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John B. OakesJohn B. Oakes
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Q:

The last time you did discuss pretty openly and pretty completely what your life was like growing up. But we didn't discuss, actually, specifically what your contact was with other members of the family.

Oakes:

With other members of the family?

Q:

Like, how frequently did you see people outside your immediate family? Who did you socialize with? Did you see Iphigene a lot?

Oakes:

I would say not a great deal. Julius, of all the -- Well, in my family, as I was growing up, the most intimate relationship I had, apart from my own home -- My father, who died when I was eighteen when I was at college, but whom I was very close to, I think, during all the years up to then, and who took my brother and me on trips, both to Europe and out West on a succession of summer trips. My father and my aunt, his sister, my unmarried maiden aunt who came to our household when my mother died, when I was one week old, and brought me up, and of course my brother, my mentor. That's my immediate family, obviously. But next to them, the people I saw a great deal of and felt very intimate with, really were my Philadelphia aunt, Mrs. [Bernie] Talimer, who was the youngest of the five brothers and sisters of my father. Well, there were six brothers and sisters. Three brothers: My father, his older brother, Adolph Ochs, and the younger brother, Milton B. in Chattanooga. He had three sisters: the aunt who brought me up, Nannie, and two other sisters, Ada, who lived in Chattanooga -- Mrs. Harry Adler -- and then Mrs. Talimer in Philadelphia. Mrs. Talimer, Aunt Mautie, we called her.

Q:

I'm sorry. What was that?



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