/seminar course designed for graduate students and advanced undergraduates. The course will cover a series of cases where biological systems take advantage of physical phenomena in counter intuitive and surprising ways to accomplish their functions. In each of these cases, we will discuss different physical mechanisms at work. We will limit our discussions to simple, qualitative arguments. We will also discuss experimental methods enabling the study of these biological systems. Overall, the course will expose students to a wide range of physical concepts involved in biological processes.

 

 

F

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

BIOL
W4077

 

 

3

 

 

TR
1:10-2:25

 

Survey in Molecular & Cellular Biology: Cellular Stress Responses. R. Prywes
Prerequisites: One year of introductory biology and at least one semester of additional biology courses, recommended: BIOL W3041 Cell Biology, BIOL C3512 Molecular Biology This is an advanced molecular and cellular biology course geared to upper level undergraduates and M.A. students. The topic of this year will be cellular stress responses. We will read and analyze a series of reviews on this topic ranging from the stress of DNA damage on cells to metabolic stress to the stress of aging. We will also read key research articles on these topics. The signaling pathways, mechanisms, targets and biological relevance will be reviewed. An emphasis will be made on understanding how important discoveries were made. Students will develop their own review articles on related subjects and present multiple research proposals.  

v Sp  

BIOL
W4082

new!

4 TR
11:40-12:55

Theoretical Foundations and Applications of Biophysical Methods. J. Hunt

Prerequisites: At least one year of coursework in single-variable calculus and not being freaked-out by multivariable calculus. Physics coursework through a calculus-based treatment of classical mechanics and electromagnetism. One year of general chemistry (either AP chemistry or a college course). One year of college coursework in molecular/cellular biology and biochemistry equivalent to Biology C2005-2006 at Columbia. Rigorous introduction to the theory underlying biophysical methods, which are illustrated by practical applications to biomedical research. Emphasizes the approach used by physical chemists to understand and analyze the behavior of molecules, while also preparing students to apply these methods in their own research. Course modules cover: (i) statistical analysis of data; (ii) solution thermodynamics; (iii) hydrodynamic methods; (iv) light-scattering methods; & (v) spectroscopic methods, especially fluorescence. Recitations focus on curve-fitting analyses of experimental data.

  F   BIOL
G4095
2 TR
2:40-3:55
Chemical Genomics. B. Stockwell
First half of semester (September - mid October).  In this course, we will cover subject matter in chemical biology and genomics. We will discuss approaches for discovering and optimizing chemical tools for measuring and perturbing biological systems. Topics covered will include high-throughput assay development, chemical and genomic screening, chemical library creation, high-throughput chemistry, affinity purification of target proteins and target validation, protein microarrays and the druggable genome. The course is intended to provide a foundation needed for advanced chemical biology and genomic research, i.e. the creation and use of chemical and genomic probes of biological processes. The course will be of interest to students at the interface between chemistry and biology, and students interested in medicine, academic chemical biology and drug discovery efforts. Prerequisites: One year of college-level biology and one year of organic chemistry, or the instructor's permission. Advanced undergraduate students are encouraged to enroll, and they will be given extra assistance in preparing the research proposal (no prior experience in writing proposals is needed).  
v Sp   BIOT
G4140
3   Fundamentals of the Bioscience Industry. L. Yamasaki
Open only to students in the MA Program in Biotechnology. This course requires competitive application to a certificate program and additional tuitions (portion reimbursed by the Biotech Program) payable to New York State's Center for Biotechnology.
 

 

 

 

 

 

BIOL
W4150

 

 

3

 

MW
4-5:20

 

Biology The Cell as a Machine: Cell Biophysics and Biosystems Engineering. M. Sheetz
Focuses on a topical area of molecular genetics. Current problems and research in nucleic acids, protein synthesis, mechanisms of regulating the synthesis of macromolecules, and control of genetic activity in chromosomes.   All potential participants must show up on the first day as that is when we organize the topics and seminar assignments. Each student is to give a seminar on a particular aspect of this subject. 

v Sp  

BIOT
W4160

new!

 

W

6:10-8

Biotechnology Law. A. J. Morrison

The term “biotechnology law” is used here to mean a collection of distinct areas of law that play a prominent role in the biotech industry.  There are many legal disciplines having at least some nexus with this industry, and they include such diverse specialties as corporate law, securities law, real estate law, employment law, tax law and healthcare law. 

          However, this course features the interrelated areas of intellectual property law, regulatory law and contract law, with a particular emphasis on patent law.  Patents and related agreements have become critical resources for universities and research institutes.  Similarly, patents, patent-related agreements and regulatory filings are the sine qua non of biopharmaceutical companies.  This course is designed to arm students with an understanding of these fields so that, during their biotech careers, they can productively work with counsel to manage their organization’s patent portfolio and litigations, negotiate and draft development and license agreements, and oversee regulatory affairs.  Since other courses in the Biotechnology MA Program thoroughly address biotech regulatory affairs, this course addresses only selected regulatory topics germane to patent protection, licensing, generic drugs and biosimilars.  

          The biotech, pharmaceutical and diagnostic sectors will be the course’s industrial focal point.  The course therefore requires familiarity with the science underlying these subjects.

          Lectures will include ample discussion time to reinforce concepts taught and ensure that lingering questions are dealt with immediately and in sufficient detail. 

v Sp   BIOC
G4170
4.5

TF
4:25-5:40 

Biophysical Chemistry. R. Gonzalez
Prerequisite: elementary physical and organic chemistry. Recommended preparation: elementary biochemistry. Tactics and techniques for the study of large molecules of biological importance; analysis of the conformation of proteins and nucleic acids, hydrodynamic, scattering, and spectroscopic techniques for examining macromolecular structure Includes laboratory exercises in molecular computer graphics and in structural biological and chemical informatics.
  F   BIOT
W4180
3

F
9-10:50

Entrepreneurship in Biotechnology. D. Sable
Success in biotechnology requires a combination of scientific expertise and knowledge of the unique business characteristics of biotechnology companies. Unlike most entrepreneurial ventures, biotechnology companies need to sustain themselves for as long as ten or more years prior to generating sufficient revenues to become self-sustaining.

This course is directed towards advanced students in biotechnology, other sciences or engineering. Its specific objectives are:

  • To familiarize students with the scope of issues and decisions that managers in biotechnology face as their companies progress from their earliest stages to self-sustainability, and give students the vocabulary to participate and contribute to the business side of scientific enterprises.
  • To provide a procedural road map for biotechnology students who are interested in starting their own companies.
  Sp  

BIOL

W4193

3 TBA

Stem Cell Biology and Applications. D. Kalderon

Corequisites: Three semesters of Biology or Instructor’s permission. The course examines current knowledge and potential medical applications of pluripotent stem cells (embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells), direct conversions between cell types and adult, tissue-specific stem cells (concentrating mainly on hematopoietic and gut stem cells as leading paradigms). A basic lecture format will be supplemented by presentations and discussions of research papers. Recent reviews and research papers together with extensive instructor notes will be used in place of a textbook.

