Home
Search transcripts:    Advanced Search
Notable New     Yorkers
Select     Notable New Yorker
Moe FonerMoe Foner
Photo Gallery
Transcript

Session:         Page of 592

who had been at 65 and were important in public relations and making a lot of money and were always saying to me, “Moe, you know, you come here, you'll make a fortune.” I said then, and I believe today, that I was sort of blessed to be in the right place at the right time and I wasn't interested in making more money. I was fine here. I never campaigned for wage increases for myself. Whatever the union decided, we got.

Q:

What was the most you made in 1199?

Foner:

In 1199 I was hired at sixty.

Q:

Sixty dollars a week?

Foner:

Sixty dollars a week. I remember Martin Cherkasky at the settlement meeting at Montefiore saying to Davis, “How much do you pay this guy?”

He said, “He makes sixty dollars a week.”

He turned to me, and he said, “Look, if you ever need a job, contact me.”

Anyway, I can't remember what I was making, because the wages went up as the standards went up. We go to a hundred dollars a week [cross-talk] So I may have been making at the end -- oh, I'm guessing maybe $250, maybe $300, probably more than that.

Q:

So $250 or $300 a week.

Foner:

Three hundred, maybe a little more.

Q:

But what was the rule of thumb that staff salaries and officers' salaries were pegged to?

Foner:

The rule was -- and I'm pleased that I played a role in pushing this -- that nobody should receive more than what the worker in the highest category makes, that your salary should not be higher.

Q:

Nobody including the president or the [cross-talk]

Foner:

Including the president. I remember when Dennis came in. His salary was low, and they needed special action to get him to be raised. He was not able to pay his rent. That was a big problem.

Q:

Well, let's move on to Dennis now.

Foner:

Okay.



© 2006 Columbia University Libraries | Oral History Research Office | Rights and Permissions | Help