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Session:         Page of 592

me has been shown all over the world, won all kinds of awards. She's now teaching at NYU and is working on another film. The first film she did, she did it with videotape, was on Earl Dotter -- on Bread and Roses. She offered to do it very cheap, with a fellow who worked with her on the Louis Hine thing. It was originally to be on Earl Dotter, and on his exhibition. Then she's decided that it should be on Earl Dotter and the southern textile workers, and that she wanted to go south to Roanoke Rapids, to shoot there. What started out to be a cheap 7,000 dollar thing that I got funded, was jumping over the cost to 11,000, 12,000 dollars. You know, I can manage it but I was always being careful. When she finished it and she showed it to us I asked Johnny Schultz to come, because it was not good. So I asked Johnny, “Come and tell her what she has to do to it.” So she reworked it. I still have it. It's not very very good but she did it. She was then a student at NYU under George Stoney, and she learned. She is now -- did you ever see this Louis Hine documentary? Powerful. Powerful thing, because it treats the life.

See Walter Rosenblum was in the Film and Photo League in the 1930s. Walter is a very very gifted photographer, and a good teacher. Walter told me to get Earl Dotter, and I got to Earl that way. In that portfolio, Walter wrote the thing on what he calls. “Dotter: The Louis Hine of Our Generation.”

Q:

Dotter then was working on the staff of the Mine Workers Journal, right?

Foner:

On the Mine Workers Journal he was sort of freelancing, and he came and he did an exhibition at 1199 before Bread and Roses. We planned an exhibition on “In Mine and Mill,” a portrait of southern textile workers. No, he did an exhibition on miners before that. Before that it was miners, and then I had the idea of -- he's a very modest person, but he wanted a portfolio. I said, “Okay I'll get you a portfolio, I'll get it funded.” I said, “We ought to include the miners. We'll call it “In Mine and Mill.”

Q:

So we've covered Bread and Roses!

Foner:

I think we've covered Bread and Roses. From now on it's all downhill. [laughs] Uphill, downhill. All right?

Q:

All right.

Foner:

Okay.

[END OF SESSION]



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