  F   BIOT
W4200
3 R
4:10-6
Biopharmaceutical Development and Regulation. R. Guido
The course aims to provide current life sciences students with an understanding of what drives the regulatory strategies that surround the development decision making process, and how the regulatory professional may best contribute to the goals of product development and approval.  To effect this we will examine operational, strategic and commercial aspects of the regulatory approval process for new drug, biologic and biotechnology products both in the United States and worldwide.  The topics are designed to provide a chronological review of the requirements needed to obtain marketing approval.  Regulatory strategic, operational, and marketing considerations will be addressed throughout the course. We will examine and analyze the regulatory process as a product candidates are advanced from Research and Development, through pre-clinical and clinical testing, to marketing approval, product launch and the post-marketing phase.  The goal of this course is to introduce and familiarize students with the terminology, timelines and actual steps followed by Regulatory Affairs professionals employed in the pharmaceutical or biotechnology industry. Worked examples will be explored to illustrate complex topics and illustrate interpretation of regulations. 
v Sp   BIOT
W4201
3 R
4:10-6

Seminar in Biotechnology Development and Regulation. R. Guido
This course will provide a practical definition of the current role of the Regulatory Professional in pharmaceutical development, approval and post-approval actions. This will be illustrated by exploration, and interactive discussion of regulatory history, its evolution, current standards and associated processes. The course will seek to clarify the role of Regulatory in development and lifecycle opportunities, demonstrating the value Regulatory adds by participation on research, development and commercial teams. The course will utilize weekly case studies and guest lecturers to provide color to current topical events related to the areas. Prerequisite: BIOT W4200.
v Sp   BIOL
W4310

3 MW
4:10-5:25
Virology. V. Racaniello
Prerequisites: Two semesters of a rigorous, molecularly-oriented introductory biology course (such as C2005), or the instructor's permission. The course will emphasize the common reactions that must be completed by all viruses for successful reproduction within a host cell and survival and spread within a host population. The molecular basis of alternative reproductive cycles, the interactions of viruses with host organisms, and how these lead to disease are presented with examples drawn from a set of representative animal and human viruses, although selected bacterial viruses will be discussed. The Friday session each week will comprise discussion of original research papers in virology.
  F   BIOL
W4400
TR
1:10-2:25

Biological Networks.  D. Pe'Er
This is an advanced computational biology course and contains a strong computational and mathematical component.  There are no official prerequisites, but students should be ready for fast paced learning of computational and statistical methods, as well as some programming assignments in matlab.  The course will be easier for those who have taken a previous computational biology or machine learning course.

     The course will start with an introduction to types of biological networks and many of the new high throughput and quantitative technologies now available. We will start with the mathematical and computational analysis of small networks in order to understand some of the basic principles in biological networks including network motifs, modularity, robustness and stochasticity. The course will then scale up to much larger networks teaching the computation techniques needed to address these including Hidden Markov Models, Bayesian networks, FDR, Bootstrapping, Expectation Maximization, Inference, Gibbs Sampling, Monte Carlo and Belief Propagation. We cover many of the pitfalls of high throughput data and how to over come these, proper modeling choices when building large scale models of molecular networks and how to apply the techniques learned to real data. We will learn how to reconstruct regulatory networks from such data and understand how these networks compute, dynamically change and the connections between genetic sequence and these molecular regulatory networks. Finally will demonstrate how the Bayesian techniques learned in the course can be applied to other biological networks such as a network of interacting neurons.

  F   BIOC
W4501
4 TR
2:40-3:55 
Biochemistry I: Structure and Metabolism. B. Stockwell
Recitation: one hour to be arranged. Students wishing to cover the full range of modern biochemistry should take both BIOC W4501 and W4512. Prerequisites: BIOL W2001 or C2005 and one year of organic chemistry. Protein structure, protein folding, enzyme kinetics, allostery, membrane transport, biological membranes, and protein targeting. Chemistry and metabolism of amino acids, carbohydrates, lipids, purines, and pyrimidines.  Not for students taking or have taken Biochemistry G4021 
v Sp   CHBC
W4510
4

M
2:40-5:25

Genomics of Gene Regulation.  H. Bussemaker
Prerequisites: One year of Biology and one year of Chemistry (AP in High School and/or at Columbia) or permission from the instructor. This year-long, four-credits per semester, course will present a quantitative description of the molecular networks that underlie the myriad phenotypes in living cells. Topics covered include various high-throughput technologies (genome sequencing, DNA microarrays, proteomics, and phenotypic drug screening), transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulatory networks, synthetic biology, and neural networks. These will be integrated with introductory lectures on molecular and structural biology, thermodynamics, statistics, and machine learning. This course will be of interest to advanced undergraduates as well as beginning graduate students in Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Engineering, and Computer Science. It is unapologetically quantitative, interdisciplinary, and rooted in the latest research areas with a soft focus on cancer. The course is taught by research scientists active in the various areas that integrate systems biology: from detecting and manipulating single molecules all the way up to the computational synthesis of molecular networks. In addition to the lectures on Tuesdays and Thursdays there will be weekly tutorials designed to clarify the material of the lectures. 
  Sp   CHBC
W4511
4 TR
1:10-2:25
Molecular Systems Biology II.  R. Gonzalez
See above.
v Sp   BIOC
W4512
3 MW
2:40-3:55
Molecular Biology. J. Manley and J. Punt
Prerequisites: one year of biology and one year of organic chemistry. Recommended but not required: BIOC W4501. Nucleic acid structure and enzymology; DNA replication, DNA repair, and transcription; RNA processing and translation; biochemical approach to the study of gene expression and regulation, with emphasis on the diseases caused when these basic processes are altered.  Not for students taking or have taken Biochemistry G4026 
v Sp   BIOL
W4799
3 TR
2:40-3:55
Molecular Biology of Cancer. C. Prives and L. Yamasaki
Prerequisite: three terms of biology (genetics and cell biology recommended). Lectures and discussion. Readings tracing the discovery of the role of DNA tumor viruses in cancerous transformation are discussed. Oncogenes and tumor suppressors are analyzed with respect to their function in normal cell cycle, growth control and human cancers.
  F   BIOL
G6002
 2 MW
9:15-11:15
Protein Thermodynamics. J. Hunt
First half of semester (9/4 - 10/23.) Prerequisites: College-level general chemistry plus an introductory course in molecular biology or biochemistry. This course presents a rigorous introduction to solution thermodynamics and applies it to understanding the structural and functional features of proteins.  After exploring the conceptual origins of thermodynamic theory, the standard equations describing solution equilibria are derived and applied to analyzing biochemical reactions, with a focus on those involved in protein folding and allosteric communication.  The semester culminates with exploration of the energetic factors controlling the formation of protein secondary structures and the role of entropy-enthalpy compensation in determining the complex temperature-dependent thermodynamic properties of aqueous solutions.  The course emphasizes both qualitative understanding of the thermodynamic forces controlling the evolution and function of living organisms as well as practical application of thermodynamic methods and structural insight in laboratory research.  Tutorials cover the use of curve-fitting techniques to analyze biochemical equilibria as well as the use of molecular visualization software to understand protein structure and function.

