Bīrūnī, Muḥammad ibn Aḥmad, Alberuni's India (v. 2)

(London :  Kegan Paul, Trench, Trübner & Co.,  1910.)

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(    i64   )
 

CHAPTER   LXXII.

ON   INHERITANCE,   AND   WHAT   CLAIM   THE   DECEASED
PERSON   HAS   ON  IT.

Liiw of in- The chief rule of their law of inheritance is this, that
the women do not inherit, except the daughter. She
gets the fourth part of the share of a son, according to
a passage in the book Mctnu. If she is not married,
the money is spent on her till the time of her marriage,
and her dowry is bought by means of her share. After¬
wards she has no more income from the house of her
father.

If a widow does not burn herself, but prefers to remain
alive, the heir of her deceased husband has to provide
her with nourishment and clothing as long as she lives.

The debts of the deceased must be paid by his heir,
either out of his share or of the stock of his own pro¬
perty, no regard being had whether the deceased has
left any property or not. Likewise he must bear the
just-mentioned expenses for the widow in any case
whatsoever.

As regards the rule about the male heirs, evidently
the descendants, i.e. the son and grandson, have a nearer
claim to the inheritance than the ascendants, i.e. the
Page 282. father and grandfather. Further, as regards the single
relatives among the descendants as well as the ascen¬
dants, the nearer a man is related, the more claim he
has on inheriting. Thus a son has a nearer claim than
a grandson, a father than a grandfather.

The collateral relations, as, e.g., the brothers, have less
  Page 164