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Notable New     Yorkers
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Mary LaskerMary Lasker
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the early '50s were getting a few hundred or a thousand or two thousand dollars for their work--people like Rothko get $15- to $20,000 for their big paintings, and Klein got $15,000 for paintings at least toward the end of his life. Gottlieb gets between $6000 and $7500 at least. As I've said, Wyeth is very expensive. So because there's an enormous properity in the western world and corporations are now buying--the pace having been set by Mr. Block in Inland Steel and David Rockefeller at the Chase National Bank--there are corporate purchasers that are buying paintings and sculptures to decorate their office buildings so that the demand for their work is out of all proportion to anything that's ever been known by artists in the United States or any place else for that matter during their own lifetimes. The important pictures by people during the last half of the 20th century are fabulously expensive. Any good Matisse is over $100,000. Any really good Picasso is over $100,000. Any really great Brque is over $100,000. The success of art in this last five years has been unparalleled, fantastic--of good examples of recent and living artists.

Q:

It makes one hearken back to classical times to see the extensive use of art in our day.

Lasker:

Yes. There's been a kind of explosion of interest in



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