 

Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics (bulletin listing)
  F   BCHM
G4250
4.5 MWF
4-5:30
Molecular Biophysics.  B. Honig  
Methods and principles involved in studying the structure and function of proteins, nucleic acids, membranes and their macromolecular assemblies.  Noncovalent forces and conformational analysis; ultracentrifugation, viscometry, circular dichroism, fluorescence, magnetic resonance, conformational changes in proteins and nucleic acids, topological properties of macromolecules.  Prerequisite: Basic physical and organic chemistry and the instructor’s permission. 
  Sp   BCHM
G6045
3 T
4-6
Membrane Receptor/Transport Proteins. A. Karlin
Molecular structure and function of membrane proteins; general principles and common threads.  Prerequisites and instructor's approval required.
  Sp   BCHM
G6275
4.5 MWF
4-5:30
Diffraction Analysis of Macromolecules. W. Hendrickson
Prerequisite: Biophysical Chemistry G4170 or the instructors’ permission. Content: Diffraction theory and applications to protein, nucleic acid, and membrane structures. Topics include electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, protein crystallography, electron and neutron diffraction and electron microscopy.
  F   BCHM
G6300
4.5 MW
2-3:50
Biochemistry/Molecular Biology I. L. Shapiro and E. Greene 
  Sp   BCHM
G6301
4.5

MWF

2-3:20

Biochemistry/Molecular Biology II. G. Gunderson and G. Di Paolo

 

Biomedical Engineering (bulletin listing)
v Sp   BMEN
E4010
2
W
2:40-3:55
Ethics for Biomedical Engineers. J. Loike
Prerequisite: senior status in biomedical engineering or the instructor's permission.  Covers a wide range of issues expected to confront graduates as they enter the biotechnology industry, research, or medical careers. Ethical issues raised by animal research, experimental drugs and treatments, record keeping in research and medicine, authorship of publications, conflicts of interest, identification and reporting of scientific misconduct. Presentation of student-selected topics will occupy the second half of the course.
  F   BMEN
E4340
3 W
4:10-6:40
Biomechanics of Cells. H. Huang
  F   BMEN
E4501
3 MW
11:40-12:55
Tissue Engineering I. H. Hess  
An introduction to the strategies and fundamental bioengineering design criteria in the development of biomaterials and tissue engineered grafts. Material structural-functional relationships, biocompatibility in terms of material and host responses. Through discussions, readings, and a group design project, students acquire an understand of cell-material interactions and identify the parameters critical in the design and selection of biomaterials for biomedical applications.
v Sp   BMEN
E4502
3 MW
11:40-12:55
Tissue Engineering II. C. Hung
  Sp  

BMEN

E4560

3  

Dynamics of biological membranes

Prerequisites: BIOL C2005, BMEN E4001 or equivalent. The structure and dynamics of biological (cellular) membranes are discussed, with an emphasis on biophysical properties. Topics include membrane composition, fluidity, lipid asymmetry, lipid-protein interactions, membrane turnover, membrane fusion, transport, lipid phase behavior. In the second half of the semester, students will lead discussions of recent journal articles.

v Sp  

BMEN

E4590

3

M

4:10 - 6:40

BioMems: cellular and molecular applications. S. Sia

Prerequisites: Chemistry CHEM C3443 or CHEN C3545 or equivalent and MATH V1201 Corequisites: BIOL C2005 or equivalent Topics include biomicroelectromechanical, microfluidic, and lab-on-a-chip systems in biomedical engineering, with a focus on cellular and molecular applications. Microfabrication techniques, biocompatibility, miniaturization of analytical and diagnostic devices, high-throughput cellular studies, microfabrication for tissue engineering, and in vivo devices.

  Sp  

BMEN

E8001

 3

T

1:10-3:55

Current Topics in Nanobiotechnology and Synthetic Biology. H. Hess

Review and critical discussion of recent literature in nanobiotechnology and synthetic biology. Experimental and theoretical techniques, critical advances. Quality judgments of scientific impact and technical accuracy. Styles of written and graphical communication, the peer review process. The purpose of this course is to acquaint students with recent advances in nanobiotechnology and synthetic biology, and practice critical reasoning skills and scientific techniques on the basis of recent literature. A central goal is to enable the students to arrive at well-founded judgments of technical and scientific quality of publications, in order to accelerate the growth of their ability to produce high-quality work themselves. The class will be conducted in seminar-format, with discussions moderated by the professor and anchored by student presentations evaluating assigned publications. The publications will treat both, theoretical and experimental work, and their selection will stress the important interplay between theoretical insights and experimental advances. The involved mathematical and computational approaches will be an integral part of the discussion. All students are required to read in detail each publication prior to its discussion in class. Each student will present two papers using a powerpoint presentation over the course of the class. All students will submit summaries of each discussion which briefly describe the goals, techniques, results and merits of each publication.

 

Biomedical Informatics (bulletin listing)
  Sp   BINF
G4013
3
W
9-12

Biological Sequence Analysis. R. Friedman
This course is the same as course  CMBS G4020, except that a final exam is required. Letter grade. The course covers PC operation, basic Unix, web-site usage, sequence comparison, database searching, multiple sequence alignment, profile methods, secondary structure prediction, mapping, primer design, and genomic analysis. 

Note: Must be registered and attend the first class.

  Sp   BINF
G4014
3 MR
11-12:30
Computational Biology. A. Rzhetsky
  Sp   BINF
G4015
3 TR
2-4
Computational Biology: Proteins, Networks and Function. D. Vitkup
  Sp   BINF
G4016
3 M
12:30 - 3:30
Quant/Comp Aspects of Infectious Diseases. R. Rabadan

 

Biostatistics (bulletin listing)
  F
XR BIST
P6100
1

MW
5:30-8

Introduction to Vital Statistics. M. Pavlicova 
Mass data of the health fields; the content of vital statistics; methods of collecting, tabulating, and graphing population data; A discussion of vital indices and the distinction between crude, specific and adjusted rates.  Direct standardization.  Life Table Analysis.

