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Mary LaskerMary Lasker
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In October he got a heart attack and after that contracted pneumonia. Now, in these days the heart attack could probably have been taken care of much more effectively with anti-coagulants, and certainly pneumonia would have been taken care of in a man his age by penicillin or one of the antibiotics, so if it had happened even a few years later, in '46 say, he'd probably be alive. But he was ill just at the moment when medicine wasn't ready to help him adequately.

Q:

This, undoubtedly, made its impact on you, too.

Lasker:

Oh, it made a great impact on me, and I remember going to his funeral and feeling very bitter about it. I felt that he probably hadn't been well enough taken care of, but I didn't know specifically what could have been done. Now I know that maybe the knowledge wasn't in hand but that had he just lived a little longer he probably could have been saved.

Well, Franklin Roosevelt was, of course, overwhelmingly elected in '44, and by this time, as I recall, I voted for him in '44. Between the election in '40 and the one in '44, I'd become a friend of Anna Rosenberg and Judge and Mrs. Rosenman and Mrs. Roosevelt, and my whole knowledge and feeling about politics were incredibly more educated and had changed completely.

Q:

How did Mr. Lasker feel about this shift of allegiance?

Lasker:

Oh, he didn't mind because he really agreed, and had he



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