The XYZ Lab at Columbia University

Light-matter interaction, solar energy conversion, ultrafast spectroscopy

Group members | Publications

Research highlights

We are interested in the general problem of light-condensed matter interaction. A main research thrust is to establish new photophysical mechanisms that may be utilized to revolutionize solar energy conversion or light emission. As examples, recent discoveries in our lab showed how an electron and a hole is bound by the Coulomb potential across an organic semiconductor interface, how an exciton can split into two via the singlet fission process, and how hybrid semiconductors can yield the highest possible quantum efficiency in light emission.

perovskite nanowire lasers

time resolved SHG

NOPA lasers
Hybrid semiconductor for efficient light absorption/emission

J. Am. Chem. Soc. 137, 2089 (2015).
Nature Mater.
14, 636 (2015)

Singlet fission in organic semiconductors

Nature Chem. 4 , 840 (2012).
334, 1541 (2011).

Hot carrier & manybody interaction in  quantum confined semiconductors:

Nano Lett. 13 , 6091 (2013).
328, 1543 (2010).

Charge transfer excitons at van der Waals interfaces:

Nature Mater. 12, 66 (2013).
Phys. Rev. Lett. 114,
247003 (2015).

XYZ Lab News

10/2014: Congratulations to Xinjue Zhong, who was awarded the prestigious Rutgers Fellowship for her outstanding performance in graduate studies in physical chemistry.

11/2014: Prakriti Joshi, Jue Wang, and Kihong Lee joined the group.

12/2015: The inauguration of our Materials Research Science and Engineeting Center (MRSEC), Center for Precision Assembly of Superstratic and Superatomic Solids.

4/1/2015: Dr. Kiyoshi Miyata joined the group as a postdoc. Kiyoshi comes to us from Kyoto University.

5/4/2015: XYZ and Greg Scholes (Princeton) held the first joint group symposium at Columbia.

5/7/2015: Congratulations to Xiaoxi Wu, who successfully defended her PhD thesis on the Photophysics of Perovskites.

6/23/2015: Congratulations to Cory Nelson, who successfully defended his PhD thesis on Nonlinear Spectroscopy of Interfaces.

8/11/2015: Congratulations to Nick Monahan, who successfully defended his PhD thesis on Ultrafast Exciton Dynamics at Molecular Surfaces.