 

 

 

F
Sp
Su
XR BIST
P6103
3

TWR
8:30-11:20

 

Introduction to Biostatistics. R. Vaughan and J. Herrera
Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor required for all non-Public Health students. Biostatistics is essential to ensuring that findings and practices in public health and biomedicine are supported by reliable evidence. This course covers the basic tools for the collection, analysis, and presentation of data in all areas of public health. Central to these skills is assessing the impact of chance and variability on the interpretation of research findings and subsequent recommendations for public health practice and policy. Topics covered include: general principles of study design; probability, hypothesis testing; review of methods for comparison of discrete and continuous data including ANOVA, t-test, correlation, and regression. This course is part of the core course requirement for the MPH and is a prerequisite for other courses in the Department of Biostatistics and throughout the Mailman School of Public Health.
  Sp XR

BIST

6170

3

TR

8:30-9:50

New Drug Development: Regulatory Overview. R. Mac Arthur

Prerequisites: P6104 or the quantitative module of the MPH Core. This course will provide an introduction to the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the drug development and approval process, often referred to as the 'Critical Path'. The class will begin with a review of the history and organization of the FDA, and analysis of the principle steps along the critical path, including preclinical testing, clinical testing (drug development phase 0 thru IV), Good Laboratory Practices, Good Manufacturing Practices, Good Clinical Practices, and adverse event reporting. Different types of FDA submissions (IND, NDA, ANDA, SPA, eCTD), and FDA meetings will be examined, along with accelerated drug approval strategies, orphan drug development strategies, generic drug development, and post-marketing Sponsor commitments. Throughout the class we will study the related legislation and regulations that empower FDA, and the interrelated FDA guidance documents that define FDA expectations.

 

Business School Courses Limited availability Cross registration application



F
Sp
Su

XR FINC
B6302
3

 

Capital Markets and Investments.  M. Zurack et al.
NOTE: This course is required for enrollment in all upper-level finance courses (8300 and 9300) and must be taken prior to or concurrently with any upper-level finance course.  It is not required for upper-level economics courses (8200 and 9200). This course complements B6301(a core course) by introducing market and portfolio perspectives. The course starts with the discounted cash flow methodology, which ends B6301, and continues to the concept of term structure in the valuation of risk-free cash flows, including forward rates. Next, the general problem of valuing risky or uncertain cash flows is considered. This leads to the classical theoretical problems of portfolio diversification, the efficient frontier and two-fund separation. The capital asset pricing model (CAPM), arbitrage pricing theory (APT) and efficient market theory are explained. The Modigliani-Miller theory is presented as corporate-perspective application of asset valuation ideas. Rounding out the course is an introduction to the valuation of derivatives using binomial trees.

  Sp XR BUEC
B8299

-002
1.5
  Economics of Health Care & Pharmaceuticals.  F. Lichtenberg  
This course provides a basic overview of the health care industry that emphasizes the economic issues that affect medical care delivery and finance. It considers the efficiency of alternative health care delivery systems; analyzes incentives and organizational structure of the health care system; and assesses the roles of physicians, hospitals, pharmaceutical and device manufacturers, and HMOs and other contractual networks.
  Sp XR MGMT
B8799
-017
1.5


Strategy and Competition in Pharmaceuticals and Biotechnology. C. Cramer
This course examines the strategic, technology, competitive, organizational and political challenges impacting the global pharmaceuticals and biotechnology sector.  Critical issues examined include: the strategies and process of discovering, developing, and getting new drugs approved; the impact of government oversight and regulation; R&D/product portfolio strategies; patent strategies and challenges; the design of prescription drug plans and role of PBMS; competition between branded, generic and OTC products; industry and growth prospects; restructuring strategies to address slowing top-line growth; external/ business developing strategies; related legislative and health policy initiatives; and unique challenges of managing early-stage biotechnology companies.
  F XR

MGMT
B8799

-035

3  

Lean Launchpad. S. Blank

This 3 credit block week class will run from August 27th through to August 31st. This is a team-based course. The Professor would like the course to be made up of students from schools across the university as well as students from the business school. Students who successfully secure a seat in the course must be part of a team of 3-5 students prior to the first day of class.

The Lang Center will be organizing several mixers where students can meet to organize themselves into teams. Additionally, students may enter their information using a database or online form as a means to find a team.

We will begin notifying students as to whether or not they have gotten a seat in the course beginning July 12th. We will however, continue to accept the cross-registration form after this date.

  F XR OPMN
B8823
3   Healthcare Industry in the 21st Century. L. Green
This course provides an overview of the health care industry, the major players involved in the payment, production, and delivery of health care and the key challenges and opportunities facing health care executives, investors and policymakers. Topics include strategies for addressing costs, quality and access, and the perspectives of consumers/patients, payers, providers/caregivers, and producers/suppliers. Emphasis is placed on challenges and opportunities afforded by new legislation, information technology, and new methods of health care delivery and payment. Though the focus is primarily on the U.S., comparison with health care systems in other countries is also discussed. 
  Sp XR FINC
B9399
-03
1.5

 

Healthcare Investment and Dealmaking. C. Cramer
This course analyzes the unique characteristics and strategies in the health care sector from the perspective of venture capital firms investing in early-stage health care enterprises, private equity firms seeking to build value-creating health care platforms, and entrepreneurs seeking capital from these and other sources. The course addresses how to source attractive investment opportunities in a health care system which is costly, fragmented and inefficient; how investors can assess, value and manage the inherent risks in investing in a highly regulated and politically-charged environment; the unique challenges of healthcare entrepreneurs in building a management team and developing and financing research & commercial infrastructure; and in-depth business development and "dealmaking" strategies (partnering, licensing and M&A) pursued by health care companies to enhance completive position.

  F XR MRKT
B9601
1.5  

Health Care Marketing. M. Wosinska
This course covers marketing strategies for health care players, with an emphasis on pharmaceutical, biotechnology and medical device companies. It will focus on the environment and market dynamics that can have a significant impact on the success of these marketing strategies. Some of the issues addressed in this course include:  how to acquire and retain new patients; new product introduction and adoption; challenges and opportunities of value pricing; how marketing fits in early products development; how regulation and market structure affects availability of  physician and consumer data; customer segmentation strategies, effective use of advertising and public relations; information and market research; and sale force design and management.

  F XR

MRKT
B9601
-051

3   Seminar in Marketing; High Tech Marktng/Entreprnrshp. R. Kivetz 
  F XR MRKT
B9601
-075
1.5  

Pharmaceutical Development & Commercialization Workshop. C. Cramer and R. Essner

This course is designed for students with at least a basic understanding of the pharmaceutical industry. Students new to the industry are unlikely to benefit from the course, given the advanced class discussion.

  Sp XR MRKT
B9601
-081
1.5   Healthcare Business and Investment in Emerging Markets. C. Cramer

 

Cellular, Molecular, and Biophysical Studies (bulletin listing)
  Sp   CMBS
G4010
1

F

1-2

Responsible Conduct of Research and Related Policy Issues. J. Rubin and A. Palmer
This course explores a variety of ethical and policy issues that arise during the conduct of basic and clinical scientific research. Course sessions include lectures, discussion periods, and analyses of case studies.
  Sp  

CMBS

G4020


3

W

9-12

Biological Sequence Analysis. R. Friedman
This course is the same as course  BINF G4013, except that a final exam is not required. P/F grade only. The course covers PC operation, basic Unix, web-site usage, sequence comparison, database searching, multiple sequence alignment, profile methods, secondary structure prediction, mapping, primer design, and genomic analysis. 

Note: Must be registered and attend the first class.

