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Mary LaskerMary Lasker
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anything by her until about five years ago, and I bought three painters--one a tiny flower, a morning glory, and one of a large autumn leaf and one a cottonwood landscape. The latter I've loaned to Mr. David Bell, the head of AID in Washington, as he particularly likes the work of Georgia O'Keeffe and I had no place to hang them.

About five years ago I decided to take some action about the contemporary American by collecting contemporary American painters.

Q:

Did you hope that this would stimulate interest in them by adding to your own personal collection?

Lasker:

Well, no, I didn't think especially that. I had been very successful in buying the outstanding and recognizing the outstanding French painters in the first half of the 20th century, and as I came to look around in the late '50s, I noticed that there were very few new painters in France and that there were a great many new abstract-expressionist painters or seemed to be in the United States. A man called Jackson Pollock had broken away completely from all formal conceptions of painting, and others--like de Koonig, Franz Klein and Gottlieb--were making paintings that were quite fresh and different from



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