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Justin Clarke-Doane
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Department of Philosophy
Columbia University
708 Philosophy Hall
MC: 4971
1150 Amsterdam Avenue
New York, NY 10027

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jc4345@columbia.edu

Curriculum Vitae | Research Statement




Books
book cover


Introduction
Chapter 1: Realism, Ontology and Objectivity
Chapter 2: Self-Evidence, Proof and Disagreement
Chapter 3: Observation and Indispensability
Chapter 4: Genealogical Debunking Arguments
Chapter 5: Explaining our Reliability
Chapter 6: Realism, Objectivity and Evaluation
Conclusio
ns


Available at: Oxford Scholarship Online.
[Errata]

Purchase at: Amazon, Book Depository, & Google

  • "Morality and Mathematics is a terrific book on the epistemological issues faced by realist views in mathematics and morality. Clarke-Doane provides a far more nuanced discussion of these issues than I've seen elsewhere, with sensitivity to what is common in the two domains, and what is different, and to the extent to which the apparent differences hide an underlying similarity. It is sure to become the standard work on this subject." --Hartry Field (NYU)

  • "Justin Clarke-Doane identifies and explores the shocking parallelism between morality and mathematics: on a surprising number of philosophical fronts, the two disparate subjects seem to face common problems and analogous solutions and rebuttals, whether the issue is realism, a priori justification, objectivity, naturalism or pluralism. With consummate philosophical skill, Clarke-Doane teases apart the differences and uncovers what is truly common and what is not. A remarkable philosophical work." --Joel David Hamkins (Notre Dame)


  • Philosophical Quarterly: "In this brilliantly original book, Justin Clarke-Doane...has upended many long-held views on morality and mathematics....Accept it or reject it, it manifests Clarke-Doane's extraordinary combination of philosophical imagination and logical skill, and what I have discussed in this review is only a small sample of the philosophical gold to be found in his book." -- David Gordon (Ludwig von Mises Institute)Thanks to Linda Wetzel for the pointer!
  • International Journal for the Study of Skepticism: "[The book's] place in the literature as something of a milestone has been obvious to interested parties for some time.  Morality and Mathematics is an outstanding achievement and will be the standard point of reference for future work on the topics of which it treats." -- Hallvard Lillehammer (Birkbeck College, University College, London)
  • Mind: "Clarke-Doane’s overarching metaphilosophical conclusion...is...that across a large range of philosophical debates...the real philosophical questions are not metaphysical...but practical, about which concepts to use....[W]e are left with a purely practical question of which framework to pick, which cannot itself be justified by appeal to more normativity....[P]erhaps a monist response can be afforded via an adaptation of Quine's response to Carnap....But whether or not this response...can be made to fly, Clarke-Doane's achievment...is substantial....[I]ncreased specialization makes serious engagement across subfields of philosophy a challenge.  Morality and Mathematics rises to this challenge, and will serve as a springboard to further serious engagement across the subdisciplines..." --Mary Leng (York)
  • Philosophia Mathematica: "This excellent book...compares morality and mathematics. Their similarities and differences are not what one might naively supposee, as the author demonstrates.  The book is highly recommended to philosophers interested in both subjects, and to anyone who seeks a global understanding of how morality and mathematics fit into our belief system....The idea that practical questions alone resist deflation in the face of pluralist...realism ...facilitated by the tension between realism and objectiity... mak[es]...for a rather striking metaphilosophical vision." --Michael Bevan & Alexander Paseau (Oxford University)

  • CHOICE: "Clarke-Doane...brings remarkable expertise and...research to [this project].  The main argument [is] copiously defended in this lucid but highly technical treatise....Underlying [the argument] is the important distinction between realism and objectivity....." --Sheila Mason (Concordia Uniiversity)


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