  F   CMBS
G4150
4

MWF
10-11:30

Molecular Genetics. F. Chang 
Prerequisite: basic biology and biochemistry; the instructor’s permission. Basic aspects of prokaryotic molecular biology and genetics. Regulation of gene expression, molecular genetics of bacterial viruses, plasmids and transposable elements. Modern molecular genetic approaches to complex biological phenomena. Format: four to five hours of lecture and discussion per week.  Instructor's approval required. syllabus
  Sp   CMBS
G4350
4 MWF
10-11:30
Cellular Membrane and Organelle.  G. Gundersen
Introduction of eukaryotic cell biology; discussion of modern research approaches and current literature.  Format: 3 hours of lecture and 1 hour of student presentation per week.
  Sp   CMBS
G6301
4.5

MWF

2-3:20

Biochem, Cell/Molecular Biology II. G. DiPaolo and G. Gundersen

 

Chemical Engineering (bulletin listing)
  F   CHEN
E4700
3 W
6:10-8:40
Principles of Genomic Technology.   J. Ju
Chemical and physical aspects of genome structure and organization, genetic information flow from DNA to RNA to Protein. Nucleic acid hybridizationand sequence complexity of DNA and RNA. Genome mapping and sequencing methods. The engineering of DNA polymerase for DNA sequencing and polymerase chain reaction. Fluorescent DNA sequencing and high-throughput DNA sequence development. Construction of gene chip and microarray for gene expression analysis. Technology and biochemical approach for functional genomicsanalysis. Gene discovery and genetics database search method. The application of genetic database for new therapeutics discovery.  Department's approval required.
  Sp   CHEN
E4750
3 TR
2:40-3:55

The Genome and the Cell.   E.F. Leonard

Prerequisites: BIOL C2005, MATH E1210 The utility of genomic information lies in its capacity to predict the behavior of living cells in physiological, developmental, and pathological situations. The effect of variations in genome structure between individuals within a species, including those deemed healthy or diseased, and among species, can be inferred statistically by comparisons of sequences with behaviors, and mechanistically, by studying the action of molecules whose structure is encoded within the genome. This course examines known mechanisms that elucidate the combined effect of environmental stimulation and genetic makeup on the behavior of cells in homeostasis, disease states, and during development, and includes assessments of the probable effect of these behaviors on the whole organism.  Quantitative models of gene translation and intracellular signal transduction will be used to illustrate switching of intracellular processes, transient and permanent gene activation, and cell commitment, development, and death.

  Sp

 

CHEN

E4780

3

M

7-9:30

Quant Methods in Cell Biology. B. O'Shaughnessy

 

Chemistry (bulletin listing)
v Sp   BIOC
G4170
4.5 TF
4:25-5:40
Biophysical Chemistry. R. Gonzalez
Includes laboratory exercises in molecular computer graphics and in structural biological and chemical informatics.
  Sp   CHEM
G4172
4.5 TR
11:40-12:55

Bio-organic Topics. N. Berova and R. Breslow
Prerequisite: introductory organic chemistry. Recommended preparation: advanced organic chemistry. Various topics in bioactive molecules in the field centered on natural-products chemistry, metabolic transformations, and enzyme mechanisms. Biosynthesis of natural products and some other bioorganic topics.

  F   CHEM
W4312
4 TR
1:10-2:25

Chemical Biology. V. Cornish

Development and application of chemical methods for understanding the molecular mechanisms of cellular processes. Review of the biosynthesis, chemical synthesis, and structure and function of proteins and nucleic acids. Application of chemical methods--including structural biology, enzymology, chemical genetics, and the synthesis of modified biological molecules--to the study of cellular processes--including transcription, translation, and signal transduction.

Course Objectives: In this course, we will cover subject matter in chemical biology. We will discuss approaches for discovering and optimizing chemical tools for measuring and perturbing biological systems. Topics covered will include high-throughput assay development, screening, chemical library creation, high-throughput chemistry, affinity purification of target proteins and target validation, protein microarrays, molecular evolution, protein engineering and synthetic biology. The course is intended to provide a foundation needed for advanced chemical biology research, i.e. the creation and use of chemical probes of biological processes and macromolecular function. The course will be of interest to students at the interface between chemistry and biology, and students interested in medicine, academic chemical biology and drug discovery efforts.

 

Computer Science (bulletin listing)
v Sp   CBMF
W4761
3

MW

4:10-5:25

Computational Genomics.  I. Pe'er
Prerequisite: the instructor’s permission. Course will cover the computational methods used to search for, classify, analyze and model DNA, RNA and protein sequences. Course will also look at methods of analyzing other kinds of genomics information, such as data obtained from "gene chips". These methods form the core of an important and rapidly growing field of research, known variously as biosequence analysis, bioinformatics or computational molecular biology. 

 

Earth and Environmental Engineering (bulletin listing)
v Sp
  EAEE
E4901
3

TR
2:40-3:55

Environmentral Microbiology.   K. Chandran
Basic microbiological principles; microbial metabolism; identification and interactions of microbial populations responsible for the biotransformation of pollutants; mathematical modeling of microbially mediated processes; biotechnology and engineering applications using microbial systems for pollution control.
  F
  EAEE
E4950
3

TR
1:10-2:25

Environmental Biochemical Processes.  K. Chandran
Prerequisites: EAEE 4901 or CIEE E4252 or EAEE E4003 or the instructor's approval. Qualitative and quantitative considerations in engineered environmental biochemical processes. Characterization of multiple microbial reactions in a community and techniques for determining associated kinetic and stoichiometric parameters.
Engineering design of several bioreactor configurations employed for biochemical waste treatment. Mathematical modeling of engineered biological reactors using state-of-the-art simulation packages.

 

Ecology Evolutionary and Environmental Biology (bulletin listing)
v Sp
  EEEB
G4126
3

W
12:10-2

Introduction to Conservation Genetics.   D. Melnick
  Sp
  EEEB
G4127
3

W

11-12:50

Disease Ecology and Conservation.   A. Gomez
The course will describe the principles of disease investigation and disease ecology with emphasis on the effect of disease on human, animal, and ecosystem health, and the practice of conservation medicine.
  F   EEEB
G4165
3 W
6:10-8

Pathogen Evolution: Genes, Organisms, Populations and Ecosystems.   I. Brito
What roles do pathogens play in ecosystem stability? Do diseases evolve to be more virulent or benign over time? What allows certain diseases to emerge? How do disease control mechanisms affect pathogen evolution? These questions and others wil be discussed during the course. We will explore different selective pressures that affect the evolution of parasites, bacteria and viruses (and their hosts) at a variety of scales. We will touch upon different tools of analysis: genetic analysis, empirical evidence, phylogenetics, epidemiological modeling and landscape analysis needed to conceptually understand ecological, genetic and epidemiological drivers of host-pathogen evolution.

