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John B. OakesJohn B. Oakes
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mean, what was your opinion of the peace movement? Were you in active discussions with people?

Oakes:

Well, I -- what year did you --

Q:

I think the editorials I found on the peace movement were in -- excuse me --

Oakes:

Well, whatever the year was, I --

Q:

Sixty-five.

Oakes:

-- can only tell you that I sure was in contact with one in particular, the most, in my view, really the outstanding leader of the peace movement. He was president of the University of California, Clark Kerr. He was a man of very considerable stature and a very fine guy who was devoting a huge amount of effort during this period in the middle '60s to advocating what seemed to me an extremely sensible peace movement in the sense of not advocating that we suddenly pull out our troops. I couldn't conscientiously advocate that kind of thing, either; but advocating a very major effort, which involved a good deal of sacrifice of, I suppose, of national pride and all that stuff, to negotiate a peace that would permit us to pull out our troops with some kind of decency and dignity. Now, was there anything more, though?

Q:

Well, in terms of the growing peace movement, the editorials I noticed were very supportive of people's right to protest, but were very critical of the burning of draft cards, for example.





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