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Notable New     Yorkers
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Mary LaskerMary Lasker
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Part:         Session:         Page of 1143

happen to be the ones that had the push, because any powerful men could have gotten this done much faster and better. Really. We did it the hard way, as you see.

Q:

You had to overcome all sorts of obstacles. . .

Lasker:

We had to overcome everything!

Q:

Which, I suppose, are inherent in a picture like that, where you're talking in terms of millions and women are talking in terms of millions, and this is an obstacle.

Lasker:

And this is an obstacle, certainly, and if we'd had any really big businessmen or big men who were interested in other large projects really helping us with the President or in the Senate, talking directly to them, or people who had helped them in any substantial way in their local levels, all of this could have been expedited. But this is the way it was done.

Q:

And my mind immediately goes back to Florence Nightingale, Clara Barton and to other, who, in this whole area, have been most influential.

Lasker:

But the people that have made the major discoveries, except for Madame Curie, are men. It's curious, isn't it? Of course, very few women are in medicine at all.



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