Topics to be discussed include: theories on the evolution of virulence; coevolution of host and pathogen; genetic variability of parasites, viruses and bacteria; roles of parasites in ecosystems; biodiversity and infectious disease; pathogen evolution over landscapes.

v Sp  

EEEB

W4321

4

W

2:10 - 4

Human Nature: DNA, Race & Identity. M. Pollack and R. E. Pollack

This 4 point seminar on Human Identity is taught from the perspective of four different disciplines; Law, Religion, Science, and Medicine. The course focuses on human identity, beginning with the individual over the lifespan and progressing to communal and global viewpoints using a framework of perspectives from biology, genetics, medicine, public health, psychiatry, religion and the law.

  F  

EEEB
G6110

3

T
9-10:50

Evolution I. R. DeSalle
Prerequisites: Priority given to first-year students in EEB or Conservation Biology Certificate program. Lecture course covering principal topics of evolutionary biology from genetics, genome organization, population and quantitative genetics, the history of evolutionary theory, systematics, speciation and species concepts, co-evolution, and biogeography.

 

Electrical Engineering (bulletin listing)
  F
  BMEB
W4020
3
T
7- 9:30

Computational Neuroscience: Circuits in the Brain. A. Lazar

Prerequisites ELEN E3801 or Biology W3004. The biophysics of computation: modeling biological neurons, the Hodgkin-Huxley neuron, modeling channel conductances and synapses as memristive systems, bursting neurons and central pattern generators, I/O equivalence and spiking neuron models. Information representation and neural encoding: stimulus representation with time encoding machines, the geometry of time encoding, encoding with neural circuits with feedback, population time encoding machines. Dendritic computation: elements of spike processing and neural computation, synaptic plasticity and learning algorithms, unsupervised learning and spike time-dependent plasticity, basic dendritic integration. Projects in Matlab.

  F   ECBM
E4060
3 M
7-9:30
Introduction to Genomic Information Science and Technology.  D. Anastassiou  
This course introduces the "information system paradigm" of molecular biology and genetics, in which biomolecular sequences are viewed as elements of digital information systems and recombination and other biomolecular processes are viewed as mathematical operations with simulation and visualization using simple computer programming in MATLAB. All concepts and methods will be introduced. No previous computer or biology background is required for the course.  Electronic access for students who have time conflict with other courses.

 

Environmental Health Sciences (bulletin listing)
v
Sp XR EHSC
P6300
3
R
5:30-8:20
Environmental health sciences. G. Freyer
Environmental factors have a profound impact on the public’s health. Essential to understanding and addressing this impact is a focused study in basic and applied environmental health sciences. Environmental health problems intersect with health disparities, government policy, reproductive health, population shifts, and economic forces. Recognizing the need for a solid grounding in both environmental health sciences and the interconnections with other societal issues significantly improves the way we conduct public health research and professional practice. In this course, students will engage in scientific inquiry into environmental health issues and develop problem-solving skills for improving health at the local, regional and global levels.
  F XR

EHSC

P6385

3

W

8:30-11:20

 

Principles of genetics and the environment. G. Freyer

This course will provide EHS students with a deeper knowledge of the biology that underlies environmental health sciences. The goal is to provide students with knowledge of how exposure leads to adverse health effects. The course will begin with a description of the molecular mechanisms that control cellular processes that are affected by environmental exposures. This will include molecular genetics, classical genetics, epigenetics and human genetics. Course material will cover the processes of the cell cycle, protein synthesis and modification, carcinogenesis and other diseases. Building on these fundamental concepts we will explore systems that are the targets of environmental exposure, the nervous system, respiratory system, cardiovascular system and the immune system. Infectious diseases and problems arising from over population will be discussed. The format of the course will include didactic lectures, group work and reading assignments from primary papers.

  Sp XR

EHSC

P6386

3  

Principles of genetics and the environment II.

This is the second semester of PGE. This course builds on the first semester and will focus on the human genetics and the role of the environment in human genetic disease. It should be of interest to students who want to pursue studies on human health that involve both genetics and environmental factors such as asthma, alcoholism, schizophrenia and cancer. The course will basically cover 3 areas of genetics, classical genetics including Mendelian and Population Genetics, molecular genetics including genetic engineering and genomics, and gene environment interactions. This course will require a large amount of work from the students, but active participation should be rewarding. Prerequisites: P6385

 

Epidemiology (bulletin listing)

F XR EPID
P6400
3
R
5:30- 8:20
Principles of Epidemiology I. S. Martins
Epidemiology is one of the pillars of public health. Epidemiologists study the distribution and determinants of disease in human populations; they also develop and test ways to prevent and control disease. The discipline covers the full range of disease occurrence, including genetic and environmental causes for both infectious and noninfectious diseases. Increasingly, epidemiologists view causation in the broadest sense, as extending from molecular factors at the one extreme, to social and cultural determinants at the other. This course introduces students to the theory, methods, and body of knowledge of epidemiology. Students taking P6400 MUST register for a section of P6402

Su XR EPID
P8401
3 TR
5:30-8:20
Evaluation of Drug Safety. J. Doyle and R. Gross
This course is intended to provide students with an understanding of the methods and applications of pharmacoepidemiology (PE). Epidemiologic methods will be reviewed in the context of drug evaluation. Students will be exposed to the role of PE in the biopharmaceutical development process from the perspectives of regulators (i.e. FDA and EMEA), industry, and payers (e.g. managed care). The epidemiology core course is required as a prerequisite for this course.
  Sp XR EPID
P8404
3

M

2:30-5:20

Epidemiology and Genetics of Aging. J. H. Lee
Prerequisite: Public Health P8438. Introduction to research in aging from both the epidemiologic and human genetics perspectives. Methodologic and substantive issues related to aging health profiles are discussed. Topics include study design, modeling of aging, active life expectancy, geriatric conditions, statistical genetics methods, gene mapping of aging phenotypes, human model system, and application to health policy. Required readings, three papers, and one problem set.

  F XR EPID
P8414
3 W
1-3:50
Cancer Epidemiology. A. Neugut
Prerequisites: Public Health P6400. Molecular and cellular biology of cancer and basic mechanisms of carcinogenesis. Role of chemical, viral, radiation, and genetic factors in human cancer. Sources of cancer patient data, with emphasis on acquisition and management of data for clinical and epidemiologic research. Natural history of cancer with analysis of time trends in cancer incidence, mortality, survival, and geographic distribution. Role of environmental factors (ecological/industrial/ occupational) in cancer causation. Fundamental issues in cancer screening and applications to public health and medical practice. Lectures and discussions. Assigned readings and term paper.
  F XR EPID
P8475
3 W
1-3:50
Emerging Infectious Diseases. S. Morse
Prerequisites: Public Health P6400 and some familiarity with molecular biology; Public Health P8406 recommended. Examines the concept of emerging infectious diseases and our current understanding of emergence. Methods of identifying and studying emerging pathogens, factors responsible for disease emergence, and methods of surveillance and intervention are discussed. Examples of pathogens are considered. As problems closely related to the natural examples of emerging infectious diseases, public health aspects of biowarfare and bioterrorism are also discussed. By the end of the course, the student should understand what constitutes an emerging infection, appreciate why and how infections emerge, understand what approaches are currently available to track, predict, and respond to emerging infections, recognize the strengths and limitations of current capabilities for surveillance and control, and be able to identify similarities and differences between natural outbreaks of disease and biowarfare/bioterrorism. Lectures, presentations by invited speakers, and discussions. Midterm and final exam or paper.

