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Mamie ClarkMamie Clark
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Session:         Page of 100

Clark:

Hm-mm, occasionally, yes. Occasionally.

Now, there are many children who come here who have already been diagnosed. That's what they have clinics for. I think our most significant contribution lies in picking up those that haven't been discovered by anyone, or where the parents aren't aware. And also in trying to educate parents to right medical care for children. There's such an aura of hostility toward any kind of clinic, or place where people have to sit and wait for hours and hours, that people don't really take their children for regular examinations, and they don't get regular examinations in the school system.

So it's helping parents to know that it's important to take the children for an examination. Even though they don't find anything, it's still important.

Q:

Did you mention dental?

Clark:

Well, we pick up a lot of dental things too. And that's very difficult. It's harder to get dentists to do free work than it is to get doctors. There are not too many dental clinics, and the dentists who are in the health centers are only in their a little while. It's not like -- the doctors stay awhile. That's very difficult, to get dental care for the children, but we try. We pretty well manage it.

Q:

You don't have a dentist here?

Clark:

No, we don't have a dentist.

Q:

Why is it more difficult to get dentists to contribute some





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