Home
Search transcripts:    Advanced Search
Notable New     Yorkers
Select     Notable New Yorker
Moe FonerMoe Foner
Photo Gallery
Transcript

Session:         Page of 592

anything else we've got to do and using the band on sketches. That beginning, really, of becoming involved in performance and that kind of thing, but I'd been through bands already, so I knew a little bit about it.

Q:

But in that period, you're beginning the role of being the impresario.

Foner:

Emcee, that kind of thing, yes. But let me come back to the job thing after we were suspended. Now Phil -- it goes back and forth here on the time -- Phil is married and has a child. Jack is not married. Henry is not married. I am not married. So there's an agreement that the first job that comes will go to Phil. The first job is an offer to me to become education director of the Fur Floor Boys. The Fur Floor Boys is the young people in the Furriers Union, the left thing. Nwo, they come to me because I'm known in the student movement. And we huddle and we say, “The job is for Phil.” So Phil takes that job as education director, and he makes the job fit his needs, and he starts writing, and he ends up with a history of the Furriers Union, and he's lecturing and writing. He designed the job for himself, but that's the job he took, and he got that job.

I was offered a job with the JPF, or the Jewish People's Fraternal Order, to be their organizer in Cleveland. I decided against it. I got married. I met Anne playing in the band. I met Anne. Anne was active in the student movement, Queens College. 1939, we were playing in a resort in the Peekskill area, Blue Mountain Lodge, right near the Blue Mountain reservation, which is a state-supported place, which has cottages and stuff and is like a conference center. Going on is a training school for the ASU. Anne is there, and the people would come over to our place, and that's where I met Anne. Not too long after, we got married.

Q:

When, exactly, did you get married?

Foner:

In '41, in the winter of '41. I don't have a job, playing in the band, and Anne is working, she's graduated, she was an economics major, and she's working for Moody's Investment Service. She lives in Flushing. When I'm going out with her, I'm coming all the way out here to visit. Flushing. When I mean “all the way out here,” this is like virgin territory at the time. But I had been to Flushing when I was a kid. We used to come out here for vacations. But anyway, this is the point where I first turned off, and I'll tell you of the job. We go on our honeymoon in the wintertime. Of course, the band has a job that week, it's Christmas week, playing at Arrowhead Lodge, and the honeymoon --



© 2006 Columbia University Libraries | Oral History Research Office | Rights and Permissions | Help