 

Genetics and Development (bulletin listing)
v Sp   GEND
G4027
3

M
10-11:30
R
3-4:30



Principles of Developmental Biology. A. Tomlinson
Required for first-year Genetics and Development students. Open to students from all departments, but students from outside the Genetics Department should consult the instructor before registering. The course emphasizes the molecular control of vertebrate embryogenesis. Divided into three main areas: early embryogenesis, developmental neurobiology, and the development and differentiation of specialized organs or lineages. A combination of faculty lectures and presentations by participating students.
  F   GEND
G4050
4 W
3-6
Advanced Eukaryotic Molecular Genetics.  T. Bestor  
Required for second year Genetics and Development students. Prerequisite: at least one graduate-level biochemistry or molecular biology course, and the instructor’s permission. Advanced treatment of the principles and methods of the molecular biology of eukaryotes, emphasizing the organization, expression, and evolution of eukaryotic genes. Topics include reassociation and hybridization kinetics, gene numbers, genomic organization at the DNA level, mechanisms of recombination, transposable elements, DNA rearrangements, gene amplification, oncogenes, recombinant DNA techniques, transcription and RNA splicing. Students participate in discussions of problem sets on the current literature.  
v Sp   GEND
G4502
4   Methods in Genetics and Development. V. Papaioannou
  F   GEND
G6210
3 T
1-4
Genetic Approaches to Biological Problems.  R. Rothstein  
Required for first year Genetics and Development students. Open to all students. Designed to illustrate how genetic systems have played a fundamental role in our understanding of basic biological problems: mitosis and meiosis, chromosomal linkage and mapping, consequences of chromosomal rearrangements, mechanisms of recombination and gene conversion, the use of mutants to study gene structure, regulation and the cell cycle, uses of recombinant DNA in genetic analysis, and the genetic analysis of development in Drosophila.
v Sp   GEND
G6211
3 T
1-4

Genetic Approaches II. M. Shirasu-Hiza
Required for first-year Genetics and Development students. Continuation of Genetics G6210. Basic principles and current areas of interest in mouse and human genetics. An introduction to mouse genetics; X-chromosome inactivation and genomic imprinting; genetic manipulation of the mouse; genetics of mouse coat color; genetics of sex determination; the mouse T-complex; human linkage analysis; somatic cell genetics; physical mapping of the human genome; cytogenetics; Huntington’s disease; muscular dystrophy and Alzheimer’s disease; and gene therapy. 

 

Institute of Human Nutrition (bulletin listing)
v Sp   NUTR
G4020
4

T

9-11:50

Molecular/ Cell Biology of Nutrients. L. Huang

 

International and Public Affairs
  F XR INAF
U6014
3

M
6:10-9

Accounting. L. Errickson
IPA Dept. approval required.
    XR PUAF
U6607
3 M
2:10-4
Science/Tech & Economic Growth.  R. Mazzoleni  
v Sp XR PUAF
U8203
-001
3 M
6:10-8
Project Management. T. Quaranta
Project Management is an essential skill for all senior managers. Its successful implementation often determines whether an organization meets its objectives or not. Project management is defined as the application of knowledge, skills, tools and techniques to a broad range of activities in order to meet the requirements of the particular project. Project management knowledge and practices are best described in terms of their component processes: initiating, planning, executing, controlling and closing. Knowledge areas include scope management, time management, cost management, quality management, risk management, and change management.
  Sp XR PUAF
3 T
4:10-6
US Science and Technology Policy.  B. Sampat  
An overview of the science and technology policy environment in the U.S., and an examination of key issues and sub-governmental systems. Policy will be reviewed in the context of a global economy and the competing system for innovation around the globe.  This course will emphasize the policy in science arena more than the science in policy realm. Whether your interest is using scientific knowledge over the long term to influence broader policy discussions or to use the capabilities of the research community to solve socially important problems, it is essential to possess a thorough understanding of the norms of the research community and the mechanisms whereby research priorities are developed and funded.  Note:  Pre-registration not available for GSAS students.  Register in January instead.  

 

Microbiology& Immunology (bulletin listing)
  Sp   MICR
G4020
4
TR
1:30-3
Graduate Immunology. C. Schindler
Survey of the major topics in basic immunology with an emphasis on the molecular basis for immune recognition and regulation.
  F   MICR
G4120
1 M
2 - 3:30
Intro to Computational Biology. O. Jovanovic
  Sp   MICR
G4900
4 MW
2:30-4
Chromosome Dynamics and Genome Stability. L. Symington
A seminar course to discuss recent advances in chromosome replication, segregation and DNA repair, processes essential for the stable inheritance of the genome. Guest lecturers will be invited to give seminars as part of the weekly Microbiology seminar series and will meet with the students to discuss their work. Papers to be discussed will focus on the use of several model systems and will emphasize the use of genetic approaches to understand these processes. There will be two 90 min classes/week for 12 weeks.
  F   MICR
G6055
3 R
2-4
Advanced Topics in Microbiology I. C. Schindler
  Sp   MICR
G6056
3 R
2-4
Advanced Topics in Microbiology II. L. Symington

 

Neurobiology and Behavior (bulletin listing)
  F   NBHV
G4007
3  

Synaptic Transmission and Plasticity. C. Bailey, R. Bruno, A. MacDermott and C. Waites
A seminar on the cellular and molecular processes influencing synaptic transmission which will address the issue of how organelles and proteins localize to synapses by considering the transport and sorting of materials; the synthesis of proteins at synapses and mechanisms of retaining materials at synapses; the molecular mechanisms of exocytosis and endocytosis at the synapse; the physiology of synaptic transmission at excitatory and inhibitory synapses and how derangements of synaptic transmission give rise to neurological and psychiatric disorders. D.Goldberg, Bailey, MacDermott, and McCabe

  Sp   NBHV
G6056
3

W
4-6

Biology of Neurological and Psychiatric Disorders.  R. Hen, S. Rayport, and S. Small
Advanced seminar course on basicscience approaches to schizophrenia, Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Huntington's disease, anxiety disorders, epilepsy, etc.  
  F   NBHV
G4340
6 TR
3-5
Survey of Neuroscience. A. Kerzhner and S. Shacher
v Sp   NBHV
G4360
3

MW

2:30 - 4

Theoretical Neuroscience. K. Miller, A. Kerzhner, L. Abbott, S. Fusi
  Sp   NBHV
G6020
3   Systems Neuroscience. M. Goldberg, J. Gottlieb and A. Kerzhner
  Sp     NBHV
G6040
3

TR
2:30-4

Advance Topics in Theoretical Neuroscience. L. Abbott, K. Miller, A. Kerzhner, and S. Fusi
v Sp   NBHV
G9002
3

MW

1-4

Introduction to Neural Development. W. Grueber, C. Mason, and A. Kerzhner
This course is open to graduate students in GSAS; previous coursework in Neuroscience required. Lecture and seminar presentations are restricted to students officially registered for the course.
V Sp   NBHV
G6001
1 W
12-1:30
Responsible Conduct- Research/Policy. K. Miller and A. Kerzhner
  Sp   NBHV
G9010
3   Neural Bases of Behavior. D. Kelley and I. Kupfermann  
An examination of how the nervous system controls behavior in a variety of animal model systems, both vertebrate and invertebrate (owls to crickets). Topics include: navigation, social communication, aggression, courtship, feeding, fear, and sleep. Lectures and student presentations.

