Home
Search transcripts:    Advanced Search
Notable New     Yorkers
Select     Notable New Yorker
Mary LaskerMary Lasker
Photo Gallery
Transcript

Part:         Session:         Page of 999

Q:

Well, we've seen that work in other areas.

Lasker:

Of course.

Q:

Leeds Castle is used for that kind of thing.

Lasker:

Yes, it's used for that. But Cranston wants to do this especially in the field of aging, and he has started a voluntary committee -- not a federal committee, a voluntary committee called F.I.B.E.R., and is raising money for it.

I gave a dinner for him at “21” about three weeks ago to raise money for this. I don't know that we raised a lot of money because the need for it wasn't very clear to the people who were there. It is something that most people, unless you get into it, don't realize. There aren't enough meetings between people let's say that are interested in monoclonal antibodies, and people that are interested in interferon, and that if you bring six people together in a room and another six that are interested in something else that may come together like this, it will be much better than if they just wait to read their papers in scientific journals.

So that's his objective, and I have given him a little money, and I have done what I can about it.

Q:

Why is he so interested in the problem of aging?

Lasker:

I think he just sees that it's stupid to die for no reason, and that aging is a phenomenon that probably could be delayed. He's been convinced by researchers that it could be, that you can change the average length of life. I have said for years that you could change it by eliminating cancer and



© 2006 Columbia University Libraries | Oral History Research Office | Rights and Permissions | Help