Home
Search transcripts:    Advanced Search
Notable New     Yorkers
Select     Notable New Yorker
Bennett CerfBennett Cerf
Photo Gallery
Transcript

Session:         Page of 1029

Q:

Yes. You discussed that once before. I know Quentin Reynolds was one of your big wartime authors. Tell about him.

Cerf:

Quentin Reynolds started his career like Westbrook Pegler did: in the sports department, covering the Brooklyn Dodgers and writing color stories. At the outbreak of the War, he was sent to London. There it was discovered that he had a mellifluous and beautiful voice. So they transformed him temporarily into a star broadcaster. He was the man who broadcast all of the big Nazi bombing raids of London.

Q:

Well, Edward Murrow did, too.

Cerf:

Quent worked with Murrow. Murrow gave the news. Quent did the color stories. He was very warm and colorful and a born optimist. It was very nice to hear Quent's reassuring stories about how the English were holding out--which, indeed, they were.

He became a hero in England because he brought hope to people in his broadcasts. He was a very brave fellow. He participated in the first abortive invasion of Dunkirk. The invasion was repulsed, but what they were up to, of course, was sounding out and planning for D-Day.

At the war's end, we published several more books by Quent Reynolds, all very successful.

Then came a famous episode. Readers‘Digest dug up a spine-tingling story about a Canadian named Dupre who had gone



© 2006 Columbia University Libraries | Oral History Research Office | Rights and Permissions | Help