 

Pathology and Cell Biology (bulletin listing)
  Sp  

PATH

G4001

3
Cellular Tissue & Architecture   R. Liem and L. Pon
  F   PATH
G4500
3

MW

5-6:30

Cancer Biology I. B. Tycko
Required for students on the cancer training grant. Open to all students. An integrated and critical review of cancer biology, emphasizing recent research. Topics discussed include: natural history and epidemiology of cancer; morphology and behavior of cancer cells; DNA and RNA tumor viruses; oncogenes; tumor suppressor genes; signal transduction; the genetics of cancer; cancer and cellular differentiation; cancer causation: physical and chemical agents; multistage carcinogenesis; hormones, nutrients, and growth factors in cancer. Readings are largely original research papers and review articles. One 2-hour seminar per week.
  Sp  

PATH

G4501

3

 

Cancer Biology II. E. Gelmann and A. Neugut.

No Pre-requisite.

  F   PATH
G6003
4.5 MWF
10-12
Mechanisms in Human Disease I. R. Liem and S. Spitalnik
Preapproval required at the Biotech Program office.  Open only to graduate students in the basic and medical science departments. Prerequisite: course director’s permission; knowledge of biochemistry and cell biology. The molecular and cellular basis for human disease, with an emphasis on modern research in characterization and treatment. Lectures, conferences, assigned readings, written and oral presentations. syllabus
  Sp  

PATH

G6004

3   Mechanisms in Human Disease II. R. Liem.
  Sp  

PATH

G6100

3 R
1-3:30

Stem Cells & Lineage Specific. L. Sussel and F. Doetsch

The lecture series will include general lectures, analyses and discussions of primary literature on stem cell biology, as well as student presentations. The themes to be presented include 1.  basic stem cell concepts; 2. basic cell and molecular biological characterization of endogenous stem cell populations from a number of model systems; 3. concepts related to reprogramming; 4.  directed differentiation of stem cell populations; 5. the use of stem cells in disease modeling or tissue replacement/repair; 6. ethical considerations of stem cell research.

 

Pharmacology (bulletin listing)
  Sp   PHAR
G4600
3
W
4:15-6:30
Structure and Function of Membrane Channels. K. Allis, H. Colecraft and N. Harrison 
Prerequisite: Neural Science M6106 or the equivalent. This course and Physiology G4001 are recommended for students concentrating in Biophysics. A detailed analysis of the biophysical and structural properties of ionic channels in biological membranes.
  F   PHAR
G8001
3

TR
10-12

Principles of Systems Pharmacology. R. Robinson and K. Allis

The course begins (mid September) with a section on basic principles involved in new drug development e.g. requirements for different routes of administration, how appropriate amounts of drugs get to their therapeutic targets (drug distribution and pharmacokinetics), and how drugs interact with their intended and unintended targets to cause therapeutic and toxic effects (drug receptor interactions). New approaches to drug design will also be discussed. The course then continues, examining effects of currently used drugs on different organ systems, providing an overview of mechanisms of therapeutic actions and toxicities and new directions in drug development based on recent genetic, molecular and biochemical research. Systems to be covered include central and autonomic nervous system including treatment of drug abuse, cardiovascular, renal, gastrointestinal, and endocrine. Each session will involve a lecture and discussion with an expert preceptor. Prospective students should have some understanding of basic human physiology although an opportunity to expand this knowledge will be provided.  For more information, please contact the course director, Dr. Andrew L Wit (alw4@columbia.edu) or the course administrator, Ms. Karen Allis (kja7@columbia.edu)

v Sp   PHAR
G9600
4 TR
10-12
Molecular Pharmacology: from Membrane to Nucleus. K. Allis and C. Kellendonk
Required for all graduate students in pharmacology. Pre-requisite: familiarity with basic biochemistry and molecular biology. Introduction to molecular approaches to target identification and drug development and delivery for cellular and sub cellular processes that contribute to human disease. The principles of drug-receptor interactions; ion channels asmolecular targets of neurohormones and drugs; structure and function of G-protein coupled receptors; cytoplasmic signaling molecules including receptor and non-receptor tyrosine kinases and serine-threonine kinases; neuro-psychopharmacology;the pharmacology of inflammation; and novel approaches to gene-targeted pharmacology. Integration of molecular processes and human disease including cancer, neuro degenerative disease; cardiovascular disease, and psychiatric disorders is stressed.

 

Physiology and Cellular Biophysics (bulletin listing)
  F   PSLG
G6001
4 TR
4:30-6:30
Principles of Physiology.  S. Lenhart and J. Loike  
  Sp   PSLG
G6002
4

TR
4:30-6

Molecular Pathophysiology Cardiovascular System. A. Tall, J. Loike

 

Psychology (bulletin listing)
  F   PSYC
G4440
3
R
4:10-6

Topics in Neurobiology and Behavior. R. Silver

syllabus

v Sp   PSYC
G4440
3 M
6:10-8
Topics in Neurobiology and Behavior. C. Hart
  F  

PSYC
G4486

new!

4 R
2:10-4

Developmental Affective Neuroscience. N. Tottenham

Prerequisites: Courses in developmental psychology, and either research methods or affective neuroscience, and instructor's permission. Introduction to leading theoretical perspectives employed by developmental psychologists in the study of affective neuroscience. Exploration of the developmental brain and behavior relationships in humans and animal models of typical and atypical emotional behavior, with a critical reading of recent research findings in the field.

 

Statistics (bulletin listing)
  F   SIEO
W4150
3

TR
5:40-6:55

or

MW
10:10-11:25


Introduction to Probability and Statistics. M. Brown or K. Sigman
Prerequisite: a working knowledge of calculus. Fundamentals of probability theory and statistical inference. Probabilistic models, random variable, useful distributions, expectations, laws of large numbers, central limit theorem. Statistical inference: point and confidence interval estimation, hypothesis tests, linear regression. 
v Sp   SIEO
W4150
3

MW
2:40-3:55

 

Introduction to Probability and Statistics. M. Brown
Prerequisite: a working knowledge of calculus. Fundamentals of probability theory and statistical inference. Probabilistic models, random variable, useful distributions, expectations, laws of large numbers, central limit theorem. Statistical inference: point and confidence interval estimation, hypothesis tests, linear regression.